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Title Pejoration / edited by Rita Finkbeiner, Jörg Meibauer, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz ; Heike Wiese, University of Stuttgart
Published Amsterdam ; Philadelphia : John Benjamins Publishing Company, [2016]
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Description 1 online resource
Series Linguistik Aktuell/Linguistics Today, 0166-0829 ; 228
Contents Intro -- Pejoration -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC data -- Table of contents -- Preface -- What is pejoration, and how can it be expressed in language? -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Pejoration in grammar -- 2.1 Prosody -- 2.2 Word-formation -- 2.3 Syntax -- 2.4 Lexicon -- 2.5 Semantics -- 3. Pejoration in pragmatics -- 3.1 Speech acts -- 3.2 Implicatures -- 3.2.1 Conventional-implicature approach -- 3.2.2 Conversational implicatures -- 3.3 Deixis -- 3.4 Text and discourse -- 4. Further dimensions of pejoration -- References -- Part I: Pejoration in different linguistic domains -- Pejorative prosody -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Prosodic features -- 2.1 Fundamental frequency and pitch -- 2.2 Contour of the fundamental frequency in utterances -- Intonation contour -- 2.3 Speech rate and duration -- 2.4 Stress -- 3. Research on attitudes -- 4. Planning and implementation of an experiment to compare positive with pejorative evaluative speaking styles -- 4.1 Text material -- 4.2 Speakers -- 4.3 Voice recordings -- 4.4 Perception tests -- 5. Results of perception tests -- 5.1 Auditory analysis of positive evaluations -- 5.2 Auditory analysis of negative evaluations -- 6. Acoustic analyses -- 6.1 Distribution of fundamental frequency -- 6.2 Mean fundamental frequency, standard deviation and range -- 6.3 Characteristics of the fundamental frequency contours -- 6.4 Graphical representation of the fundamental frequency contours -- 6.5 Steepness of contours -- 6.6 Realization of stress -- 6.7 Analysis of duration and speech rate -- 7. Conclusions -- References -- How do evaluative derivational meanings arise? A bit of Geforsche and Forscherei -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Are Ge-e and -(er)ei pejorative derivation patterns? -- 3. Diachronic corpus analysis -- 3.1 Aims and method -- 3.2 The corpora -- 3.3 Bases and contexts -- 3.4 Findings
2.5 Turn-initial reply usage -- 3. Characteristic features of bla, bla, bla -- 3.1 Syntactic features -- 3.2 Phonological features -- 3.3 Lexical-semantic features -- 4. Bla, bla, bla as a meta-linguistic device -- 5. Interim results -- 6. Pejoration -- coded or inferential? -- 6. Summary -- References -- Pejoratives in Korean -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Preliminaries -- 3. Typology and development of pejoratives -- 3.1 Peripherality -- 3.2 Insignificance -- 3.3 Lack of sophistication -- 3.4 Undesirable events/postures -- 3.5 Feigned repetition -- 3.6 Lack of specification -- 4. Discussion -- 4.1 Conceptual Motivation -- 4.1.1 Devaluation attached to periphery -- 4.1.2 Devaluation attached to small-size and non-humans -- 4.1.3 Devaluation attached to lack of sophistication -- 4.1.4 Devaluation attached to certain events and postures -- 4.1.5 Devaluation attached to repetition -- 4.1.6 Devaluation attached to lack of noteworthiness -- 4.2 Cultural Motivation -- 4.3 Subjectification and intersubjectification -- 5. Summary and conclusion -- References -- Pejorative aspects attributed to hearing people in signed constructed dialogue -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Constructed dialogue in German Sign Language (GSL) -- 3. Typification as "hearing" through CD -- 4. Signed data analyses -- 5. Digression A: Wolf and Hare (and Hedgehog ) -- 6. "The hearing" in pejorative CDs -- 7. Digression B: "The deaf who conforms" -- 8. Conclusion -- References -- Index
4. Discussion: How conventionalized is the pejorative derivational meaning? -- 5. Outlook -- References -- Quantification with pejoratives -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Pejoratives and use-conditional meaning -- 3. The semantics of pejoratives -- 4. L∗CI -- LCI and its extensions -- 4.1 Composition in LCI -- 4.2 Compositionality -- 4.3 Denotations -- 5. Quantificational problems with pejoratives -- 6. Compositional multidimensionality -- 6.1 Lexical extensions -- 6.2 Cross-dimensional quantification -- 7. Conclusion -- References -- Pejoration, normalcy conceptions and generic sentences -- 1. Introduction: Examples for pejoration with generic sentences -- 2. Normalcy conceptions -- 2.1 Propositional expression of normality -- 2.2 Properties of Normalcy Conceptions -- 3. Generic sentences -- 3.1 What is the connection between normalcy conceptions and generic sentences? -- 4. What properties of generic sentences as expressions of NC make them suitable for pejorations? -- 5. Conclusion -- References -- Demonstrative pejoratives -- 1. Introduction -- 2. German demonstratives: State of the art -- 2.1 Demonstrative paradigms in German -- 2.2 Re-direction of attention and affectivity as demonstrativity functions -- 3. What is pejoration? -- 4. Cognitive proximity -- 5. Demonstratives and pejoration revisited -- 5.1 German proximal demonstrative dies- and pejoration -- 5.2 German distal jen- and 'cognitive distance' -- 6. Summing up -- References -- Part II: Pejoration, slurring and sarcasm -- Slurring as insulting -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Slurs as illocutionary indicators -- 2.1 Illocutionary indicator -- 2.2 Stereotypical meaning of slurs -- 2.3 On the force of illocutionary indicators -- 3. Slurring as insulting -- 3.1 Slurring as a speech act -- 3.2 Slurring as insulting -- 3.3 Non-derogatory uses explained -- 4. A critique of the multi-act approach
4.1 Two propositions -- two speech acts? -- 4.2 Dominance of illocutionary indicators -- 4.3 Indirect insulting -- 5. Conclusions -- References -- A multi-act perspective on slurs -- 1. The semantic status of derogatory content -- 2. Criticisms to the notion of conventional implicature -- 3. From multi-propositions to multi-acts -- 4. Formalization -- 5. Other kinds of pejoratives -- 6. Conclusion -- References -- The meaning and use of slurs -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Contexts of use -- 3. Target Group vs. In-Group -- 4. The Semantics of Slur Terms -- 5. Degree of Offensiveness -- 6. Semantic change -- 7. Conclusion -- References -- Pejoration via sarcastic irony and sarcasm -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Pejorative power of irony -- 2.1 Boosting or minimising negative evaluation via irony -- 3. Defining irony -- 4. Irony vs. sarcasm -- 4.1 Sarcasm -- 5. Sarcastic irony -- 6. Conclusions -- References -- Part III: Pejoration in different linguistic contexts -- Pejoration in contact -- 1. Introduction: Pejoration and structural borrowing -- 2. Pejoration through m-reduplication -- 2.1 A possible source: Turkish m-reduplication -- 2.2 Similar developments in American English from a Yiddish source -- 2.3 Support from existing patterns in German -- 2.4 m-reduplication in urban German -- 2.5 Pejoration, amplification, 'coolness', and fun: From echo word formation to pejoration -- 3. Depejoration through "Scherz/Spaß" 'just kidding' -- 3.1 "Scherz/Spaß" and "şaka" in German and Turkish -- 3.2 Depejoration and joking: Words said in jest -- 4. Conclusion: Developmental paths and constructional pejoration -- References -- Bla, bla, bla in German. A pejorative construction? -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Main usages of bla, bla, bla -- 2.1 Dummy element usage -- 2.2 List extender usage -- 2.3 Dummy utterance usage -- 2.4 Utterance list extender usage
Bibliography Includes bibliographical references and index
Notes Print version record and CIP data provided by publisher
Subject Pejoration (Linguistics)
Form Electronic book
Author Finkbeiner, Rita.
Meibauer, Jörg.
Wiese, Heike.
LC no. 2016008552
ISBN 9027267367 (pdf)
9789027267368 (pdf)
(hb ;) (alk. paper)