Limit search to available items
67 results found. Sorted by relevance | date | title .
Book Cover
Book
Author McQuade, Samuel C.

Title Understanding and managing cybercrime / Samuel C. McQuade III
Published Boston : Allyn and Bacon, [2006]
©2006

Copies

Location Call no. Vol. Availability
 MELB  364.168 Mcq/Uam  TEMPORARILY UNAVAILABLE
Description 500 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
Contents Foreword / Charles Wellford -- Part 1. Understanding Cybercrime -- 1. Cybercrime: A New High-Tech Crime Paradigm -- 1.0. Introduction: What Is Cybercrime? -- 1.1. Understanding Human Behavior in Evolving Social and Technological Contexts -- 1.1.1. Relatively Normal versus Deviant Behavior -- 1.1.2. Normal versus Deviant Use of Information Technology -- Cyber Tale 1.1. Inappropriate Use of Cell Phones in Public -- 1.1.3. Normalcy, Deviancy, and Crime in Cyberspace -- 1.2. High-Tech Crime Constructs and Terms -- 1.2.1. White Collar, Financial, and Organized Crime -- 1.2.2. Emergence of Computer-Related Abuse and Crime -- Cyber Tale 1.2. Policing without Desktop and Laptop Computers and Other IT Devices -- 1.2.3. Technology Fusion Brings about Cybercrime -- Cyber Tale 1.3. Policing with Desktop and Laptop Computers and other IT Devices -- 1.3. Importance of Defining and Understanding Crime Terms -- 1.3.1. What Is Cybercrime and Why Should We Care about It? -- Box 1.1. Definitional Constructs of High-Tech Crime -- 1.3.2. Creating, Complying with, and Enforcing Laws and Regulations -- 1.3.3. Research and Justice Systems Improvement -- Cyber Case 1.1. Why Definitions of Crime Matter: State of New York v. Robert Versaggi -- 1.4. Principles for Better Understanding Cybercrime and Future Crime Labels -- 1.4.1. Recognize and Accept that Views of Cybercrime Differ -- 1.4.2. Education and Training Helps Professionals Stay Informed -- 1.4.3. Inter and Multidisciplinary Nature of Cybercrime and Organization of the Text -- 2. Information and Other Assets in Need of Assurance -- 2.0. Introduction: What Are We Protecting? -- 2.1. Technology, Information, and Data in Justice and Security Management -- 2.1.1. Six Primary Characteristics of Information -- Box 2.1. Six Primary Characteristics of Data -- 2.1.2. Data versus Knowledge Management -- 2.1.3. Additional Knowledge and Data Considerations -- 2.2. Information Assurance -- 2.2.1. Basic Prescription for What Is Needed: CIA -- 2.2.2. Becoming Pragmatic about Information Assurance -- Cyber Tale 2.1. Who Can You Trust? Credit Card Fraud by "Friends" -- 2.3. Attack Dimensions -- 2.3.1. Cyber versus Physical Attacks and Security Systems -- 2.3.2. Insider versus Outsider Threats to Assets -- Cyber Case 2.1. Phone Service-Scamming Prison Warden -- Cyber Case 2.2. Collective of Money-Laundering Professionals -- Cyber Case 2.3. Double Rip-off Mortgage Scheme -- 2.3.3. Diagnosing and Responding to Threats and Attacks -- 2.4. Critical Infrastructure Protection -- 2.4.1. What are Critical Infrastructures and Critical Information Infrastructures? -- 2.4.2. Conceptual and National Differences in Infrastructures -- 2.4.3. Critical Information Infrastructure Protection -- 2.4.4. Can the Net Be Taken Down? -- 3. IT-Enabled Abuse, Attacks, and Crimes -- 3.0. Introduction: How Are Information Technologies Misused? -- 3.1. Types of Abuse, Attacks, and Crime -- 3.1.1. Writing and Distributing Malicious Code -- Box 3.1. Differences between Computer Viruses, Worms, and Trojans -- 3.1.2. Fraudulent Schemes and Theft -- Cyber Tale 3.1. How One Student Avoided Being Defrauded Online -- Cyber Tale 3.2. Student Victim of Credit Card Fraud -- 3.1.3. Interfering with and Disrupting Computer Services -- Cyber Tale 3.3. How One Student Fought Fraud with Fraud -- Cyber Tale 3.4. Suckered as the Result of Porn Curiosity -- Cyber Tale 3.5. Denial-of-Service Attacks Hit Gaming Website -- 3.1.4. Computer Spying and Intrusions -- Cyber Tale 3.6. Free and Illegal Phone Phreaking -- Cyber Tale 3.7. Infamous Back Orifice Remote Control Tool -- 3.1.5. Unauthorized and Illegal File Sharing -- 3.1.6. Abuse of Computers and Electronic Devices in Academia -- Cyber Tale 3.8. Mass-Distributed Illegal File Sharing -- 3.1.7. Online Harassment and Computer-Enabled Sex Crimes -- Cyber Case 3.1. Online Harassment via a Website Soliciting Sex -- Cyber Case 3.2. Cyberstalking Star Trek Voyager's Seven of Nine -- 3.2. Evolving Forms of Cybercrimes, Attacks, and Conflict -- 3.2.1. Emerging Crime and Attack Trends -- 3.2.2. Futuristic Forms of Cyber Conflict -- Cyber Tale 3.9. Installation of Multiple Alien Servers -- 4. Computer Abusers and Cybercriminals -- 4.0. Introduction: Who Commits Computer Abuse and Cybercrime? -- 4.1. Behavioral and Social Traits of Abusers, Attackers, and Criminals -- 4.1.1. Social Engineering Tactics -- Cyber Tale 4.1. Victimized by a Social Engineering Friend -- 4.1.2. Adversarial SKRAM Model -- Cyber Tale 4.2. Three Friends, of Whom Two Were Hackers -- Cyber Tale 4.3. Juvenile Geek Paid for Corporate Espionage and Sabotage -- 4.1.3. What Cybercriminals Fear -- Cyber Tale 4.4. SKRAM Needed to Create and Use Fake Ids -- 4.2. Categorizing Cyber Abusers, Attackers, and Criminals -- 4.2.1. Stereotypical and Other Adversary Profiles -- 4.2.2. Who Are Cybercriminals Really? -- 4.2.3. More Comprehensive Categorization Schema -- Part 2. Theoretical and Social Perspectives on Cybercrime -- 5. Theories of Computer-Enabled Abuse and Crime -- 5.0. Introduction: Why Do People Commit Cyber Abuse and Crime? -- 5.1. Theories: The Building Blocks of Knowledge and Understanding -- 5.1.1. Practicality of Good Theories -- 5.1.2. Process of Knowledge-Building -- 5.1.3. General Criminological Explanations of Cybercrime -- 5.2. Classical/Choice Theory -- 5.2.1. Rational Choice Theory -- 5.2.2. General Deterrence Theory -- Cyber Tale 5.1. People Can and Sometimes Do Choose to Change Their Criminal Ways -- 5.2.3. Routine Activities Theory -- 5.3. Trait Theory -- Box 5.1. Major Strengths and Limitations of Classical Criminology -- 5.3.1. Arousal Theory -- 5.3.2. Cognitive Theory -- 5.3.3. Behavioral Theory -- 5.4. Social Process Theory -- Box 5.2. Major Strengths and Limitations of Trait Theories -- 5.4.1. Social Control Theories -- 5.4.2. Social Learning Theories -- 5.4.3. Neutralization Theory -- 5.4.4. Labeling Theory -- 5.4.5. Differential Enforcement -- Box 5.3. Major Strengths and Limitations of Social Process Theories -- Cyber Tale 5.2. Negative Labels as Badges of Honor -- 5.5. Social Structure Theory -- 5.5.1. General Social Structure Theory -- 5.5.2. Social Disorganization Theory -- 5.5.3. Strain Theories -- 5.5.4. Cultural Deviance Theory -- 5.6. Conflict Theory -- Box 5.4. Major Strengths and Limitations of Social Structure Theories -- 5.6.1. General Conflict Theory -- 5.6.2. Marxist Criminology -- Cyber Case 5.1. Case of Unabomber Ted Kaczynski -- Cyber Case 5.2. Presidential Pardoning of Financier Mark Rich -- 5.6.3. Other Conflict Theories of Crime -- Cyber Case 5.3. Making an Example of Martha Stewart? -- 5.7. Integrated and Technological Theories -- 5.7.1. Overview of Integrated Theories -- Box 5.5. Major Strengths and Weaknesses of Conflict Theory -- Cyber Tale 5.3. Which Theories Help Explain This Criminal Behavior? -- 5.7.2. Technology-Enabled Crime, Policing, and Security -- Cyber Case 5.4. New Crime: Fictitious Characters Socially Engineer Real-World Stabbing -- Box 5.6. Strengths and Limitations of Integrated and Technological Theories -- 6. Social and Economic Impacts of Cybercrime -- 6.0. Introduction: Who Is Harmed and by How Much Cybercrime? -- 6.1. Human and Financial Costs of Computer Abuse and Cybercrime -- 6.1.1. Victimization Concepts -- Cyber Tale 6.1. How Victimization Can Lead to Cybercrime -- 6.1.2. Harm Experienced by Victims of Cybercrime -- Cyber Case 6.1. Cybercrime as Nonviolent Property Crime -- 6.2. How Much Cybercrime Is There? -- 6.2.1. Primary Means of Generating Crime Statistics -- Cyber Tale 6.2. Examination of Early Uniform Crime Reports -- 6.2.2. Overview of Major IT-Enabled Abuse and Crime Studies -- 6.2.3. Research by U.S. Organizations that Track Cybercrime
6.2.4. Economic Estimates and Impact Studies of Cybercrime -- Cyber Tale 6.3. Worldwide Online Auction Scam -- Cyber Tale 6.4. What Are the Economic Impacts of Spam? -- 6.3. Why Research the Nature and Extent of Cybercrime? -- 6.3.1. General State of Research on Cybercrime -- 6.3.2. Types of Research Needed on Cybercrime -- 7. Emerging and Controversial Cybercrime Issues -- 7.0. Introduction: How is IT Creating New Opportunities for Cybercrime? -- 7.1. Emerging Potential for IT-Enabled Abuse and Cybercrime -- 7.1.1. Transformations in Academic Education and Professional Training -- 7.1.2. Online Banking and E-Commerce -- Cyber Tale 7.1. Benefits and Risks of Online Auctions -- 7.1.3. Meeting and Courting Significant Others Online -- 7.1.4. IT-Enabled Democratization -- Cyber Tale 7.2. Obsessive Cyber Spooning Love Affair -- 7.2. Controversial Cybercrime-Related Issues -- 7.2.1. Computer Hacker Subculture -- Cyber Tale 7.3. How the Movie Hackers Inspired One Student to Abuse Computers -- 7.2.2. Open Source Community -- Box 7.1. Death of Cyberpunk -- 7.2.3. Electronic Gaming Enclaves -- 7.2.4. Online Pornography -- 7.2.5. Information Privacy Protections and Infringement -- Box 7.2. Discredited Study on the Amount of Internet Pornography -- Box 7.3. Real-Time Electronic Surveillance, Tracking, and Recording Capabilities Relative to Behavioral, Investigative, and Security Functions -- Box 7.4. Basic Principles for Safeguarding Information Privacy -- Part 3. Managing Cybercrime -- 8. Cyber Laws and Regulations -- 8.0. Introduction: How Does Society Prohibit Cybercrime? -- 8.1. Rationale and Reach of Cyber Laws and Regulations -- 8.1.1. Legal Philosophies -- 8.1.2. Concepts of Due Process and Legal Jurisprudence -- 8.1.3. International Agreements for Managing Cybercrime -- Box 8.1. Determining Jurisdiction in Cyber Suits: Zippo Manufacturing v. Zippo.com -- Cyber Case 8.1. Operation Buccaneer Targets International Warez Groups -- 8.2. Bodies of Law Pertaining to IT and Cybercrime Issues -- Cyber Case 8.2. International Computer Gaming Bust -- 8.2.1. Constitutional Law and Case Law -- Box 8.2. U.S. Constitution and its Amendments -- Cyber Case 8.3. ACLU v. Reno: Striking Down of the Communications Decency Act -- 8.2.2. Criminal Law -- 8.2.3. Administrative and Regulatory Law -- Cyber Case 8.4. Code Writer Faces Federal Prosecution -- 8.2.4. Intellectual Property (IP) Law -- 8.2.5. Tort Law -- Box 8.3. Types of Intellectual Property Law Protections -- 8.3. How Laws and Regulations Are Created and Administered -- 8.3.1. Legislative Bills and Executive Approval -- 8.3.2. Implementation and Enforcement of Laws and Regulations -- 8.3.3. Federal Regulatory Agencies with InfoSec Oversight Responsibilities -- 8.4. Key Federal Cybercrime Laws and Information Security Regulations -- 8.4.1. Laws Specifying Illegal Use of Computers and Electronic Devices -- 8.4.2. Laws that Facilitate or Limit Cybercrime Investigations -- 8.4.3. Laws Protecting Children from Online Pornography -- 8.4.4. Laws Specifying Information Security Requirements -- 8.4.5. Laws Affording Privacy Protections -- 9. Investigating and Prosecuting Cybercrime -- 9.0. Introduction: What Happens When Cybercrime Laws Are Broken? -- 9.1. Collaborative Criminal Justice System Responses to Cybercrime -- 9.1.1. Roles of Public Law Enforcement and Private Security -- 9.1.2. Dedicated Cybercrime Investigation and Prosecution Units -- 9.1.3. Key Investigative and Technical Assistance Agencies -- 9.2. Legal Issues Governing Investigative Procedures -- 9.2.1. Evidentiary Challenges Faced by Investigators and Prosecutors -- 9.2.2. Physical and Cyber Monitoring, Surveillance, and Investigative Operations -- Box 9.1. Mapp v. Ohio Results in Nationwide Exclusionary Rule -- 9.3. Crime Scene Processing and Evidence Management -- 9.3.1. Responding to and Protecting the Crime Scene -- Box 9.2. Typical Crime Scene Processing Equipment -- Cyber Tale 9.1. Searching for Physical and Electronic Evidence of Counterfeiting -- 9.3.2. Collecting and Preserving Physical and Electronic Evidence -- Box 9.3. Controversy and Evidentiary Challenges of Child Porn Morphing -- Cyber Case 9.1. Challenge of Putting a Cybercriminal Behind a Keyboard -- 9.3.3. Interviewing Victims, Witnesses, and Cybercriminals -- 9.4. Prosecuting Cybercriminals -- 9.4.1. Pretrial Procedures and Hearings -- 9.4.2. Trial Procedures and the Art of Presenting Evidence -- 9.4.3. Trial Verdicts, Sentencing Policies, and Appeals -- 10. Preventing Cybercrime with Information Security -- 10.0. Introduction: How Can We Better Protect our Computer Systems and Data? -- 10.1. Personal and Organizational Information Security -- 10.1.1. What Every Person Should Know about Information Security -- Cyber Tale 10.1. Security Lesson about Purchasing Inferior Technology -- Cyber Tale 10.2. Case of Sloppy Password Administration -- Cyber Tale 10.3. Software Firewall Programs May Not Provide Complete Protection -- Cyber Tale 10.4. Importance of Patch Management -- Cyber Tale 10.5. Backup Data Only on Trusted Media! -- Cyber Tale 10.6. Broadband Connectivity: Learn to be a Savvy ISP Customer -- Cyber Tale 10.7. Avoid Being Swindled in Online Auction Fraud -- Cyber Tale 10.8. Security Conscious Traveling Executive -- 10.1.2. Assuring Protection of Information in Organizations -- 10.2. Advancing the Security Posture of Organizations -- 10.2.1. Security Change Procedures -- 10.2.2. Risk Management -- Box 10.1. Due Care and Diligence -- Cyber Tale 10.9. Need for Computer Use and Security Policies -- 11. Future Opportunities for Managing Cybercrime -- 11.0. Introduction: Where Can We Go from Here? -- 11.1. What More Can Government Do to Prevent Cybercrime? -- 11.1.1. Preparing to Manage Cybercrime -- Box 11.1. Actions Government Can Take to Prevent and Control Cybercrime, Improve Information Security Capabilities Nationally, and Protect Critical Information Infrastructure -- 11.1.2. Getting Set and Moving Forward -- Cyber Tale 11.1. Information Insecurity at ChoicePoint -- 11.2. Computer Ethics Education and Intolerance of Cybercrime -- 11.2.1. Philosophy of Ethics -- Box 11.2. Get Ahead by Joining a Professional Membership Association -- Box 11.3. Not Everyone Likes Using Computers -- 11.2.2. Classical Ethics Theories -- Cyber Tale 11.2. Unethical Employment Practices: Don't Get Burned! -- 11.2.3. Computer Ethics -- Box 11.4. Is It Ethical to Use a Work Computer for Personal Reasons? -- Appendix. Cyber Stakeholders and Online Resources
Bibliography Includes bibliographical references
Subject Computer crimes.
Computer crimes -- United States -- Prevention.
LC no. 2005053083
ISBN 020543973X