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Num Mark Subjects (1-43 of 43) Year Entries
59 Found
1   Paralysis -- 5 Related Subjects   5
2 Paralysis.   5
3   Paralysis agitans -- 2 Related Subjects   2
4  

Paralysis, Anterior spinal -- See Poliomyelitis


  1
5 Arm -- Paralysis. : Restoration of Function in Upper Limb Paralyses and Muscular Defects  2009 1
6 Brachial plexus -- Paralysis. : Brachial plexus palsy / editors, H. Kawai, H. Kawabata  2000 1
7  

Paralysis, Central Facial -- See Facial Paralysis


Severe or complete loss of facial muscle motor function. This condition may result from central or peripheral lesions. Damage to CNS motor pathways from the cerebral cortex to the facial nuclei in the pons leads to facial weakness that generally spares the forehead muscles. FACIAL NERVE DISEASES generally results in generalized hemifacial weakness. NEUROMUSCULAR JUNCTION DISEASES and MUSCULAR DISEASES may also cause facial paralysis or paresis
  1
8  

Paralysis, Cerebral -- See Cerebral palsy


  1
9  

Paralysis, Erb -- See Brachial Plexus Neuropathies


Diseases of the cervical (and first thoracic) roots, nerve trunks, cords, and peripheral nerve components of the BRACHIAL PLEXUS. Clinical manifestations include regional pain, PARESTHESIA; MUSCLE WEAKNESS, and decreased sensation (HYPESTHESIA) in the upper extremity. These disorders may be associated with trauma (including BIRTH INJURIES); THORACIC OUTLET SYNDROME; NEOPLASMS; NEURITIS; RADIOTHERAPY; and other conditions. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1351-2)
  1
10  

Paralysis, Erb-Duchenne -- See Brachial Plexus Neuropathies


Diseases of the cervical (and first thoracic) roots, nerve trunks, cords, and peripheral nerve components of the BRACHIAL PLEXUS. Clinical manifestations include regional pain, PARESTHESIA; MUSCLE WEAKNESS, and decreased sensation (HYPESTHESIA) in the upper extremity. These disorders may be associated with trauma (including BIRTH INJURIES); THORACIC OUTLET SYNDROME; NEOPLASMS; NEURITIS; RADIOTHERAPY; and other conditions. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1351-2)
  1
11 Eye -- Paralysis   2
12   Paralysis, Facial -- 2 Related Subjects   2
13  

Paralysis, Fowl -- See Marek Disease


A transmissible viral disease of birds caused by avian herpesvirus 2 (HERPESVIRUS 2, GALLID) and other MARDIVIRUS. There is lymphoid cell infiltration or lymphomatous tumor formation in the peripheral nerves and gonads, but may also involve visceral organs, skin, muscle, and the eye
  1
14  

Paralysis, Hemifacial -- See Facial Paralysis


Severe or complete loss of facial muscle motor function. This condition may result from central or peripheral lesions. Damage to CNS motor pathways from the cerebral cortex to the facial nuclei in the pons leads to facial weakness that generally spares the forehead muscles. FACIAL NERVE DISEASES generally results in generalized hemifacial weakness. NEUROMUSCULAR JUNCTION DISEASES and MUSCULAR DISEASES may also cause facial paralysis or paresis
  1
15   Paralysis, Infantile -- 2 Related Subjects   2
16 Paralysis -- Juvenile fiction. : The girl from the sea / James Aldridge  2002 1
17  

Paralysis, Klumpke -- See Brachial Plexus Neuropathies


Diseases of the cervical (and first thoracic) roots, nerve trunks, cords, and peripheral nerve components of the BRACHIAL PLEXUS. Clinical manifestations include regional pain, PARESTHESIA; MUSCLE WEAKNESS, and decreased sensation (HYPESTHESIA) in the upper extremity. These disorders may be associated with trauma (including BIRTH INJURIES); THORACIC OUTLET SYNDROME; NEOPLASMS; NEURITIS; RADIOTHERAPY; and other conditions. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1351-2)
  1
18  

Paralysis, Laryngeal -- See Vocal Cord Paralysis


Congenital or acquired paralysis of one or both VOCAL CORDS. This condition is caused by defects in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, the VAGUS NERVE and branches of LARYNGEAL NERVES. Common symptoms are VOICE DISORDERS including HOARSENESS or APHONIA
  1
19  

Paralysis, Legs -- See Paraplegia


Severe or complete loss of motor function in the lower extremities and lower portions of the trunk. This condition is most often associated with SPINAL CORD DISEASES, although BRAIN DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES; and MUSCULAR DISEASES may also cause bilateral leg weakness
  1
20  

Paralysis, Lower Extremities -- See Paraplegia


Severe or complete loss of motor function in the lower extremities and lower portions of the trunk. This condition is most often associated with SPINAL CORD DISEASES, although BRAIN DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES; and MUSCULAR DISEASES may also cause bilateral leg weakness
  1
21  

Paralysis, Lower Limbs -- See Paraplegia


Severe or complete loss of motor function in the lower extremities and lower portions of the trunk. This condition is most often associated with SPINAL CORD DISEASES, although BRAIN DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES; and MUSCULAR DISEASES may also cause bilateral leg weakness
  1
22  

Paralysis of the heart, Induced -- See Cardiac arrest, Induced


  1
23  

Paralysis of the Lower Brachial Plexus -- See Brachial Plexus Neuropathies


Diseases of the cervical (and first thoracic) roots, nerve trunks, cords, and peripheral nerve components of the BRACHIAL PLEXUS. Clinical manifestations include regional pain, PARESTHESIA; MUSCLE WEAKNESS, and decreased sensation (HYPESTHESIA) in the upper extremity. These disorders may be associated with trauma (including BIRTH INJURIES); THORACIC OUTLET SYNDROME; NEOPLASMS; NEURITIS; RADIOTHERAPY; and other conditions. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1351-2)
  1
24  

Paralysis Patients -- See Paralytics


  1
25  

Paralysis, Peripheral Facial -- See Facial Paralysis


Severe or complete loss of facial muscle motor function. This condition may result from central or peripheral lesions. Damage to CNS motor pathways from the cerebral cortex to the facial nuclei in the pons leads to facial weakness that generally spares the forehead muscles. FACIAL NERVE DISEASES generally results in generalized hemifacial weakness. NEUROMUSCULAR JUNCTION DISEASES and MUSCULAR DISEASES may also cause facial paralysis or paresis
  1
26 Paralysis -- Popular works. : Life on wheels : the A to Z guide to living fully with mobility issues / Gary Karp  2009 1
27 Paralysis -- prevention & control. : Neuromuscular monitoring in clinical practice and research / Thomas Fuchs-Buder  2010 1
28 Paralysis -- Psychological aspects.   3
29 Paralysis -- psychology. : Remaking the body : rehabilitation and change / Wendy Seymour  1998 1
30 Paralysis -- Research -- Vocational guidance. : Careers in medical research : finding cures for paralysis : spinal cord injuries, stroke, multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis : unlocking the mysteries of the brain and fixing a broken body  2007 1
31 Paralysis -- Social aspects.   2
32  

Paralysis, Spastic -- See Also the narrower term Cerebral palsy


  1
33 Paralysis, Spastic. : Adam Pearson: Freak Show / / Director: Poyntz, Nick  2015 1
34  

Paralysis, Spastic, in children -- See Also the narrower term Cerebral palsied children


  1
35 Paralysis, Spastic -- Patients -- Australia -- Biography. : Captives of care / John Roarty  1981 1
36  

Paralysis, Spinal, Quadriplegic -- See Quadriplegia


Severe or complete loss of motor function in all four limbs which may result from BRAIN DISEASES; SPINAL CORD DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES; or rarely MUSCULAR DISEASES. The locked-in syndrome is characterized by quadriplegia in combination with cranial muscle paralysis. Consciousness is spared and the only retained voluntary motor activity may be limited eye movements. This condition is usually caused by a lesion in the upper BRAIN STEM which injures the descending cortico-spinal and cortico-bulbar tracts
  1
37  

Paralysis, Todd -- See Paralysis


A general term most often used to describe severe or complete loss of muscle strength due to motor system disease from the level of the cerebral cortex to the muscle fiber. This term may also occasionally refer to a loss of sensory function. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p45)
  1
38  

Paralysis, Todd's -- See Paralysis


A general term most often used to describe severe or complete loss of muscle strength due to motor system disease from the level of the cerebral cortex to the muscle fiber. This term may also occasionally refer to a loss of sensory function. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p45)
  1
39 Paralysis -- Treatment. : Toward brain-computer interaction in paralysis : a new approach based on visual evoked potentials and depth-of-field / Anibal Cotrina  2017 1
40  

Paralysis, Unilateral, Vocal Cord -- See Vocal Cord Paralysis


Congenital or acquired paralysis of one or both VOCAL CORDS. This condition is caused by defects in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, the VAGUS NERVE and branches of LARYNGEAL NERVES. Common symptoms are VOICE DISORDERS including HOARSENESS or APHONIA
  1
41  

Paralysis, Vocal Cord -- See Vocal Cord Paralysis


Congenital or acquired paralysis of one or both VOCAL CORDS. This condition is caused by defects in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, the VAGUS NERVE and branches of LARYNGEAL NERVES. Common symptoms are VOICE DISORDERS including HOARSENESS or APHONIA
  1
42  

Paralysis, Vocal Cord, Unilateral -- See Vocal Cord Paralysis


Congenital or acquired paralysis of one or both VOCAL CORDS. This condition is caused by defects in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, the VAGUS NERVE and branches of LARYNGEAL NERVES. Common symptoms are VOICE DISORDERS including HOARSENESS or APHONIA
  1
43 Vocal cords -- Paralysis.   2
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