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Author Amsden, Alice H. (Alice Hoffenberg)

Title The rise of "the rest" : challenges to the west from late-industrializing economies / Alice H. Amsden
Published Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2001

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Location Call no. Vol. Availability
 WATERFT BUSINESS  338.90091724 Ams/Rot  TEMPORARILY UNAVAILABLE
Description vi, 405 pages ; 24 cm
Summary "After a century of struggle, a dozen non-Western countries with Pre-World War II manufacturing experience succeeded in entering the orbit of modern industry. The rise of "the rest" was historically unprecedented. For the first time, countries without the competitive asset of proprietary, pioneering technology became economic powers. How industrialization among these prime latecomers succeeded, why it followed a novel path, and what some countries did to advance farther than others are the questions this book addresses."
"The same seed was contained in all "the rest's" rise, a seed that had first germinated in Japan and then grew as might plants in clay pots of differing sizes and shapes, spanning Latin America (Argentina, Brazil, Chile and Mexico), the Middle East (Turkey), and Asia (India, China, Korea, Taiwan, Malaysia, Indonesia and Thailand). To industrialize by borrowing already-commercialized technology, devoid of the radically new products and processes that had enriched the North Atlantic, "the rest's" rise involved intense learning, an extensive role for the government, and the formation of specific types of business enterprise. Indeed, the rest's unique reciprocal control mechanism differed from Adam Smith's invisible hand and served to reduce government failure and firm mismanagement."
"By the 1990s, two distinct varieties had taken root. All economies of "the rest" had become more globalized, but the "integrationists" (epitomized by Mexico's affiliation to the North Atlantic Free Trade Agreement and Argentina's adoption of a dollar-based currency board) were characterized by heavy reliance on foreign direct investment and minimal local expenditure on skills (as measured by research and development). The "independents," led by China, India, Korea and Taiwan, were notable for their nationally controlled firms and surging investments in technological capabilities."--BOOK JACKET
Bibliography Includes bibliographical references (pages 335-385) and index
Subject Industrialization -- Developing countries -- History.
Competition, International.
LC no. 00039947
ISBN 0195139690
Other Titles The rise of "the rest"
OTHER TI Oxford scholarship online. http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no2006024588