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Book

Title Australia and the United Nations / edited by James Cotton and David Lee
Published Barton, A.C.T. : Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, [2012]
Barton, A.C.T. : Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, 2012
©2012
©2012

Copies

Location Call no. Vol. Availability
 W'PONDS  KC 300 K1 Cot/Aat  DUE 19-02-20
 ADPML SPALF  341.2394 Cot/Aat  LIB USE ONLY
Description xxvi, 558 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations, portraits ; 25 cm
regular print
Contents Ch 1. Australia in the League of Nations: role, debates presence -- Ch 2. Dr HV Evatt and the United Nations: The problem of collective security and liberal internationalism -- Ch 3. Australia ans the security council -- Ch 4. Decolonisation -- Ch 5. Australia, ECOSOC and the UN specialised agencies -- Ch 6. Australia and development cooperation at the United Nations: Towards poverty reduction -- Ch 7. Australia and UN peacekeeping: Steady and unwavering support -- Ch 8. Arms control and disarmament -- Ch 9. Australia's engagement with the UN on environmental issues: benefits and balance -- Ch 10. Human rights and international law -- Ch 11. Australia and UN reform
Summary Australia and the United Nations traces how Australia committed itself to the United Nations project, from before the convening of the first United Nations Security Council until the eve of its election to a fifth term on that body
Analysis Australia overseas comparisons
Australian
Decolonisation
Disarmament
Evatt, H V
History
Human rights
International cooperation
International law
International relations
League of Nations
Natural resource management
Treaties and conventions
UN Security Council
UN agencies
UN peacekeeping operations
United Nations
Notes This landmark reference work is the first complete history of Australia and its relationship with, and role within, the United Nations. On 17 January 1946, when the United Nations Security Council held its inaugural session, an Australian representative, Norman Makin, presided. If all members adhered to the principles of the United Nations Charter, predicted Makin, the United Nations would become "a great power for the good of the world, bringing that freedom from fear, which is necessary before we can hope for progress and welfare in all lands". Australia and the United Nations traces how Australia committed itself to the United Nations project, from before the convening of the first United Nations Security Council until the eve of its election to a fifth term on that body. The book begins with Australian involvement with the organisation that preceded the United Nations, the League of Nations. It then analyses the role played by Australian Minister for External Affairs, HV Evatt, and his staff in framing the United Nations Charter at San Francisco in 1945. Three chapters analyse Australia's diplomacy towards the Security Council, its efforts in peacekeeping, and evolving policies and attitudes towards arms control and disarmament. Two chapters discuss Australia's engagement with the United Nations' manifold specialised agencies and the role of the broader UN family in development. Another two chapters are devoted to a study of Australia's role in areas of United Nations operation only dimly foreseen by its founders at San Francisco-decolonisation and the environment. The two final chapters examine Australia's contribution to the promotion of human rights and international law and the important role it has played seeking to improve the United Nations' performance to equip it to meet new challenges in global politics. Australia and the United Nations tells us what was done in the past, and why
Bibliography Includes bibliographical references (page 494-523) and index
Subject United Nat
United Nations -- Australia.
Australia -- Foreign relations.
Author Cotton, James, 1949- editor
Lee, David, 1965- editor
Australia. Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade.
ISBN 9781743220160 (hbk.)
9781743220177 (paperback)
Other Titles Australia & the United Nations