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Book Cover
Book
Author Burridge, Kate, author

Title For the love of language : an introduction to linguistics / Kate Burridge, Tonya N. Stebbins
Published Cambridge ; Port Melbourne, Vic. : Cambridge University Press, 2016
Port Melbourne, VIC : Cambridge University Press, 2016
©2016

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Location Call no. Vol. Availability
 MELB  410 Bur/Ftl  AVAILABLE
 MELB  410 Bur/Ftl  DUE 30-06-20
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 W'PONDS  410 Bur/Ftl  AVAILABLE
Description xviii, 497 pages : illustrations ; 28 cm
Contents Contents note continued: 17.2.Language acquisition pathways -- A note about 'input' -- The critical period hypothesis -- 17.3.Acquisition of phonology -- The 'fis phenomenon' -- 17.4.Acquisition of vocabulary -- 17.5.Acquisition of grammar -- The one-word stage -- The two-word stage -- Telegraphic speech and beyond -- 17.6.Other things you need to know to be a user of language -- Acquiring honorifics in Japanese -- 17.7.Development of literacy -- Exploration of a literate identity -- Exploration of text features -- Early reading -- Reading for meaning -- Independent reading -- Developing writing -- 17.8.Second-language acquisition -- Developmental patterns in second-language acquisition -- The impact of the first language in second-language acquisition -- Success factors in second-language acquisition -- 17.9.Growing up bilingual -- Acquisition of phonology -- Acquisition of vocabulary -- Acquisition of grammar -- Language awareness and differentiation --
Contents note continued: 9.0.Introduction -- 9.1.Grammaticality -- 9.2.The basic clause -- 9.3.Sentence types (simple, coordinate, complex) -- 9.4.Constituency and phrases -- 9.5.Categories and functions -- 9.6.Grammatical relations and semantic roles -- Syntactic ambiguity -- 9.7.Phrase structure rules -- Recursion -- 9.8.Word order types -- 9.9.Transitivity -- The subject -- The object -- Direct and indirect objects -- Predicative complements -- Adjuncts -- 9.10.Clause types -- 9.11.Some final thoughts -- Further Reading -- Exercises/Discussion Points -- Research Project -- ch. 10 Variation and identity -- 10.0.Introduction -- 10.1.'The chaos of a living speech' -- 10.2.Languages, dialects, accents - and standards -- When do dialects become languages? -- 10.3.User-related differences: regional variation -- Case study: regional variation in Australian English -- Case study: regional variation in Auslan -- 10.4.User-related differences: social variation --
Contents note continued: Case study: age-related variation -- 10.5.User-related differences: situational variation -- 10.6.Style - what makes individuals and groups distinctive? -- Slanguage and swearing -- 10.7.Online identities -- 10.8.An end on't - the 'chaos of a living speech' is not so chaotic -- Further Reading -- Exercises/Discussion Points -- Research Project -- ch. 11 Structure across time -- 11.0.Introduction -- 11.1.The 'what' of change: phonology -- Old sounds drop out - deletion -- New sounds appear - epenthesis -- Existing sounds are modified - assimilation, dissimilation and metathesis -- Phonetic versus phonological change -- 11.2.The 'what' of change: grammar -- Change in morphology - morphological types -- Change in morphology - analogy -- Change in syntax - word order types -- Change in syntax - creating grammar -- 11.3.The 'how' of change -- All changes occur in a social context -- Changes proceed gradually through the system -- 11.4.The 'why' of change --
Contents note continued: Exercises/Discussion Points -- Research Project -- ch. 13 Language and text -- 13.0.Introduction -- 13.1.Information packaging -- Given information comes before new -- Topic comes before comment -- Principle of front focus -- 13.2.Special discourse strategies -- Passives - creating new subjects -- Existentials (or there-constructions) -- Extraposition -- Cleft constructions -- Fronting -- Dislocation -- 13.3.Cohesion -- Reflexive pronouns -- Deixis - 'pointing words' -- 13.4.Different types of communication -- Conversations -- Expressing support -- Turn-taking -- Narrative structures -- Cultural aspects of narratives -- 13.5.Ethnography of communication -- Further Reading -- Exercises/Discussion Points -- Research Project -- ch. 14 Language and interaction -- 14.0.Introduction -- 14.1.Some preliminary observations -- 14.2.Context - linguistic and situational -- 14.3.The force of words -- 14.4.The Cooperative Principle -- Maxim of Quantity --
Contents note continued: Further Reading -- Exercises/Discussion Points -- Research Project -- ch. 5 Morphology: the structure of words -- 5.0.Introduction -- 5.1.Word, lexemes and morphemes -- 5.2.Roots, stems and affixes -- 5.3.Inflection and derivation -- Paradigms -- 5.4.Morphs and allomorphs -- 5.5.Lexical and grammatical morphemes -- 5.6.Word classes/parts of speech -- Nouns -- Verbs -- Adjectives and adverbs -- 5.7.More morphological processes -- Modification -- Suppletion -- 5.8.Productive morphemes -- Further Reading -- Exercises/Discussion Points -- Research Project -- ch. 6 Semantics: the meaning of words -- 6.0.Introduction -- 6.1.The meaning of meaning -- 6.2.Meaning properties: ambiguity and anomaly -- 6.3.Lexical relations - all those 'nyms' -- Synonymy -- Antonomy -- Homonymy -- Polysemy -- Hyponymy -- 6.4.Meaning components -- Natural semantic metalanguage -- 6.5.Meaning and context -- 'You shall know a word by the company it keeps': collocation --
Contents note continued: Idioms: special examples of collocation -- 6.6.Metonymy and metaphor -- 6.7.Semantic change - types of meaning shifts -- Broadening -- Narrowing -- Shifting -- Changing values: elevation and deterioration -- Why words shift their meanings -- 6.8.Slips of the ear and brain -- 6.9.Phonesthemes -- Further Reading -- Exercises/Discussion Points -- Research Project -- ch. 7 Phonetics -- 7.0.Introduction -- 7.1.Articulatory phonetics and the vocal tract -- 7.2.Consonants -- Voicing -- Manner of articulation -- Stops -- Fricatives -- Affricates -- Approximants -- The International Phonetic Alphabet -- 7.3.Vowels -- The basics -- Australian and New Zealand English -- Other languages -- Diphthongs -- 7.4.Uncomfortable relations - the written and spoken word -- Sounds to symbols -- 7.5.Prosody -- Syllables -- Pitch and intonation -- Tone -- Paralinguistic features -- 7.6.Unpacking the parts -- Phonetics and sound symbolism -- 7.7.Acoustic phonetics --
Contents note continued: Maxim of Quality -- Maxim of Relation -- Maxim of Manner -- 14.5.Extracting meaning from talk -- Contravening maxims -- Presuppositions -- Inferencing -- Implicature -- 14.6.(Im)politeness -- Face -- Social distance -- Relative power -- Ranking impositions -- 14.7.Cross-cultural pragmatics -- Silence across cultures -- When insults aren't insults - the 'Banter Principle' -- 14.8.Discourse analysis -- Further Reading -- Exercises/Discussion Points -- Research Project -- ch. 15 Language and social values -- 15.0.Introduction -- 15.1.Linguistic prejudice and stereotyping -- 15.2.The identity functions of language -- 15.3.Verbal hygiene - doctrines of correctness and linguistic purism -- Style guides -- Good grammar -- Political correctness -- Language and gender -- 15.4.Prescription, competence and social inclusion -- Educational implications of non-standard variation -- 15.5.Language planning -- Language planning - who decides? -- Graphisation --
Contents note continued: Modernisation -- Standardisation -- 15.6.Language and nation -- Ideologies of national language planning -- 15.7.The monolingual mindset -- Further Reading -- Exercises/Discussion Points -- Research Project -- ch. 16 Language, the mind and the brain -- 16.0.Introduction -- 16.1.Language, culture and the mind -- 16.2.How language maps onto the brain -- 16.3.Ways of learning about language and the brain -- Behavioural methods of psycholinguistic research -- Neuroimaging techniques -- 16.4.Models of language processing -- 16.5.Language production -- Error analysis -- Lexical retrieval -- 16.6.Comprehending words -- 16.7.Comprehending sentences -- 16.8.The bilingual brain -- 16.9.Language disability -- Developmental disability -- Acquired disability -- Further Reading -- Exercises/Discussion Points -- Research Project -- ch. 17 Language acquisition -- 17.0.Introduction -- 17.1.Approaches to language acquisition research --
Contents note continued: Physiological factors - simplicity -- Social factors - the speech community -- Frequency factors - the effects of repetition -- 11.5.Language families and establishing a genetic relationship -- How to confirm genetic relationships -- How do language families arise? -- Mapping change as trees and waves -- 11.6.Attitudes to change -- Further Reading -- Exercises/Discussion Points -- Research Project -- ch. 12 Languages and cultures in contact -- 12.0.Introduction -- 12.1.Types of contact between languages -- The outcomes of language contact -- 12.2.Language maintenance -- Diglossia -- Code-switching -- Structural borrowing -- Areal linguistics -- 12.3.Language shift -- Language maintenance and reclamation -- Factors contributing to language shift -- 12.4.The creation of new languages -- Pidgin languages -- Creoles -- New mixed languages -- 12.5.Language choice and linguistic accommodation -- 12.6.Translation and interpreting -- Further Reading --
Contents note continued: Research Project -- ch. 3 Ways to study language -- 3.0.Introduction -- 3.1.Sources of linguistic data -- Corpora -- Observational data, including participant observation and case studies -- Interview data, questionnaires and focus groups -- Experimental data -- 3.2.Uses of linguistic data -- Quantitative analysis -- Qualitative analysis -- 3.3.Ethics in linguistics -- Human research ethics -- Power, representation and authorship -- Relationships and research partnerships -- Further Reading -- Exercises/Discussion Points -- Research Project -- ch. 4 What's in a word? -- 4.0.Introduction -- 4.1.Defining a word -- Three facets of wordhood -- 4.2.Lexical versus grammatical words -- 4.3.Formulaic expressions (or lexical chunks) -- 4.4.Magical words: names -- 4.5.Lexical addition -- Acronyms -- Shortenings -- Compounding -- Affixation -- Backformation -- Blends -- Conversion -- Commonisation -- Reduplication -- Borrowing -- 4.6.Word mortality --
Contents note continued: The benefits of growing up bilingual -- Further Reading -- Exercises/Discussion Points -- Research Project -- ch. 18 Computational linguistics -- 18.0.Introduction -- 18.1.How does HAL understand what is said? -- Speech recognition -- Syntactic and semantic analysis -- 18.2.How does HAL say anything? -- 18.3.Machine translation -- 18.4.Corpus linguistics -- 18.5.Techniques from genetics -- 18.6.Conclusion -- Further Reading -- Exercises/Discussion Points -- Research Project
Contents note continued: Visualising sound -- Acoustic analysis - how it's used -- Forensic phonetics -- Sociophonetics -- Sound change -- Further Reading -- Exercises/Discussion Points -- Research Project -- ch. 8 Phonology: the sound system -- 8.0.Introduction -- 8.1.Phonemes, phones - and allophones -- Why bother with allophones and phonemes? -- 8.2.Sounds in connected speech - phonological processes -- Changes that alter syllable structure: deletion, addition and reordering of sounds -- Processes that involve the modification of sounds -- 8.3.Determining phonemes -- Minimal pairs -- Complementary distribution -- So-called free variation -- Phonetic similarity -- 8.4.Distinctive features and natural classes -- 8.5.The pronunciation of morphemes - morphs and allomorphs -- 8.6.Prosodic phonology -- Syllable structure -- Phonotactic constraints -- Prosodic features -- Further Reading -- Exercises/Discussion Points -- Research Project -- ch. 9 Syntax: the structure of sentences --
Machine generated contents note: ch. 1 What is language? -- 1.0.Introduction -- 1.1.Hockett's design features of language -- 1.2.Signs -- 1.3.Arbitrariness of signs -- 1.4.Language modalities -- 1.5.'Infinite use of finite means': rules and paradigms -- 1.6.Prescriptive and descriptive approaches -- 1.7.The ideal and the real -- 1.8.Language in its social context -- 1.9.Language across time -- Further Reading -- Exercises/Discussion Points -- Research Project -- ch. 2 What linguists do -- 2.0.Introduction -- 2.1.Everyone should know about language -- 2.2.Linguistics at work -- Linguists in the legal system -- Linguists in education -- Linguists and communication -- Linguists in the field -- Linguists in advertising and marketing -- Linguists in health sciences -- Linguists in business and professional services -- Linguists in the film industry -- Linguists in computing and technology -- 2.3.Some final remarks -- Further Reading -- Exercises/Discussion Points --
Summary Language is essential to human life, both as a basic social necessity and also as a powerful and complex social resource. For the Love of Language: An Introduction to Linguistics offers a comprehensive introduction to the workings of language and the role of linguistics in investigating its fundamental design. This thorough and engaging investigation into language and linguistics covers topics including: strategies for learning about how language works using linguistics to address real-world problems the structure and meaning of words the systems that organise language changes to language over time how language is used in written and spoken communication the links between language, the mind and the world. Written by authors with extensive academic experience in the field of linguistics and including examples from Australia, New Zealand and around the world to engage the reader, For the Love of Language is a lively yet comprehensive resource for undergraduate students in foundation linguistics
Analysis Australian
Notes Record machine-generated from publisher information
Bibliography Includes bibliographic references (pages 473-485) and index
Subject Communism and linguistics.
Language and languages.
Linguistics.
Sociolinguistics.
Author Stebbins, Tonya N., author
LC no. 2015298695
ISBN 1107618835
9781107618831
Other Titles An introduction to linguistics