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Book

Title Introduction to networks : companion guide / Cisco Networking Academy
Published Indianapolis, Indiana : Cisco Press, [2014]

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Description xxxii, 681 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Series Cisco Networking Academy series
Cisco Networking Academy Program series.
Contents Contents note continued: Address Schemes (2.3) -- Ports and Addresses (2.3.1) -- IP Addressing of Devices (2.3.1.1) -- Interfaces and Ports (2.3.1.2) -- Addressing Devices (2.3.2) -- Configuring a Switch Virtual Interface (2.3.2.1) -- Manual IP Address Configuration for End Devices (2.3.2.2) -- Automatic IP Address Configuration for End Devices (2.3.2.3) -- IP Address Conflicts (2.3.2.4) -- Verifying Connectivity (2.3.3) -- Test the Loopback Address on an End Device (2.3.3.1) -- Testing the Interface Assignment (2.3.3.2) -- Testing End-to-End Connectivity (2.3.3.3) -- Summary (2.4) -- Practice -- Class Activities -- Labs -- Packet Tracer Activities -- Check Your Understanding -- ch. 3 Network Protocols and Communications -- Objectives -- Key Terms -- Introduction (3.0.1.1) -- Rules of Communication (3.1) -- The Rules (3.1.1) -- What Is Communication? (3.1.1.1) -- Establishing the Rules (3.1.1.2) -- Message Encoding (3.1.1.3) -- Message Formatting and Encapsulation (3.1.1.4) --
Contents note continued: Cisco IOS Modes of Operation (2.1.3.1) -- Primary Modes (2.1.3.2) -- Global Configuration Mode and Submodes (2.1.3.3) -- Navigating Between IOS Modes (2.1.3.4, 2.1.3.5) -- The Command Structure (2.1.4) -- IOS Command Structure (2.1.4.1) -- Cisco IOS Command Reference (2.1.4.2) -- Context-Sensitive Help (2.1.4.3) -- Command Syntax Check (2.1.4.4) -- Hot Keys and Shortcuts (2.1.4.5) -- IOS Examination Commands (2.1.4.6) -- The show version Command (2.1.4.7) -- Getting Basic (2.2) -- Host Names (2.2.1) -- Why the Switch (2.2.1.1) -- Device Names (2.2.1.2) -- Host Names (2.2.1.3) -- Configuring Host Names (2.2.1.4) -- Limiting Access to Device Configurations (2.2.2) -- Securing Device Access (2.2.2.1) -- Securing Privileged EXEC Access (2.2.2.2) -- Securing User EXEC Access (2.2.2.3) -- Encrypting Password Display (2.2.2.4) -- Banner Messages (2.2.2.5) -- Saving Configurations (2.2.3) -- Configuration Files (2.2.3.1) -- Capturing Text (2.2.3.2) --
Contents note continued: Communicating the Messages (3.3.1.1) -- Protocol Data Units (PDU) (3.3.1.2) -- Encapsulation (3.3.1.3) -- Deencapsulation (3.3.1.4) -- Accessing Local Resources (3.3.2) -- Network Addresses and Data-Link Addresses (3.3.2.1) -- Communicating with a Device on the Same Network (3.3.2.2) -- MAC and IP Addresses (3.3.2.3) -- Accessing Remote Resources (3.3.3) -- Default Gateway (3.3.3.1) -- Communicating with a Device on a Remote Network (3.3.3.2) -- Summary (3.4) -- Practice -- Class Activities -- Labs -- Packet Tracer Activities -- Check Your Understanding -- ch. 4 Network Access -- Objectives -- Key Terms -- Introduction (4.0.1.1) -- Physical Layer Protocols (4.1) -- Getting It Connected (4.1.1) -- Connecting to the Network (4.1.1.1) -- Network Interface Cards (4.1.1.2) -- Purpose of the Physical Layer (4.1.2) -- The Physical Layer (4.1.2.1) -- Physical Layer Media (4.1.2.2) -- Physical Layer Standards (4.1.2.3) --
Contents note continued: Configuring the Integrated Router (11.5.2.1) -- Enabling Wireless (11.5.2.2) -- Configure a Wireless Client (11.5.2.3) -- Summary (11.6) -- Practice -- Class Activities -- Labs -- Packet Tracer Activities -- Check Your Understanding Questions
Contents note continued: Contention-Based Access (4.4.3.3) -- Multiaccess Topology (4.4.3.4) -- Controlled Access (4.4.3.5) -- Ring Topology (4.4.3.6) -- Data-Link Frame (4.4.4) -- The Frame (4.4.4.1) -- The Header (4.4.4.2) -- Layer 2 Address (4.4.4.3) -- The Trailer (4.4.4.4) -- LAN and WAN Frames (4.4.4.5) -- Ethernet Frame (4.4.4.6) -- PPP Frame (4.4.4.7) -- 802.11 Wireless Frame (4.4.4.8) -- Summary (4.5) -- Practice -- Class Activities -- Labs -- Packet Tracer Activities -- Check Your Understanding -- ch. 5 Ethernet -- Objectives -- Key Terms -- Introduction (5.0.1.1) -- Ethernet Protocol (5.1) -- Ethernet Operation (5.1.1) -- LLC and MAC Sublayers (5.1.1.1) -- MAC Sublayer (5.1.1.2) -- Media Access Control (5.1.1.3) -- MAC Address: Ethernet Identity (5.1.1.4) -- Frame Processing (5.1.1.5) -- Ethernet Frame Attributes (5.1.2) -- Ethernet Encapsulation (5.1.2.1) -- Ethernet Frame Size (5.1.2.2) -- Introduction to the Ethernet Frame (5.1.2.3) -- Ethernet MAC (5.1.3) --
Contents note continued: Data Centers (1.4.1.6) -- Technology Trends in the Home (1.4.2.1) -- Powerline Networking (1.4.2.2) -- Wireless Broadband (1.4.2.3) -- Wireless Internet Service Provider (WISP) -- Wireless Broadband Service -- Security Threats (1.4.3.1) -- Security Solutions (1.4.3.2) -- Cisco Network Architectures (1.4.4.1) -- CCNA (1.4.4.2) -- Summary (1.5) -- Practice -- Class Activities -- Labs -- Packet Tracer Activities -- Check Your Understanding -- ch. 2 Configuring a Network Operating System -- Objectives -- Key Terms -- Introduction (2.0.1) -- Introduction to Cisco IOS (2.0.1.1) -- IOS Boot Camp (2.1) -- Cisco IOS (2.1.1) -- Operating Systems (2.1.1.1) -- Purpose of OS (2.1.1.2) -- Location of the Cisco IOS (2.1.1.3) -- IOS Functions (2.1.1.4) -- Accessing a Cisco IOS Device (2.1.2) -- Console Access Method (2.1.2.1) -- Telnet, SSH, and AUX Access Methods (2.1.2.2) -- Terminal Emulation Programs (2.1.2.3) -- Navigating the IOS (2.1.3) --
Contents note continued: Fixed Versus Modular Configuration (5.3.2.1) -- Module Options for Cisco Switch Slots (5.3.2.2) -- Layer 3 Switching (5.3.3) -- Layer 2 Versus Layer 3 Switching (5.3.3.1) -- Cisco Express Forwarding (5.3.3.2) -- Types of Layer 3 Interfaces (5.3.3.3) -- Configuring a Routed Port on a Layer 3 Switch (5.3.3.4) -- Summary (5.4) -- Practice -- Class Activities -- Labs -- Packet Tracer Activities -- Check Your Understanding -- ch. 6 Network Layer -- Objectives -- Key Terms -- Introduction (6.0.1.1) -- Network Layer Protocols (6.1) -- Network Layer in Communication (6.1.1) -- The Network Layer (6.1.1.1) -- Network Layer Protocols (6.1.1.2) -- Characteristics of the IP Protocol (6.1.2) -- Characteristics of IP (6.1.2.1) -- IP---Connectionless (6.1.2.2) -- IP---Best-Effort Delivery (6.1.2.3) -- IP---Media Independent (6.1.2.4) -- Encapsulating IP (6.1.2.5) -- IPv4 Packet (6.1.3) -- IPv4 Packet Header (6.1.3.1) -- IPv4 Header Fields (6.1.3.2) --
Contents note continued: Hypertext Transfer Protocol and Hypertext Markup Language (10.2.1.2) -- HTTP and HTTPS (10.2.1.3) -- SMTP, POP, and IMAP (10.2.1.4-10.2.1.7) -- Providing IP Addressing Services (10.2.2) -- Domain Name System (10.2.2.1) -- DNS Message Format (10.2.2.2) -- DNS Hierarchy (10.2.2.3) -- Nslookup (10.2.2.4) -- Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (10.2.2.6) -- DHCPv4 Operation (10.2.2.7) -- Providing File-Sharing Services (10.2.3) -- File Transfer Protocol (10.2.3.1) -- Server Message Block (10.2.3.4) -- The Message Heard Around the World (10.3) -- Move It! (10.3.1) -- The Internet of Things (10.3.1.1) -- Message Travels Through a Network (10.3.1.2) -- Getting the Data to the End Device (10.3.1.3) -- Getting the Data Through the Internetwork (10.3.1.4) -- Getting the Data to the Right Application (10.3.1.5) -- Warriors of the Net (10.3.1.6) -- Summary (10.4) -- Practice -- Class Activities -- Labs -- Packet Tracer Activities -- Check Your Understanding --
Contents note continued: ICMP (8.3.1) -- ICMPv4 and ICMPv6 Messages (8.3.1.1) -- ICMPv6 Router Solicitation and Router Advertisement Messages (8.3.1.2) -- ICMPv6 Neighbor Solicitation and Neighbor Advertisement Messages (8.3.1.3) -- Testing and Verification (8.3.2) -- Ping: Testing the Local Stack (8.3.2.1) -- Ping: Testing Connectivity to the Local LAN (8.3.2.2) -- Ping: Testing Connectivity to Remote (8.3.2.3) -- Traceroute: Testing the Path (8.3.2.4) -- Summary (8.4) -- Practice -- Class Activities -- Labs -- Packet Tracer Activities -- Check Your Understanding -- ch. 9 Subnetting IP Networks -- Objectives -- Key Terms -- Introduction (9.0.1.1) -- Subnetting an IPv4 Network (9.1) -- Network Segmentation (9.1.1) -- Reasons for Subnetting (9.1.1.1) -- Communication Between Subnets (9.1.1.2) -- IP Subnetting Is FUNdamental (9.1.2) -- The Plan (9.1.2.1) -- The Plan: Address Assignment (9.1.2.2) -- Subnetting an IPv4 Network (9.1.3) -- Basic Subnetting (9.1.3.1) --
Contents note continued: IPv6 Address Representation (8.2.2.2) -- Rule 1: Omit Leading 0s (8.2.2.3) -- Rule 2: Omit All 0 Segments (8.2.2.4) -- Types of IPv6 Addresses (8.2.3) -- IPv6 Address Types (8.2.3.1) -- IPv6 Prefix Length (8.2.3.2) -- IPv6 Unicast Addresses (8.2.3.3) -- IPv6 Link-Local Unicast Addresses (8.2.3.4) -- IPv6 Unicast Addresses (8.2.4) -- Structure of an IPv6 Global Unicast Address (8.2.4.1) -- Static Configuration of a Global Unicast Address (8.2.4.2) -- Dynamic Configuration of a Global Unicast Address Using SLAAC (8.2.4.3) -- Dynamic Configuration of a Global Unicast Address Using DHCPv6 (8.2.4.4) -- EUI-64 Process or Randomly Generated (8.2.4.5) -- Dynamic Link-Local Addresses (8.2.4.6) -- Static Link-Local Addresses (8.2.4.7) -- Verifying IPv6 Address Configuration (8.2.4.8) -- IPv6 Multicast Addresses (8.2.5) -- Assigned IPv6 Multicast Addresses (8.2.5.1) -- Solicited-Node IPv6 Multicast Addresses (8.2.5.2) -- Connectivity Verification (8.3) --
Contents note continued: IPv6 Subnet Allocation (9.3.1.2) -- Subnetting into the Interface ID (9.3.1.3) -- Summary (9.4) -- Practice -- Class Activities -- Labs -- Packet Tracer Activities -- Check Your Understanding -- ch. 10 Application Layer -- Objectives -- Key Terms -- Introduction (10.0.1.1) -- Application Layer Protocols (10.1) -- Application, Session, and Presentation (10.1.1) -- OSI and TCP/IP Models Revisited (10.1.1.1) -- Application Layer (10.1.1.2) -- Presentation and Session Layers (10.1.1.3) -- TCP/IP Application Layer Protocols (10.1.1.4) -- How Application Protocols Interact with End-User Applications (10.1.2) -- Peer-to-Peer Networks (10.1.2.1) -- Peer-to-Peer Applications (10.1.2.2) -- Common P2P Applications (10.1.2.3) -- Client-Server Model (10.1.2.5) -- Well-Known Application Layer Protocols and Services (10.2) -- Common Application Layer Protocols (10.2.1) -- Application Layer Protocols Revisited (10.2.1.1) --
Contents note continued: MAC Addresses and Hexadecimal (5.1.3.1) -- MAC Address Representations (5.1.3.2) -- Unicast MAC Address (5.1.3.3) -- Broadcast MAC Address (5.1.3.4) -- Multicast MAC Address (5.1.3.5) -- MAC and IP (5.1.4, 5.1.4.1) -- End-to-End Connectivity, MAC, and IP (5.1.4.2) -- Address Resolution Protocol (5.2, 5.2.1, 5.2.1.1) -- ARP Functions (5.2.1.2) -- ARP Operation (5.2.1.3) -- ARP Role in Remote Communication (5.2.1.4) -- Removing Entries from an ARP Table (5.2.1.5) -- ARP Tables on Networking Devices (5.2.1.6) -- ARP Issues (5.2.2) -- How ARP Can Create Problems (5.2.2.1) -- Mitigating ARP Problems (5.2.2.2) -- LAN Switches (5.3) -- Switching (5.3.1) -- Switch Port Fundamentals (5.3.1.1) -- Switch MAC Address Table (5.3.1.2) -- Duplex Settings (5.3.1.3) -- Auto-MDIX (5.3.1.4) -- Frame-Forwarding Methods on Cisco Switches (5.3.1.5) -- Cut-Through Switching (5.3.1.6) -- Memory Buffering on Switches (5.3.1.8) -- Fixed or Modular (5.3.2) --
Contents note continued: Message Size (3.1.1.5) -- Message Timing (3.1.1.6) -- Message Delivery Options (3.1.1.7) -- Network Protocols and Standards (3.2) -- Protocols (3.2.1) -- Protocols: Rules That Govern Communications (3.2.1.1) -- Network Protocols (3.2.1.2) -- Interaction of Protocols (3.2.1.3) -- Protocol Suites (3.2.2) -- Protocol Suites and Industry Standards (3.2.2.1) -- Creation of the Internet and Development of TCP/IP (3.2.2.2) -- TCP/IP Protocol Suite and Communication Process (3.2.2.3) -- Standards Organizations (3.2.3) -- Open Standards (3.2.3.1) -- ISOC, IAB, and IETF (3.2.3.2) -- IEEE (3.2.3.3) -- ISO (3.2.3.4) -- Other Standards Organizations (3.2.3.5) -- Reference Models (3.2.4) -- The Benefits of Using a Layered Model (3.2.4.1) -- The OSI Reference Model (3.2.4.2) -- The TCP/IP Protocol Model (3.2.4.3) -- Comparing the OSI Model with the TCP/IP Model (3.2.4.4) -- Moving Data in the Network (3.3) -- Data Encapsulation (3.3.1) --
Contents note continued: Network Portion and Host Portion of an IPv4 Address (8.1.2.1) -- Examining the Prefix Length (8.1.2.2) -- IPv4 Network, Host, and Broadcast Addresses (8.1.2.3) -- First Host and Last Host Addresses (8.1.2.4) -- Bitwise AND Operation (8.1.2.5) -- Importance of ANDing (8.1.2.6) -- IPv4 Unicast, Broadcast, and Multicast (8.1.3) -- Assigning a Static IPv4 Address to a Host (8.1.3.1) -- Assigning a Dynamic IPv4 Address to a Host (8.1.3.2) -- Unicast Transmission (8.1.3.3) -- Broadcast Transmission (8.1.3.4) -- Multicast Transmission (8.1.3.5) -- Types of IPv4 Addresses (8.1.4) -- Public and Private IPv4 Addresses (8.1.4.1) -- Special-Use IPv4 Addresses (8.1.4.3) -- Legacy Classful Addressing (8.1.4.4) -- Assignment of IP Addresses (8.1.4.5, 8.1.4.6) -- IPv6 Network Addresses (8.2) -- IPv4 Issues (8.2.1) -- The Need for IPv6 (8.2.1.1) -- IPv4 and IPv6 Coexistence (8.2.1.2) -- IPv6 Addressing (8.2.2) -- Hexadecimal Number System (8.2.2.1) --
Contents note continued: Router Backplane (6.3.1.5) -- Connecting to a Router (6.3.1.6) -- LAN and WAN Interfaces (6.3.1.7) -- Router Bootup (6.3.2) -- Cisco IOS (6.3.2.1) -- Bootset Files (6.3.2.2) -- Router Bootup Process (6.3.2.3) -- Show Version Output (6.3.2.4) -- Configuring a Cisco Router (6.4) -- Configure Initial Settings (6.4.1) -- Router Configuration Steps (6.4.1.1) -- Configure Interfaces (6.4.2) -- Configure LAN Interfaces (6.4.2.1) -- Verify Interface Configuration (6.4.2.2) -- Configuring the Default Gateway (6.4.3) -- Default Gateway on a Host (6.4.3.1) -- Default Gateway on a Switch (6.4.3.2) -- Summary (6.5) -- Practice -- Class Activities -- Labs -- Packet Tracer Activities -- Check Your Understanding -- ch. 7 Transport Layer -- Objectives -- Key Terms -- Introduction (7.0.1.1) -- Learning Objectives -- Transport Layer Protocols (7.1) -- Transportation of Data (7.1.1) -- Role of the Transport Layer (7.1.1.1, 7.1.1.2) -- Conversation Multiplexing (7.1.1.3) --
Contents note continued: Sample IPv4 Headers (6.1.3.3) -- IPv6 Packet (6.1.4) -- Limitations of IPv4 (6.1.4.1) -- Introducing IPv6 (6.1.4.2) -- Encapsulating IPv6 (6.1.4.3) -- IPv6 Packet Header (6.1.4.4) -- Sample IPv6 Header (6.1.4.5) -- Routing (6.2) -- How a Host Routes (6.2.1) -- Host Forwarding Decision (6.2.1.1) -- Default Gateway (6.2.1.2) -- IPv4 Host Routing Table (6.2.1.3) -- IPv4 Host Routing Entries (6.2.1.4) -- Sample IPv4 Host Routing Table (6.2.1.5) -- Sample IPv6 Host Routing Table (6.2.1.6) -- Router Routing Tables (6.2.2) -- Router Packet-Forwarding Decision (6.2.2.1) -- IPv4 Router Routing Table (6.2.2.2) -- Directly Connected Routing Table Entries (6.2.2.3) -- Remote Network Routing Table Entries (6.2.2.4) -- Next-Hop Address (6.2.2.5) -- Sample Router IPv4 Routing Table (6.2.2.6) -- Routers (6.3) -- Anatomy of a Router (6.3.1) -- A Router Is a Computer (6.3.1.1) -- Router CPU and OS (6.3.1.2) -- Router Memory (6.3.1.3) -- Inside a Router (6.3.1.4) --
Contents note continued: Subnets in Use (9.1.3.2) -- Subnetting Formulas (9.1.3.3) -- Creating Four Subnets (9.1.3.4) -- Creating Eight Subnets (9.1.3.5) -- Creating 100 Subnets with a /16 prefix (9.1.3.10) -- Calculating the Hosts (9.1.3.11) -- Calculating the Hosts (9.1.3.12) -- Determining the Subnet Mask (9.1.4) -- Subnetting Based on Host Requirements (9.1.4.1) -- Subnetting Network-Based Requirements (9.1.4.2) -- Subnetting to Meet Network Requirements (9.1.4.3, 9.1.4.4) -- Benefits of Variable-Length Subnet Masking (9.1.5) -- Traditional Subnetting Wastes Addresses (9.1.5.1) -- Variable-Length Subnet Masks (VLSM) (9.1.5.2) -- Basic VLSM (9.1.5.3) -- VLSM in Practice (9.1.5.4) -- VLSM Chart (9.1.5.5) -- Addressing Schemes (9.2) -- Structured Design (9.2.1) -- Planning to Address the Network (9.2.1.1) -- Assigning Addresses to Devices (9.2.1.2) -- Design Considerations for IPv6 (9.3) -- Subnetting an IPv6 Network (9.3.1) -- Subnetting Using the Subnet ID (9.3.1.1) --
Contents note continued: TCP Reliability---Data Loss and Retransmission (7.2.2.3) -- TCP Flow Control---Window Size and Acknowledgements (7.2.2.4) -- TCP Flow Control---Congestion Avoidance (7.2.2.5) -- UDP Communication (7.2.3) -- UDP Low Overhead Versus Reliability (7.2.3.1) -- UDP Datagram Reassembly (7.2.3.2) -- UDP Server Processes and Requests (7.2.3.3) -- UDP Client Processes (7.2.3.4) -- TCP or UDP, That Is the Question (7.2.4) -- Applications That Use TCP (7.2.4.1) -- Applications That Use UDP (7.2.4.2) -- Summary (7.3) -- Practice -- Class Activities -- Labs -- Packet Tracer Activities -- Check Your Understanding -- ch. 8 IP Addressing -- Objectives -- Key Terms -- Introduction (8.0.1.1) -- IPv4 Network Addresses (8.1) -- IPv4 Address Structure (8.1.1) -- Binary Notation (8.1.1.1) -- Binary Number System (8.1.1.2) -- Converting a Binary Address to Decimal (8.1.1.3) -- Converting from Decimal to Binary (8.1.1.5, 8.1.1.6) -- IPv4 Subnet Mask (8.1.2) --
Contents note continued: The Internet (1.2.3, 1.2.3.1) -- Intranet and Extranet (1.2.3.2) -- Internet Access Technologies (1.2.4.1) -- Connecting Remote Users to the Internet (1.2.4.2) -- Connecting Businesses to the Internet (1.2.4.3) -- The Network as a Platform (1.3) -- The Converging Network (1.3.1.1) -- Planning for the Future (1.3.1.2) -- The Supporting Network Architecture (1.3.2.1) -- Fault Tolerance in Circuit-Switched Networks (1.3.2.2) -- Fault Tolerance -- Circuit-Switched Connection-Oriented Networks -- Fault Tolerance in Packet-Switched Networks (1.3.2.3) -- Packet-Switched Networks -- Scalable Networks (1.3.2.4) -- Scalability -- Providing QoS (1.3.2.5) -- Quality of Service -- Providing Network Security (1.3.2.6) -- Security -- The Changing Network Environment (1.4) -- Network Trends (1.4.1) -- New Trends (1.4.1.1) -- Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) (1.4.1.2) -- Online Collaboration (1.4.1.3) -- Video Communication (1.4.1.4) -- Cloud Computing (1.4.1.5) --
Contents note continued: Transport Layer Reliability (7.1.1.4) -- TCP (7.1.1.5) -- UDP (7.1.1.6) -- The Right Transport Layer Protocol for the Right Application (7.1.1.7) -- Introducing TCP and UDP (7.1.2) -- Introducing TCR (7.1.2.1) -- Role of TCP (7.1.2.2) -- Introducing UDP (7.1.2.3) -- Role of UDP (7.1.2.4) -- Separating Multiple Communications (7.1.2.5) -- TCP and UDP Port Addressing (7.1.2.6 -- 7.1.2.9) -- TCP and UDP Segmentation (7.1.2.10) -- TCP and UDP (7.2) -- TCP Communication (7.2.1) -- TCP Reliable Delivery (7.2.1.1) -- TCP Server Processes (7.2.1.2) -- TCP Connection Establishment and Termination (7.2.1.3) -- TCP Three-Way Handshake Analysis---Step 1 (7.2.1.4) -- TCP Three-Way Handshake Analysis---Step 2 (7.2.1.5) -- TCP Three-Way Handshake Analysis---Step 3 (7.2.1.6) -- TCP Session Termination Analysis (7.2.1.7) -- Reliability and Flow Control (7.2.2) -- TCP Reliability---Ordered Delivery (7.2.2.1) -- TCP Reliability---Acknowledgement and Window Size (7.2.2.2) --
Contents note continued: Types of Security Vulnerabilities (11.2.1.3) -- Vulnerabilities and Network Attacks (11.2.2) -- Viruses, Worms, and Trojan Horses (11.2.2.1) -- Reconnaissance Attacks (11.2.2.2) -- Access Attacks (11.2.2.3) -- DoS Attacks (11.2.2.4) -- Mitigating Network Attacks (11.2.3) -- Backup, Upgrade, Update, and Patch (11.2.3.1) -- Authentication, Authorization, and Accounting (11.2.3.2) -- Firewalls (11.2.3.3) -- Endpoint Security (11.2.3.4) -- Securing Devices (11.2.4) -- Introduction to Securing Devices (11.2.4.1) -- Passwords (11.2.4.2) -- Basic Security Practices (11.2.4.3) -- Enable SSH (11.2.4.4) -- Basic Network Performance (11.3) -- Ping (11.3.1) -- Interpreting Ping Results (11.3.1.1) -- Extended Ping (11.3.1.2) -- Network Baseline (11.3.1.3) -- Tracert (11.3.2) -- Interpreting Tracert Messages (11.3.2.1) -- Show Commands (11.3.3) -- Common Show Commands Revisited (11.3.3.1) -- Viewing Router Settings with the show version Command (11.3.3.2) --
Contents note continued: Types of Wireless Media (4.2.4.2) -- Wireless LAN (4.2.4.3) -- 802.11 Wi-Fi Standards (4.2.4.4) -- Data Link Layer Protocols (4.3) -- Purpose of the Data Link Layer (4.3.1) -- The Data Link Layer (4.3.1.1) -- Data Link Sublayers (4.3.1.2) -- Media Access Control (4.3.1.3) -- Providing Access to Media (4.3.1.4) -- Layer 2 Frame Structure (4.3.2) -- Formatting Data for Transmission (4.3.2.1) -- Creating a Frame (4.3.2.2) -- Layer 2 Standards (4.3.3) -- Data Link Layer Standards (4.3.3.1) -- Media Access Control (4.4) -- Topologies (4.4.1) -- Controlling Access to the Media (4.4.1.1) -- Physical and Logical Topologies (4.4.1.2) -- WAN Topologies (4.4.2) -- Common Physical WAN Topologies (4.4.2.1) -- Physical Point-to-Point Topology) (4.4.2.2) -- Logical Point-to-Point Topology (4.4.2.3) -- Half and Full Duplex (4.4.2.4) -- LAN Topologies (4.4.3) -- Physical LAN Topologies (4.4.3.1) -- Logical Topology for Shared Media (4.4.3.2) --
Contents note continued: Viewing Switch Settings with the show version Command (11.3.3.3) -- Host and IOS Commands (11.3.4) -- ipconfig Command Options (11.3.4.1) -- arp Command Options (11.3.4.2) -- show cdp neighbors Command Options (11.3.4.3) -- Using the show ip interface brief Command (11.3.4.4) -- Managing iOS Configuration Files (11.4) -- Router and Switch File Systems (11.4.1) -- Router File Systems (11.4.1.1) -- Switch File Systems (11.4.1.2) -- Back Up and Restore Configuration Files (11.4.2) -- Backing Up and Restoring Using Text Files (11.4.2.1) -- Backing Up and Restoring Using TFTP (11.4.2.2) -- Using USB Ports on a Cisco Router (11.4.2.3) -- Backing Up and Restoring Using a USB Flash Drive (11.4.2.4) -- Integrated Routing Services (11.5) -- Integrated Router (11.5.1) -- Multifunction Device (11.5.1.1) -- Types of Integrated Routers (11.5.1.2) -- Wireless Capability (11.5.1.3) -- Basic Security of Wireless (11.5.1.4) -- Configuring the Integrated Router (11.5.2) --
Contents note continued: ch. 11 It's a Network -- Objectives -- Key Terms -- Introduction (11.0.1.1) -- Create and Grow (11.1) -- Devices in a Small Network (11.1.1) -- Small-Network Topologies (11.1.1.1) -- Device Selection for a Small Network (11.1.1.2) -- IP Addressing for a Small Network (11.1.1.3) -- Redundancy in a Small Network (11.1.1.4) -- Design Considerations for a Small Network (11.1.1.5) -- Protocols in a Small Network (11.1.2) -- Common Applications in a Small Network (11.1.2.1) -- Common Protocols in a Small Network (11.1.2.2) -- Real-Time Applications for a Small Network (11.1.2.3) -- Growing to Larger Networks (11.1.3) -- Scaling a Small Network (11.1.3.1) -- Protocol Analysis of a Small Network (11.1.3.2) -- Evolving Protocol Requirements (11.1.3.3) -- Keeping the Network Safe (11.2) -- Network Device Security Measures (11.2.1) -- Categories of Threats to Network Security (11.2.1.1) -- Physical Security (11.2.1.2) --
Contents note continued: Fundamental Principles of Layer 1 (4.1.3) -- Physical Layer Fundamental Principles (4.1.3.1) -- Bandwidth (4.1.3.2) -- Throughput (4.1.3.3) -- Types of Physical Media (4.1.3.4) -- Network Media (4.2) -- Copper Cabling (4.2.1) -- Characteristics of Copper Media (4.2.1.1) -- Copper Media (4.2.1.2) -- Unshielded Twisted-Pair Cable (4.2.1.3) -- Shielded Twisted-Pair (STP) Cable (4.2.1.4) -- Coaxial Cable (4.2.1.5) -- Copper Media Safety (4.2.1.6) -- UTP Cabling (4.2.2) -- Properties of UTP Cabling (4.2.2.1) -- UTP Cabling Standards (4.2.2.2) -- UTP Connectors (4.2.2.3) -- Types of UTP Cable (4.2.2.4) -- Testing UTP Cables (4.2.2.5) -- Fiber-Optic Cabling (4.2.3) -- Properties of Fiber-Optic Cabling (4.2.3.1) -- Fiber Media Cable Design (4.2.3.2) -- Types of Fiber Media (4.2.3.3) -- Network Fiber Connectors (4.2.3.4) -- Testing Fiber Cables (4.2.3.5) -- Fiber Versus Copper (4.2.3.6) -- Wireless Media (4.2.4) -- Properties of Wireless Media (4.2.4.1) --
Machine generated contents note: ch. 1 Exploring the Network -- Objectives -- Key Terms -- Introduction (1.0.1.1) -- Globally Connected (1.1) -- Networking Today (1.1.1) -- Networks in Our Daily Lives (1.1.1.1) -- Technology Then and Now (1.1.1.2) -- The Global Community (1.1.1.3) -- Networks Support the Way We Learn (1.1.1.4) -- Networks Support the Way We Communicate (1.1.1.5) -- Networks Support the Way We Work (1.1.1.6) -- Networks Support the Way We Play (1.1.1.7) -- Providing Resources in a Network (1.1.2) -- Networks of Many Sizes (1.1.2.1) -- Clients and Servers (1.1.2.2, 1.1.2.3) -- Peer-to-Peer (1.1.2.4) -- LANs, WANs, and the Internet (1.2) -- Components of a Network (1.2.1, 1.2.1.1) -- End Devices (1.2.1.2) -- Intermediary Network Devices (1.2.1.3) -- Network Media (1.2.1.4) -- Network Representations (1.2.1.5) -- Topology Diagrams (1.2.1.6) -- LANs and WANs (1.2.2) -- Types of Networks (1.2.2.1) -- Local-Area Networks (1.2.2.2) -- Wide-Area Networks (1.2.2.3) --
Summary "Introduction to Networks Companion Guide is the official supplemental textbook for the Introduction to Networks course in the Cisco® Networking Academy® CCNA® Routing and Switching curriculum. The course introduces the architecture, structure, functions, components, and models of the Internet and computer networks. The principles of IP addressing and fundamentals of Ethernet concepts, media, and operations are introduced to provide a foundation for the curriculum. By the end of the course, you will be able to build simple LANs, perform basic configurations for routers and switches, and implement IP addressing schemes"--Back of book cover
Notes Includes index
Subject Cisco Systems, Inc.
Cisco IOS.
Computer networks -- Examinations -- Study guides.
Computer networks.
Data transmission systems.
Electronic data processing personnel -- Certification -- Study guides.
Local area networks (Computer networks)
Routing (Computer network management)
Genre/Form Study guides.
Author Dye, Mark A., author
Reid, Allan, author
Cisco Networking Academy Program, author
LC no. 2013951541
ISBN 1587133164
9781587133169
Other Titles Networks. Companion guide