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Title Clientelism in everyday Latin American Politics
Published Basingstoke : Palgrave Macmillan, 2012
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Description 1 online resource (270 s.) : 3 black and white, halftones, 5
Contents PART I: INTRODUCTION Democratic Processes, Clientelistic Relationships, and the Material Goods Problem -- T. Hilgers PART II: THEORETICAL PERSPECTIVES Favors, 'Merit Ribbons, ' and Services: Analyzing the Fragile Resilience of Clientelism -- L. Roniger What is Politics for? Inequality, Representation, and Needs Satisfaction Under Clientelism and Democracy -- J. Shefner PART III: THE MULTIPLE DYNAMICS OF CLIENTELISM IN LATIN AMERICA Democratic Processes, Patronage Politics, and Contentious Collective Action in El Alto, Bolivia -- P. Lapegna & J. Auyero Clientelism, Democracy, and Violence in Rio de Janeiro -- R. Gay When Clients Become Collective Actors: Participatory Budgeting, Changing Mobilization Patterns and Varieties of Clientelism in Democratizing Recife, Brazil -- F. Montambeault Clientelism and Subnational Politics in Latin America: Reflections on Oaxaca, Mexico and Bahia, Brazil -- J.D. Herrmann Fragmented Clientelism in Montevideo: Training Ground for Community Engagement with Participatory Decentralization -- E. Canel PART IV: PROPOSALS FOR FUTURE DIRECTIONS OF STUDY Clientelistic Democracy or Democratic Clientelism: A Matter of Context -- T. Hilgers State Power and Clientelism: Eight Propositions for Discussion -- J. Fox
Summary This book improves understandings of how and why clientelism endures in Latin America and why state policy is often ineffective. Political scientists and sociologists, the contributors employ ethnography, targeted interviews, case studies, within-case and regional comparison, thick descriptions, and process tracing. In Latin America and beyond, societies are deeply unequal, the poor are marginalized, and states face continuous fiscal shortages and real or potential political instability. In this context, democracy functions imperfectly. It intermeshes with clientelism, with the incongruous result that clientelism not only erodes but also accompanies and supplements democratic processes. Armed with evidence of these complex interactions, this book improves understandings of how and why clientelism endures and why state policy is often ineffective. Political scientists and sociologists, the contributors employ ethnography, targeted interviews, case studies, within-case and regional comparison, thick descriptions, and process tracing. They write from political economy and institutionalist, principal- and agent-centered perspectives
Notes Electronic book text
Epublication based on: 9781137275981, 2012
Tina Hilgers is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at Concordia University, Canada. Her research interests include poor people's politics, clientelism, state-society relations, development, and democracy. Her work has been published in Theory and Society, Politique et Societes, Journal of Iberian and Latin American Research, Latin American Politics and Society, and the Latin American Research Review
Undergraduate
Subject Business and politics -- Latin America.
Patron and client -- Latin America.
Latin America -- Politics and government -- 1980-
Form Electronic book
Author Hilgers, Tina, 1971-
ISBN 1137275995
9781137275998