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Streaming video

Title Dateline: Tunnel Vision/Future Fear/Landless
Published Australia : SBS ONE, 2010
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Description 1 streaming video file (52 min. 3 sec.) ; 315899838 bytes
Summary TUNNEL VISIONDateline goes underground into the tunnels beneath the Gaza-Egypt border to follow workers making a living smuggling goods into the Palestinian enclave.It has to be one of the world's worst jobs... digging the tunnels under the border between the Gaza Strip and Egypt to smuggle supplies across the border into the Palestinian enclave.With the constant threat of bombs and collapse, French filmmaker Alex Monchovet follows Palestinian tunnel workers as they work in the dead of night to move bag after bag of goods through the narrow winding passageways. The trade continues even though the Israeli blockade has been partially lifted and the crossing from Egypt into Gaza opened since nine activists were killed on a recent peace flotilla. Israel often bombs and destroys the tunnels, but the workers somehow manage to smile through as they build more and keep the goods and their own black market economy moving. FUTURE FEARKiller comets, global tsunamis and super volcanoes might sound like the stuff of science fiction, but some people in the United States are taking such threats to the planet extremely seriously.Video journalist David Brill has been to meet the Kramer family in California, who've already bought space in an underground shelter, ready for the 'cataclysmic disaster' they believe could happen when a 'galactic alignment' takes place in 2012.He also meets shelter owner, Robert Vicino, whose website counts down the seconds to the end of the world, and offers space in his hotel-style solution to survival for tens of thousands of dollars per person.Others are approaching the future differently, believing the biggest threats we're facing are problems that we've caused ourselves. Richard Heinberg is one of the world's foremost peak oil experts, who warns that we're addicted to fossil fuels and must adapt before they run out. David takes us to a Los Angeles suburb to meet the Dervaes family of so-called 'urban homesteaders'. They've already adapted and are living self-sufficiently and almost entirely off-grid.But are they all being over cautious, or will the rest of us be under prepared?LANDLESSThe poor of Cambodia are literally being flooded out of their homes so high-rise developments can be built for the rich.Over a thousand families have already been forced out of one site by rising water, threats and intimidation.Video journalist David O'Shea first reported on Cambodia's land grab in 2009, when people's homes were being bulldozed around them, and now he returns to find little has improved.He meets some people, who've been given unsafe housing with no running water and leaking sewage as 'compensation', and others who've been dumped on uninhabitable land.And he meets the few who are battling adversity and big business to try and get justice
Notes Closed captioning in English
Event Broadcast 2010-09-12 at 20:30:00
Notes Classification: NC
Subject Bombing, Aerial.
Disasters -- Prevention.
End of the world.
Evacuation of civilians.
Floods -- Social aspects.
Tunnels -- Design and construction.
Cambodia.
Middle East.
United States.
Form Streaming video
Author Awad, Abu, contributor
Brill, David, reporter
Dervaes, Anais, contributor
Dervaes, Jordanne, contributor
Dervaes, Jules, contributor
Ghazi, Abu, contributor
Heinberg, Richard, contributor
Keshta, Hiyad, contributor
Kramer, Matthew, contributor
Kramer, Steve, contributor
Monchovet, Alexis, reporter
Negus, George, host
O'Shea, David, reporter
Pred, David, contributor
Saleiman, Abu, contributor
Vicino, Robert, contributor