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E-book
Author McAneny, Paul J

Title Red Is good : transformational changes for US Air Force aircraft maintenance / Paul J. McAneny
Published Maxwell AIr Force Base, Ala. : Air Unitversity Press, [2009]
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Description 1 online resource (vii, 37 pages)
Series Maxwell paper ; no. 46
Maxwell paper (Air University (U.S.). Air War College) ; no. 46
Summary Over the last 20 years, the U.S. Air Force has seen a 40 percent reduction in the size of its air fleet, while the average age of that inventory has gone from 8 years in 1973 to 24 years in 2008. The negative trend is expected to continue to a projected average age of 26.5 years by 2012. On any given day, 14 percent of the remaining fleet (about 800 aircraft) is either grounded or operating with age-related flight restrictions. Within this challenging environment of flat or decreasing budgets, limited manpower, and a rapidly aging air fleet, the Air Force sought a way to transform its culture not only to survive, but to remain the world's premier force in the domains of air, space, and cyberspace. The Air Force transformation initiative, called Air Force Smart Operations for the 21st Century (AFSO21), was begun after considering only the effects desired, not the organizational-level changes required to successfully implement the transformation. The desired effects of AFSO21 are as follows: (1) increasing Airman productivity, (2) improving readiness and availability of critical equipment, (3) increasing responsiveness and agility, (4) sustaining and improving operational safety and reliability, and (5) increasing energy efficiency. This paper focuses on the cultural changes required to achieve the desired effects of AFSO21, based on the relentless pursuit of continuous process improvement. In a Red Is Good culture, problems are viewed as great opportunities to improve rather than failures or threats. This investigation will be framed by three research questions: (1) Can focused metrics precede cultural change?; (2) Does the Air Force, specifically the aircraft maintenance community, currently support a Red Is Good culture?; and (3) If so, is the aircraft maintenance community a bona fide learning organization that can achieve the greatest impact possible from continuous process-improvement initiatives?
Analysis AFSO21(AIR FORCE SMART OPERATIONS FOR THE 21ST CENTURY)
AIR FORCE CULTURE
AIRCRAFT AVAILABILITY
CONTINUOUS PROCESS IMPROVEMENT
CULTURAL CHANGE
ENERGY EFFICIENCY
HSLDR(HOME-STATION LOGISTICS DEPARTURE RELIABILITY RATE)
MISSION CAPABLE RATE
ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE
RED IS GOOD
RESPONSIVENESS
TOYOTA MOTOR CORPORATION
UTILIZATION RATE
Notes "August 2009."
Title from title screen (viewed on Nov. 30, 2009)
Bibliography Includes bibliographical references (pages 33-37)
Subject United States. Air Force
United States. Air Force.
Airplanes, Military -- United States -- Maintenance and repair
Combat sustainability (Military science)
Air force.
Aircraft maintenance.
Aircraft.
Culture.
Metrics.
Operational readiness.
Problem solving.
Transformations.
Administration and management.
Availability.
Aviation safety.
Efficiency.
Energy conservation.
Life expectancy(service life)
Logistics, military facilities and supplies.
Maintenance management.
Military aircraft.
Productivity.
Reliability.
Utilization.
Airplanes, Military -- Maintenance and repair.
Combat sustainability (Military science)
United States.
Form Electronic book
Author Air University (U.S.). Air War College
Other Titles Transformational changes for US Air Force aircraft maintenance