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E-book
Author Desai, Murli.

Title A rights-based preventative approach for psychosocial well-being in childhood / Murli Desai
Published Dordrecht ; New York : Springer, [2010]
©2010
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Description 1 online resource (xxiii, 401 pages)
Series Children's well-being: indicators and research ; v. 3
Children's well-being: indicators and research series ; v. 3
Contents Note continued: 2.3. Categories of Child Rights -- 2.3.1. Child Right to Family Care -- 2.3.2. Child Right to Development -- 2.3.3. Child Right to Participation -- 2.3.4. Child Right to Protection -- 2.4. Principles of Child Rights -- 2.4.1. Primary Consideration to Dignity and the Best Interests of the Child -- 2.4.2. Indivisibility and Interdependence of Child Rights and Holistic Approach -- 2.4.3. Universality, Equality, Non-discrimination and Inclusion of the Marginalised Among Children -- 2.4.4. State and Societal Accountability -- References -- 3. Conceptual Framework for Rights-Based Preventative Approach for Psychosocial Well-Being in Childhood -- 3.1. Conceptual Framework for Rights-Based Preventative Approach for Psychosocial Well-Being in Childhood -- 3.1.1. Foundation -- 3.1.2. Objectives and Principles from the Child Rights Perspective -- 3.1.3. Goals from the Prevention Model of Health Care -- 3.1.4. Definition of Psychosocial Well-Being from the Theories of Positive Psychology -- 3.1.5. Intervention Aspects from Social Work Profession -- 3.2. Preventative Framework for Well-Being in Childhood -- 3.2.1. Current Classification of Child Welfare Services -- 3.2.2. Preventative Framework for Well-Being in Childhood -- 3.3. Approaches of Intervention with Children -- 3.3.1. Person-Centred Approach -- 3.3.2. Strengths-Based Approach -- 3.3.3. Participatory Approach -- 3.3.4. Empowerment-Focused Approach -- 3.4. Attitudes in Intervention with Children -- 3.4.1. Warmth -- 3.4.2. Humility -- 3.4.3. Empathy -- 3.5. Skills for Intervention with Children -- 3.5.1. Barriers in Communication -- 3.5.2. Open Communication -- 3.5.3. Feedback Skills -- 3.5.4. Use of Play and Humour -- 3.6. Ethical Principles of Intervention with Children -- 3.6.1. Self-Determination -- 3.6.2. Informed Consent -- 3.6.3. Professional Boundaries
Note continued: 3.6.4. Confidentiality -- References -- 4. Methodology of Psycho-educational Group Work -- 4.1. Concepts of Psycho-educational Group Work -- 4.2. Methodologies -- 4.2.1. Experiential Learning -- 4.2.2. Group Process -- 4.2.3. Facilitation Approach -- 4.3. Methods -- 4.3.1. Lecturettes -- 4.3.2. Pairing and Sharing, Small and Large Group Activities -- 4.3.3. Role-Plays and Simulations -- 4.3.4. Rounds and Brainstorming -- 4.3.5. Workshops -- 4.3.6. Self-Reflection and Expression -- 4.4. Tools -- 4.4.1. Case Studies -- 4.4.2. Local Stories and Songs -- 4.4.3. Games and Exercises -- 4.4.4. Energisers -- 4.4.5. Audio-Visual Aids -- 4.5. Discussion -- 4.5.1. Utility of Discussion -- 4.5.2. Techniques of Leading a Discussion -- 4.6. Programme Planning -- 4.6.1. Components of a Programme Plan -- 4.6.2. Background for Planning -- 4.6.3. Baseline Assessment of Needs and Expectations -- 4.6.4. Objectives -- 4.6.5. Topics and Schedule -- 4.6.6. Planning the Opening Session -- 4.6.7. Planning Topicwise Sessions -- 4.6.8. Planning the Closing Session -- 4.6.9. Organisational Plan -- References -- 5. Enrichment of Self-Awareness -- 5.1. Concepts of Self-Awareness -- 5.2. Self-Identity -- 5.2.1. Concepts of Self-Identity -- 5.2.2. Individual-Level Self-Identity -- 5.2.3. Group-Level Self-Identity -- 5.2.4. Activities -- 5.3. Self-Esteem -- 5.3.1. Concepts of Self-Esteem -- 5.3.2. Self-Acceptance -- 5.3.3. Self-Worth -- 5.3.4. Self-Love -- 5.3.5. Self-Confidence -- 5.3.6. Assertiveness -- 5.3.7. High Self-Esteem -- 5.3.8. Low Self-Esteem -- 5.3.9. Activities -- References -- 6. Enrichment of Proactive Thinking Skills -- 6.1. Concepts of Proactive Thinking Skills -- 6.1.1. Reactive Thinking -- 6.1.2. Proactive Thinking
Note continued: 6.2. Reframing Irrational Thinking with Rational and Critical Thinking Skills -- 6.2.1. Irrational Thinking -- 6.2.2. Rational and Critical Thinking Skills -- 6.2.3. Activities -- 6.3. Reframing Rigid Thinking with Flexible and Creative Thinking Skills -- 6.3.1. Rigid Thinking -- 6.3.2. Flexible and Creative Thinking Skills -- 6.3.3. Activities -- 6.4. Reframing Protective Thinking with Self-Responsibility -- 6.4.1. Passive Protectivity -- 6.4.2. Aggressive Protectivity -- 6.4.3. Distorting the Truth -- 6.4.4. Rationalisation -- 6.4.5. Self-Responsibility -- 6.4.6. Activities -- 6.5. Reframing Negative Thinking with Positive Thinking Skills -- 6.5.1. Negative Thinking -- 6.5.2. Positive Thinking Skills -- 6.5.3. Activities -- References -- 7. Enrichment of Emotional Intelligence -- 7.1. Concepts of Emotional Intelligence -- 7.1.1. Emotions -- 7.1.2. Emotional Intelligence -- 7.1.3. Linkage Between Thinking and Emotions -- 7.2. Emotional Awareness and Expression -- 7.2.1. Awareness and Expression of Emotions in Self -- 7.2.2. Awareness of Emotions in Others/Empathy -- 7.2.3. Activities -- 7.3. Regulating Negative Emotions -- 7.3.1. Concept of Regulating Negative Emotions -- 7.3.2. Anger -- 7.3.3. Hurt -- 7.3.4. Sadness -- 7.3.5. Fear and Anxiety -- 7.3.6. Activities -- 7.4. Enrichment of Positive Emotions -- 7.4.1. Concepts of Enrichment of Positive Emotions -- 7.4.2. Love -- 7.4.3. Joy and Happiness -- 7.4.4. Smile, Humour and Laughter -- 7.4.5. Activities -- References -- 8. Enrichment of Interpersonal Relationship Skills -- 8.1. Concepts of Interpersonal Relationship Skills -- 8.2. Interdependence in Relationships -- 8.2.1. Cohesion -- 8.2.2. Adaptability -- 8.2.3. Activities -- 8.3. Positive Perception of Others -- 8.3.1. Egalitarian Perception -- 8.3.2. Recognition of Strengths
Note continued: 8.3.3. Acceptance and Respect -- 8.3.4. Celebration of Differences -- 8.3.5. Activities -- 8.4. Positive Feelings for Others -- 8.4.1. Warmth -- 8.4.2. Humility -- 8.4.3. Empathy -- 8.4.4. Activities -- 8.5. Win[-]Win Goals in Relationships -- 8.5.1. Concepts -- 8.5.2. Activity -- 8.6. Collaborative Conflict Management Skills -- 8.6.1. Types of Interpersonal Conflict -- 8.6.2. Self-Fulfilling Prophecy in Conflicts -- 8.6.3. Collaborative Conflict Management Skills -- 8.6.4. Activities -- References -- 9. Enrichment of Interpersonal Communication Skills -- 9.1. Concepts of Interpersonal Communication Skills -- 9.1.1. Interpersonal Communication -- 9.1.2. Interpersonal Communication Skills -- 9.2. Verbal Communication Skills -- 9.2.1. Verbal Communication and Context -- 9.2.2. Open Communication Skills -- 9.2.3. Activities -- 9.3. Body Language Skills -- 9.3.1. Concepts of Body Language -- 9.3.2. Functions of Body Language -- 9.3.3. Difference Between Verbal and Body Language -- 9.3.4. Non-verbal Cues -- 9.3.5. Modes of Body Language -- 9.3.6. Activities -- 9.4. Sensitive Listening Skills -- 9.4.1. Barriers in Listening -- 9.4.2. Sensitive Listening Skills -- 9.4.3. Activities -- 9.5. Feedback Skills -- 9.5.1. Negative Feedback Skills -- 9.5.2. Positive Feedback Skills -- 9.5.3. Activities -- References -- 10. Family Life Education -- 10.1. Concepts of Family Life Education -- 10.1.1. Family and Household -- 10.1.2. Family in the Ecological Perspective -- 10.1.3. Types of Families -- 10.1.4. Family Life Education -- 10.2. Enrichment of Family Dynamics -- 10.2.1. Family Identity -- 10.2.2. Family Composition -- 10.2.3. Family Development -- 10.2.4. Family Relationships -- 10.2.5. Family Activities -- 10.2.6. Activities -- 10.3. Democratic Family Structure
Note continued: 10.3.1. Family Structure -- 10.3.2. Sexism and Rights of Women -- 10.3.3. Adultism and Rights of Child -- 10.3.4. Ageism and Rights of Elderly -- 10.3.5. Democratic Family Decision-Making -- 10.3.6. Activities -- References -- 11. Parenting Education -- 11.1. Concepts of Parenting Education -- 11.1.1. Importance and Steps of Parenting Education -- 11.1.2. Content of Parenting Education -- 11.2. Marital Relationship Skills -- 11.2.1. What Is Marriage -- 11.2.2. Attachment with Parents in Infancy -- 11.2.3. Marital Relationship Skills -- 11.3. Assertive Parenting Skills -- 11.3.1. Self-Identity as Parents -- 11.3.2. Assertive Parenting Style -- 11.3.3. Appreciation for Child's Play -- 11.3.4. Assertive Communication with the Child -- 11.3.5. Developing Child's Life Skills -- 11.3.6. Positive Disciplining of the Child -- 11.4. Age-Appropriate Development Interventions -- 11.4.1. Development Needs in Infancy -- 11.4.2. Development Needs in Toddlerhood -- 11.4.3. Development Needs in Preschoolage -- 11.4.4. Development Needs in Middle Childhood -- 11.4.5. Developmental Needs in Adolescence -- References -- 12. Process of Casework with Children and Their Families -- 12.1. Concepts of Process of Casework -- 12.2. Interview with Children and Their Families -- 12.2.1. Social Work Interview -- 12.2.2. Interview Setting -- 12.2.3. Planning an Interview -- 12.2.4. Interview Transitions -- 12.2.5. Summarising -- 12.3. Initial Stages of Casework with Children and Their Families -- 12.3.1. Engagement -- 12.3.2. Assessment -- 12.3.3. Planning -- 12.4. Concluding Stages of Casework with Children and Their Families -- 12.4.1. Evaluation -- 12.4.2. Termination -- References -- 13. Case Management with Children and Their Families -- 13.1. Concepts of Case Management -- 13.1.1. Importance of Case Management
Note continued: 13.1.2. Definition of Case Management -- 13.1.3. Principles of Case Management -- 13.1.4. Tasks of Case Managers -- 13.1.5. Principles of Teamwork for Case Management -- 13.1.6. Techniques of Case Management -- 13.2. Techniques of Direct Intervention with Children and Their Families -- 13.2.1. Giving Information and Advice -- 13.2.2. Teaching and Training Psychosocial Skills -- 13.2.3. Counselling Children -- 13.2.4. Working with Parents/Families -- 13.3. Techniques of System Linkage for Children and Their Families -- 13.3.1. Need for and Problems in System Linkages -- 13.3.2. Information and Referral -- 13.3.3. Inter-organisational Collaboration -- 13.3.4. Linkages with Natural Support Systems -- 13.3.5. Linkages with Self-Help Groups -- 13.3.6. Conflict Mediation -- References -- 14. Children at Risk of Neglect and Secondary Prevention -- 14.1. Concepts of Children at Risk of Neglect and Secondary Prevention -- 14.1.1. Children at Risk of Neglect -- 14.1.2. Secondary Prevention -- 14.2. Children with Special Needs -- 14.2.1. Situational Analysis -- 14.2.2. Interventions -- 14.3. Children of Substance Users -- 14.3.1. Situational Analysis -- 14.3.2. Interventions -- 14.4. Children of HIV/AIDS-Infected/Terminally Ill Parents -- 14.4.1. Situational Analysis -- 14.4.2. Interventions -- 14.5. Children of Divorce -- 14.5.1. Situational Analysis -- 14.5.2. Interventions -- 14.6. Children of Prisoners -- 14.6.1. Situational Analysis -- 14.6.2. Interventions -- 14.7. Child-Headed Households -- 14.7.1. Situational Analysis -- 14.7.2. Interventions -- 14.8. Street Children -- 14.8.1. Situational Analysis -- 14.8.2. Interventions -- References -- 15. Children in Emergency Situations and Secondary Prevention -- 15.1. Concepts of Children in Emergency Situations and Secondary Prevention
Note continued: 15.1.1. Children in Emergency Situations -- 15.1.2. Secondary Prevention -- 15.2. Children Affected by Emergency Situations in General -- 15.2.1. Situational Analysis of Children in Emergencies -- 15.2.2. Rights of Children in Emergency Situations -- 15.2.3. Intervention -- 15.3. Children Affected by Environmental Disasters -- 15.3.1. Concepts of Environmental Disasters -- 15.3.2. Intervention -- 15.4. Children Affected by Ethnic/Armed Conflicts -- 15.4.1. Concepts of Ethnic/Armed Conflicts -- 15.4.2. Situational Analysis of Children in Ethnic/Armed Conflicts -- 15.4.3. Child Rights for Protection in Ethnic/Armed Conflict -- 15.4.4. Intervention -- 15.5. Child Refugees -- 15.5.1. Concept of Refugees -- 15.5.2. Situational Analysis of Child Refugees -- 15.5.3. Rights of Child Refugees -- 15.5.4. Role of the United Nations Refugee Agency -- 15.5.5. Intervention -- References -- 16. Systems for Tertiary Prevention for Children -- 16.1. Concepts of Systems for Tertiary Prevention for Children -- 16.1.1. Goals of Tertiary Prevention -- 16.1.2. Systems and Interventions for Tertiary Prevention for Children -- 16.2. Juvenile Justice System -- 16.2.1. Concepts of Juvenile Justice System -- 16.2.2. Retributive Versus Restorative Justice -- 16.2.3. Child Rights for Restorative Justice -- 16.2.4. Child Advocacy Interventions for Restorative Justice -- 16.3. Substitute Child Welfare -- 16.3.1. Concepts and History of Substitute Child Welfare -- 16.3.2. Concerns in Substitute Child Welfare -- 16.3.3. Child Right to Biological Parental Care -- 16.3.4. Intervention -- 16.4. Foster Family Care of Children -- 16.4.1. Concepts of Foster Family Care -- 16.4.2. Child Rights in Foster Family Care -- 16.4.3. Intervention -- 16.5. Child Adoption -- 16.5.1. Concepts of Child Adoption -- 16.5.2. Child Rights in Adoption
Note continued: 16.5.3. Intervention -- 16.6. Institutional Childcare -- 16.6.1. Concepts of Institutional Childcare -- 16.6.2. Intervention -- References -- 17. Abuse in Childhood and Tertiary Prevention -- 17.1. Concepts of Abuse in Childhood and Tertiary Prevention -- 17.1.1. Child Abuse -- 17.1.2. Tertiary Prevention -- 17.2. Causes of Child Abuse -- 17.2.1. Psychosocial Theories of Child Abuse -- 17.2.2. Critical Theories of Child Abuse -- 17.2.3. Cycle of Abuse -- 17.3. Child Right to Protection from Abuse -- 17.4. Assessment of Child Abuse -- 17.4.1. Types of Assessment -- 17.4.2. Interview and Observation of the Child -- 17.4.3. Interview and Observation of the Family Members -- 17.4.4. Interview of the Abuser -- 17.5. Psychosocial Intervention in Child Abuse -- 17.5.1. Dealing with Guilt -- 17.5.2. Treating Fears and Anxiety -- 17.5.3. Treating Behavioural Problems -- 17.5.4. Rebuilding Trust -- 17.6. Emotional and Psychological Abuse of Children -- 17.6.1. Concepts of Emotional and Psychological Abuse of Children -- 17.6.2. Types of Emotional and Psychological Abuse of Children -- 17.6.3. Implications of Emotional and Psychological Abuse of Children -- 17.7. Physical Abuse of Children -- 17.7.1. Concepts of Physical Abuse of Children -- 17.7.2. Assessment of Physical Abuse of Children -- 17.7.3. Intervention with Abusive Parents -- 17.8. Sexual Abuse of Children -- 17.8.1. Concept of Child Sexual Abuse -- 17.8.2. Child Sex Abusers -- 17.8.3. Vulnerability to and Pre-conditions of Child Sexual Abuse -- 17.8.4. Impact of Child Sexual Abuse -- 17.8.5. Child Right to Protection from Sexual Abuse -- 17.8.6. Medical Assessment of Child Sexual Abuse -- 17.8.7. Intervention with Child Sexual Abuse -- References -- 18. Commercial Exploitation in Childhood and Tertiary Prevention
Note continued: 18.1. Concepts of Commercial Exploitation in Childhood and Tertiary Prevention -- 18.1.1. Commercial Exploitation in Childhood -- 18.1.2. Tertiary Prevention -- 18.2. Child Labour -- 18.2.1. Concepts of Child Labour -- 18.2.2. Causes of Child Labour -- 18.2.3. Child Right to Protection from Exploitation for Labour -- 18.2.4. Intervention -- 18.3. Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children -- 18.3.1. Concepts of Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children -- 18.3.2. Causes of Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children -- 18.3.3. Child Prostitution -- 18.3.4. Child Pornography -- 18.3.5. Child-Sex Tourism -- 18.3.6. Child Right to Protection from Commercial Sexual Exploitation -- 18.3.7. Intervention -- 18.4. Trafficking and Sale of Children -- 18.4.1. Child Trafficking -- 18.4.2. Sale of Children -- 18.4.3. Child Right to Protection from Trafficking and Sale -- 18.4.4. Intervention -- References -- 19. Conflict with Law in Childhood and Tertiary Prevention -- 19.1. Concepts of Conflict with Law in Childhood and Tertiary Prevention -- 19.1.1. Conflict with Law in Childhood -- 19.1.2. Tertiary Prevention -- 19.2. Causes of Conflict with Law in Childhood -- 19.2.1. Scientific Construction of "Normal" Childhood -- 19.2.2. Social Construction of Adolescence and Testing of Boundaries -- 19.2.3. Neglect and Abuse -- 19.2.4. Poverty and Class Conflict -- 19.2.5. Neuro-behavioural Disorders -- 19.3. Review of the Retributive Justice for Children -- 19.3.1. Police Violence -- 19.3.2. Detention -- 19.4. Child Rights in the Juvenile Justice System -- 19.4.1. United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child -- 19.4.2. United Nations Standard Minimum Rules for the Administration of Juvenile Justice -- 19.4.3. United Nations Rules for the Protection of Juveniles Deprived of Their Liberty
Note continued: 19.5. Child Advocacy Intervention for Restorative Justice -- 19.5.1. Child Advocacy Interventions for Restorative Justice -- 19.5.2. Prevention of Conflict with Law -- 19.5.3. Decriminalisation of Status Offences -- 19.5.4. Community-Based Diversion for Petty Offences -- 19.5.5. Regulating Detention for Violent Offences -- 19.5.6. Reintegration and Rehabilitation -- References
Summary Children are one of the most important phase of human development and the most important target group for social work intervention. Most of the schools of human development and social work round the world have an elective course on children and some offer a concentration in this area. There are plenty of textbooks on intervention with children published by Western authors, focusing on useful theories and skills but mainly at the remedial level. They neither use the preventative approach nor the child rights perspective, which has been found useful in the developing nations. The books on child
Bibliography Includes bibliographical references and index
Subject Child psychology.
Children's rights.
Psychology, Child.
Child Advocacy.
Form Electronic book
ISBN 9048190665
9789048190669