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Author Smith, Joel Alexander, author

Title Experiencing phenomenology : an introduction / by Joel Smith
Published London : Routledge, 2016
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Description 1 online resource
Contents Cover; Half Title; Title Page; Copyright Page; Dedication; Table of Contents; List of figures; Preface; 1. The science of experience; 1 Introducing phenomenology; 1.1 What phenomenology is not; 1.2 How phenomenological questions arise; 1.3 The Phenomenological tradition; 2 The science of experience; 2.1 The phenomenological reduction; 2.2 The phenomenological reduction on trial; 2.3 The eidetic reduction; 2.4 The eidetic reduction on trial; 3 Back to the things themselves!; 3.1 Husserlian phenomenology; 3.2 Heideggerian phenomenology; 4 Conclusion; 2. The objects of experience
1 Intentionality in the Phenomenological tradition2 The mark of the mental; 3 The structure of intentionality; 3.1 Intentional objects; 3.2 Quality and matter; 3.3 Noesis and noema; 3.4 Sensation; 4 Being-in-the-world; 5 Conclusion; 3. Experiencing things; 1 The case for sense-data; 1.1 Perspectival variation; 1.2 Illusion; 1.3 Hallucination; 2 Perceptual experience as intentional; 3 Bodily presence; 3.1 Bodily presence and empty intending; 3.2 Intuitive fulfilment and co-presence; 3.3 Bodily presence and sensation; 3.4 Bodily presence and non-conceptual content; 4 Conclusion
1.2 Succession and unity1.3 The specious present; 2 Husserl on time-consciousness; 2.1 Primal impression, retention, protention; 2.2 The temporal horizon; 2.3 Retention and memory; 3 Is Husserl's account tenable?; 3.1 Simultaneity; 3.2 Repetition; 3.3 Non-existence; 3.4 Concurrence; 3.5 Immediacy; 4 Conclusion; 6. Experiencing possibilities; 1 Sensory imagination; 1.1 'Mental images'; 1.2 Sensory and suppositional imagination; 1.3 Sensory imagination and possibility; 2 Sensory imagination as reproduced perception; 2.1 Humean impressions and ideas
2.2 Imaginary objects: 'the illusion of immanence'2.3 Imaginary experience: quasi-observation, positing, and spontaneity; 3 Sensory imagination as seeing-in; 3.1 Experiencing pictures; 3.2 Experiencing the imaginary; 3.3 Is there a mental analogon?; 3.4 Is there a need for a mental analogon?; 4 Conclusion; 7. Experiencing oneself; 1 Self-awareness; 1.1 Hume vs. Kant; 1.2 Husserl vs. Husserl; 2 Sartre against the transcendental ego; 2.1 The unity of experience; 2.2 The individuality of experience; 2.3 Selfless experience; 2.4 Transparency and the death of consciousness
4. Experiencing properties1 Perceptual constancy; 1.1 The experience of shape, size, and colour; 1.2 Scepticism about perceptual constancy; 1.3 Constancy and memory; 2 Husserl on perceptual constancy; 2.1 Constancy and adumbration; 2.2 Intuitive fulfilment, co-presence, inner horizon, and anticipation; 2.3 Husserl and 'intellectualism'; 3 Merleau-Ponty on perceptual constancy; 3.1 The experiential context; 3.2 The constancy of shape and size; 3.3 The constancy of colour; 4 Conclusion; 5. Experiencing events; 1 Events in experience; 1.1 A puzzle about the experience of events
Bibliography Includes bibliographical references and index
Notes Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page (EBSCO, viewed April 4, 2016)
Subject Phenomenology.
Form Electronic book
ISBN 1317241622 (electronic bk)
9780415718929
9781317241621 (electronic bk)