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E-book
Author Srivastava, Manu

Title Additive Manufacturing : Fundamentals and Advancements
Published Milton : CRC Press LLC, 2019
©2020
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Description 1 online resource (321 pages)
Contents Cover -- Half Title -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Table of Contents -- List of Figures -- List of Tables -- List of Abbreviations -- Preface -- Summary -- Acknowledgments -- About the Authors -- Section A: General Details of Additive Manufacturing Processes -- 1. Introduction -- 1.1 Introduction -- 1.2 Types of AM Technologies -- 1.3 Nomenclature of AM Machines -- 1.4 Prototyping, Tooling and Manufacturing -- 1.4.1 Direct AM Processes -- 1.4.1.1 Direct Prototyping -- 1.4.1.2 Direct Tooling -- 1.4.1.2.1 Prototype Tooling -- 1.4.1.3 Direct Manufacturing -- 1.4.2 Indirect AM Processes -- 1.4.2.1 Indirect Prototyping -- 1.4.2.2 Indirect Tooling -- 1.4.2.3 Indirect Manufacturing -- 1.5 Advantages of AM Processes -- 1.6 Challenges of AM Processes -- 1.7 Summary -- References -- 2. Comparison of Additive Manufacturing with Conventional Manufacturing Processes -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.2 Comparison between AM and Conventional Manufacturing -- 2.2.1 Comparison between AM and CNC Machining -- 2.2.2 Comparison between AM and Deformation Processes -- 2.2.3 Comparison between AM and Primary or Shaping Processes -- 2.3 Pros and Cons of AM with Respect to Conventional Manufacturing -- 2.3.1 Part Flexibility -- 2.3.2 Waste Prevention -- 2.3.3 Production Flexibility -- 2.3.4 Process Running Cost -- 2.3.5 Probability of Change -- 2.3.6 Start-up Investment -- 2.3.7 Mass Production -- 2.3.8 Raw Material -- 2.4 Summary -- References -- 3. Additive Manufacturing Processes -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 Classification of AM Processes -- 3.3 Common AM Processes -- 3.4 Summary -- References -- 4. Evolution of Additive Manufacturing Technologies -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 Evolution of AM Technologies -- 4.3 Timeline of AM Technology -- 4.4 Summary -- References -- 5. Generalized Additive Manufacturing Process Chain -- 5.1 Introduction
11.3 Laminated Object Manufacturing -- 11.3.1 Process Description -- 11.3.2 Materials for LOM -- 11.3.3 Process Variants of LOM -- 11.3.4 Advantages of LOM -- 11.3.5 Drawbacks of LOM -- 11.3.6 Design and Quality Aspects -- 11.3.7 Applications of LOM -- 11.4 Ultrasonic Consolidation -- 11.4.1 Benefits of UAM -- 11.4.2 Drawbacks of UAM -- 11.4.3 Applications of UAM -- 11.5 Summary -- 12. Additive Manufacturing Processes Utilizing Directed Energy Deposition Processes -- 12.1 Introduction -- 12.2 Variants of Directed Energy Deposition -- 12.3 Process Description -- 12.4 Classification of DED Techniques -- 12.4.1 Laser-Based DED Techniques -- 12.4.1.1 Direct Laser Deposition -- 12.4.1.1.1 Process Parameters of DLD -- 12.4.1.1.2 Laser-Based DED Techniques for 2D Geometries -- 12.4.1.1.3 Laser-Based DED Techniques for 3D Geometries -- 12.4.1.1.4 Applications of Laser Based DED (LB-DED) -- 12.4.2 Electron Beam-Based DED Processes -- 12.5 Advantages of DED -- 12.6 Drawbacks of DED -- 12.7 Summary -- References -- Section C: Material, Design and Related Aspects of Additive Manufacturing Processes -- 13. Materials for Additive Manufacturing -- 13.1 Introduction -- 13.2 Materials for AM -- 13.2.1 Forms/State of Materials for AM Processes -- 13.2.2 Polymers -- 13.2.3 Metals -- 13.2.4 Ceramic Materials -- 13.2.5 Composite Materials -- 13.3 Material Binding Mechanisms in AM -- 13.3.1 Binding Using Secondary Phase Assistance -- 13.3.2 Binding Using Chemical Induction -- 13.3.3 Binding Using Solid State Sintering -- 13.3.4 Binding Using Liquid Fusion -- 13.4 Defects in AM Parts -- 13.4.1 Balling Phenomena -- 13.4.2 Porosity Defects -- 13.4.3 Cracks -- 13.4.4 Distortion -- 13.4.5 Inferior Surface Finish -- 13.5 Summary -- References -- 14. Additive Manufacturing Design and Strategies -- 14.1 Introduction -- 14.2 Design for AM -- 14.3 AM Design Tools
14.4 Design Considerations -- 14.5 DFAM Design Strategies -- 14.6 DFAM System Details -- 14.7 Summary -- References -- Section D: Trends, Advancements,Applications and Conclusion -- 15. Hybrid Additive Manufacturing -- 15.1 Introduction -- 15.2 Hybrid AM -- 15.2.1 Ultrasonic AM -- 15.2.1.1 Working Principles of UAM -- 15.2.1.2 Applications of UAM -- 15.2.1.2.1 Embedding of Electronic Structures into Metal Matrices -- 15.2.1.2.2 Fabrication of Reinforced MetalMatrix Composites and Metallic Laminates -- 15.2.2 AM Using Cold Spraying -- 15.2.2.1 Working Principles of CSAM -- 15.2.2.2 Advantages and Disadvantages of CSAM -- 15.2.2.3 Applications of CSAM -- 15.2.2.4 Challenges of CSAM -- 15.2.3 Friction-Based AM -- 15.2.3.1 Friction Stir AM -- 15.2.3.2 Additive Friction Stir -- 15.2.3.3 Applications of FBAM -- 15.2.4 Comparison between UAM, FSAM and AFS -- 15.3 Summary -- 16. Additive Manufacturing Applications -- 16.1 Introduction -- 16.2 Application of AM Parts as Visualization Tools -- 16.3 AM Applications in Aerospace -- 16.3.1 Repair Work of Aerospace Components Using AM -- 16.4 Automotive Applications of AM -- 16.5 Medical Applications -- 16.5.1 Applications of AM in Biomaterials -- 16.6 Construction Industry -- 16.7 Retail Applications -- 16.8 Summary -- 17. Impact and Forecasting of Additive Manufacturing -- 17.1 Introduction -- 17.2 Impact of AM -- 17.2.1 Impact on Health and Well-Being -- 17.2.2 Impact on Environment -- 17.2.3 AM Impact upon Supply Chain Management -- 17.2.4 Health and Occupational Hazards -- 17.2.5 Impact on Repair -- 17.3 Economic Characteristics of AM -- 17.4 Sustainability of AM -- 17.5 Summary and Future of AM -- 18. Conclusion -- 18.1 Conclusive Summary -- 18.2 Future Trends -- Index
5.2 AM as Fundamental Time Compression Engineering (TCE) Element -- 5.3 AM Data and Information Flow -- 5.4 Generalized AM Process Chain and Eight Steps in AM -- 5.5 Variation from One AM Machine to Another -- 5.6 Maintenance of Equipment -- 5.7 Material Handling Issues -- 5.8 Summary -- References -- Section B: Process Specific Details of Various Additive Manufacturing Processes -- 6. Additive Manufacturing Processes Utilizing Vat Photopolymerization -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 Materials -- 6.2.1 Precursors -- 6.2.2 Photoinitiators -- 6.2.3 Absorbers -- 6.2.4 Filled Resins -- 6.2.5 Additives -- 6.2.6 Post-Processing -- 6.3 Photopolymerization Process -- 6.4 Process Modelling -- 6.5 Variants and Classification of Vat Photopolymerization Process -- 6.5.1 Free and Constrained Surface Approaches -- 6.5.2 Laser-SLA -- 6.5.2.1 Two Photon Photopolymerization (TPP) -- 6.5.2.2 Pinpoint Solidification -- 6.5.2.3 Bulk Lithography -- 6.5.3 Digital Light Processing SLA Process (DLP-SLA) -- 6.5.3.1 Continuous Liquid Interface Production -- 6.5.4 Liquid Crystal Display Stereolithography -- 6.6 Advantages and Limitations of Vat Photopolymerization Processes -- 6.7 Summary -- References -- 7. Additive Manufacturing Processes Utilizing Powder Bed Fusion Technique -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 Materials -- 7.3 Powder Fusion Mechanism -- 7.4 Process Parameters and Modelling -- 7.4.1 Processing Temperatures (TProcessing) -- 7.4.2 Total Free Energy (Es) -- 7.4.3 Surface Area Bed/Volume Ratio of Particle (SAbed/VRparticle) -- 7.4.4 Particle Dimensions -- 7.4.5 Raw Material Thermal Properties -- 7.5 Powder Handling -- 7.6 Powder Fusion Techniques -- 7.6.1 Solid State Sintering -- 7.6.2 Chemical Sintering -- 7.6.3 Complete Melting -- 7.6.4 Liquid Phase Sintering/Partial Melting -- 7.6.5 Indirect Processing -- 7.6.6 Pattern Method -- 7.6.7 Direct Sintering
7.7 Powder Bed Fusion Process Variants -- 7.7.1 Low Temperature Laser-Based Processing -- 7.7.2 Metal and Ceramic Laser-Based Processing -- 7.7.3 Electron Beam Melting -- 7.7.4 Line- and Layer-Wise Systems -- 7.8 Strengths and Weaknesses of PBF-based AM techniques -- 7.9 Summary -- References -- 8. Additive Manufacturing Processes Utilizing an Extrusion-Based System -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 Basic Principles of Extrusion-Based Processes -- 8.3 Fused Deposition Modelling -- 8.3.1 FDM Materials -- 8.3.2 Working Principles of FDM -- 8.3.3 FDM Process Parameters -- 8.3.4 Performance Measures -- 8.3.5 FDM Modellers -- 8.3.6 FDM Limitations -- 8.4 Bio-Extrusion -- 8.5 Contour Crafting -- 8.6 Non-Planar Systems -- 8.7 RepRap FDM Systems -- 8.8 Fab@home FDM Systems -- 8.9 Applications -- 8.10 Summary -- References -- 9. Additive Manufacturing Processes Utilizing Material Jetting -- 9.1 Introduction -- 9.2 Variants of Material Jetting -- 9.3 Multi-Jet Printing -- 9.4 Droplet Formation Techniques -- 9.4.1 Continuous Stream Inkjet Technology -- 9.4.2 Drop-on- Demand Inkjet Technology -- 9.5 Materials for Material Jetting -- 9.6 Advantages, Drawbacks and Applications of Material Jetting -- 9.6.1 Advantages of MJ -- 9.6.2 Drawbacks of MJ -- 9.6.3 Applications of MJ -- 9.7 Design and Quality Aspects -- 9.8 Summary -- References -- 10. Additive Manufacturing Processes Utilizing Binder Jetting -- 10.1 Introduction -- 10.2 Process Description -- 10.3 Raw Materials -- 10.4 Design and Quality Aspects of BJ -- 10.4.1 Process Related Parameters -- 10.4.2 Material Related Parameters -- 10.5 Advantages of Binder Jetting -- 10.6 Drawbacks of Binder Jetting -- 10.7 Applications of Binder Jetting -- 10.8 Summary -- References -- 11. Additive Manufacturing Processes Utilizing Sheet Lamination Processes -- 11.1 Introduction -- 11.2 Variants of Sheet Lamination
Notes Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources
Subject Manufacturing processes
Three-dimensional printing
Manufacturing processes.
Three-dimensional printing.
Form Electronic book
Author Kundra, T. K
Maheshwari, Sachin
Rathee, Sandeep
ISBN 1351049364
1351049372
9781351049368
9781351049375