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Book
Author Australia. Parliament. Senate. Environment, Recreation, Communications, and the Arts References Committee.

Title Access to heritage : user charges in museums, art galleries and national parks / Senate Environment, Recreation, Communications & the Arts References Committee
Published Canberra : Commonwealth of Australia, 1998

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Location Call no. Vol. Availability
 MELB  353.70994 Aus/Ath  UNAVAILABLE C19
Description xix, 199 pages ; ; 25 cm
Series Parliamentary paper / the Parliament of the Commonwealth of Australia, 0727-4181 ; no. 142 of 1998
Parliamentary paper (Australia. Parliament) ; 1998, no. 142
Contents 1. Introduction -- 2. Overview -- Defining heritage: "things we want to keep" -- Why conserve heritage? -- the right of access to heritage -- User charges in museums, galleries and national parks: the status quo -- Overview of submissions -- 3. Constraints on access -- Much heritage is in private hands -- Poorer people can't access as much as better off people -- Some other constraints on access -- Handicaps of people with disabilities -- Isolation of country people -- Socio-economic status and cultural expectations -- Restricting access for the sake of conservation; 'access by proxy' -- Conflict between different types of access -- Special issues for indigenous people and indigenous heritage -- Comment : rights in principle versus opportunities in practice -- 4. Entry fees : arguments of principle -- 'Entry to public property should be free of charge' -- ... versus 'it is reasonable to charge for private benefits' -- 5. Entry fees : economic efficiency arguments -- 'Fees discourage potential visitors' -- Theory : willingness to pay, consumer surplus & elasticity of demand -- Evidence on elasticity of demand -- 'Price signals promote efficient allocation of resources' -- 'Entry fees may be better than reduced services' -- conclusions of economic efficiency arguments -- 6. Entry fees : equity arguments -- 'Free entry is a subsidy by poorer nongoing taxpayers to richer goers' -- ... versus 'fees disproportionately discourage poorer people' -- Are entry fees a wise response to any perceived inequity? -- Alternatives -- 7. User charges : arguments of detail -- 'Basic access' versus 'value-added services' -- Principles for charging for value-added services -- 'User pays can fund better management' -- ... versus 'user pays allows governments to reduce central funding' -- 'Reliance on user pays diverts attention from core charters' -- Effects of 'user pays' on volunteerism and sponsorship -- Miscellaneous arguments -- 8. Conclusions -- Conclusions on museums and art galleries -- Conclusions on national parks -- Appendices
1. Introduction -- 2. Overview -- Defining heritage: "things we want to keep" -- Why conserve heritage? -- the right of access to heritage -- User charges in museums, galleries and national parks: the status quo -- Overview of submissions -- 3. Constraints on access -- Much heritage is in private hands -- Poorer people cant't access as much as better off people -- Some other constraints on access -- Handicaps of people with disabilities -- Isolation of country people -- Socio-economic status and cultural expectations -- Restriciting access for the sake of conservation; 'access by proxy' -- Conflict between different types of access -- Special issues for indigenous people and indigenous heritage -- Comment : rights in principle versus opportunities in practice -- 4. Entry fees : arguments of principle -- 'Entry to public property should be free of charge' -- ... versus 'it is reasonable to charge for private benefits' -- 5. Entry fees : economic efficiency arguments -- 'Fees discourage potential visitors' -- Theory : willingness to pay, consumer surplus & elasticity of demand -- Evidence on elasticity of demand -- 'Price signals promote efficient allocation of resources' -- 'Entry fees may be better than reduced services' -- conclusions of economic efficiency arguments -- 6. Entry fees : equity arguments -- 'Free entry is a subsidy by poorer nongoing taxpayers to richer goers' -- ... versus 'fees disproportionately discourage poorer people' -- Are entry fees a wise response to any perceived inequity? -- Alternatives -- 7. User charges : arguments of detail -- 'Basic access' versus 'value-added services' -- Principles for charging for value-added services -- 'User pays can fund better management' -- ... versus 'user pays allows governments to reduce central funding' -- 'Reliance on user pays diverts attention from core charters' -- Effects of 'user pays' on volunteerism and sponsorship -- Miscellaneous arguments -- 8. Conclusions -- Conclusions on museums and art galleries -- Conclusions on national parks -- Appendices
Summary This report challenges notions of government as opposed to community ownership, examines economic arguments and is persuaded that, for our cultural institutions at least, on the whole entry charges do discourage would-be visitors. The report discourages commercial development in national parks, warning against the resultant cycle of economic dependence
Analysis Accessibility
Charges
Committees and inquiries
Cost recovery
Equity
Federal issue
Museums and galleries
National Estate
Protected areas
User pays principle
Notes At head of title: Parliament of the Commonwealth of Australia
Chair: Lyn Allison
Includes bibliographical references
Bibliography Includes bibliographical references
Notes Also published as a Parliamentary paper (Australia. Parliament); 142/1998
Commonwealth of Australia 1998
Subject Art museums -- Australia -- Appropriations and expenditures.
Art museums -- Australia.
Expenditures, Public -- Australia.
Expenditures, Public.
Museums -- Australia -- Appropriations and expenditures.
Museums -- Australia.
National parks and reserves -- Public use -- Australia.
National parks and reserves -- Australia -- Appropriations and expenditures.
National parks and reserves -- Australia.
User charges -- Australia.
Author Allison, Lyn.
Australia. Parliament. Senate. Environment, Recreation, Communications and the Arts Reference Committee
LC no. 2002318109
ISSN 0727-4181
ISBN 0642251657