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Acquauiua, Claudio, 1543-1615 -- See Acquaviva, Claudio, 1543-1615


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Acquaviva, Claudio, 1543-1615. : Early modern Jesuits between obedience and conscience during the generalate of Claudio Acquaviva (1581-1615) / by Silvia Mostaccio  2014 1
Acquiescence (Law) -- Great Britain. : British child migration : consent of parents to their children's emigration : the legal and moral dimension / Barry M. Coldrey  1996 1
Acquiescence (Psychology)   3
Acquiescence (Psychology) -- Religious aspects -- Christianity : Power of agreement / by Al Houghton  1981 1
Acquiescence (Psychology) -- Statistical methods : Analyzing rater agreement : manifest variable methods / Alexander von Eye, Eun Young Mun  2005 1
 

Acquired Agraphia -- See Agraphia


Loss or impairment of the ability to write (letters, syllables, words, or phrases) due to an injury to a specific cerebral area or occasionally due to emotional factors. This condition rarely occurs in isolation, and often accompanies APHASIA. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p485; APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)
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Acquired Agraphias -- See Agraphia


Loss or impairment of the ability to write (letters, syllables, words, or phrases) due to an injury to a specific cerebral area or occasionally due to emotional factors. This condition rarely occurs in isolation, and often accompanies APHASIA. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p485; APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)
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Acquired Alexia -- See Dyslexia, Acquired


A receptive visual aphasia characterized by the loss of a previously possessed ability to comprehend the meaning or significance of handwritten words, despite intact vision. This condition may be associated with posterior cerebral artery infarction (INFARCTION, POSTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY) and other BRAIN DISEASES
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Acquired Aphasia -- See Aphasia


A cognitive disorder marked by an impaired ability to comprehend or express language in its written or spoken form. This condition is caused by diseases which affect the language areas of the dominant hemisphere. Clinical features are used to classify the various subtypes of this condition. General categories include receptive, expressive, and mixed forms of aphasia
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Acquired Blindness -- See Blindness


The inability to see or the loss or absence of perception of visual stimuli. This condition may be the result of EYE DISEASES; OPTIC NERVE DISEASES; OPTIC CHIASM diseases; or BRAIN DISEASES affecting the VISUAL PATHWAYS or OCCIPITAL LOBE
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Acquired characters, Heredity of -- See Inheritance of acquired characters


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Acquired characters, Inheritance of -- See Inheritance of acquired characters


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Acquired Color Blindness -- See Color Vision Defects


Defects of color vision are mainly hereditary traits but can be secondary to acquired or developmental abnormalities in the CONES (RETINA). Severity of hereditary defects of color vision depends on the degree of mutation of the ROD OPSINS genes (on X CHROMOSOME and CHROMOSOME 3) that code the photopigments for red, green and blue
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Acquired Communication Disorder -- See Communication Disorders


Disorders of verbal and nonverbal communication caused by receptive or expressive LANGUAGE DISORDERS, cognitive dysfunction (e.g., MENTAL RETARDATION), psychiatric conditions, and HEARING DISORDERS
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Acquired Communication Disorders -- See Communication Disorders


Disorders of verbal and nonverbal communication caused by receptive or expressive LANGUAGE DISORDERS, cognitive dysfunction (e.g., MENTAL RETARDATION), psychiatric conditions, and HEARING DISORDERS
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Acquired Deafness -- See Deafness


A general term for the complete loss of the ability to hear from both ears
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Acquired deafness, Postlingually -- See Postlingual deafness


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Acquired Dyscalculia -- See Dyscalculia


Impaired ability in numerical concepts. These inabilities arise as a result of primary neurological lesion, are syndromic (e.g., GERSTMANN SYNDROME ) or acquired due to brain damage
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Acquired Dyscalculias -- See Dyscalculia


Impaired ability in numerical concepts. These inabilities arise as a result of primary neurological lesion, are syndromic (e.g., GERSTMANN SYNDROME ) or acquired due to brain damage
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Acquired Dysgraphia -- See Agraphia


Loss or impairment of the ability to write (letters, syllables, words, or phrases) due to an injury to a specific cerebral area or occasionally due to emotional factors. This condition rarely occurs in isolation, and often accompanies APHASIA. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p485; APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)
  1
 

Acquired Dysgraphias -- See Agraphia


Loss or impairment of the ability to write (letters, syllables, words, or phrases) due to an injury to a specific cerebral area or occasionally due to emotional factors. This condition rarely occurs in isolation, and often accompanies APHASIA. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p485; APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)
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  Acquired dyslexia -- 2 Related Subjects   2
 

Acquired Epidermolysis Bullosa -- See Epidermolysis Bullosa Acquisita


Form of epidermolysis bullosa characterized by trauma-induced, subepidermal blistering with no family history of the disease. Direct immunofluorescence shows IMMUNOGLOBULIN G deposited at the dermo-epidermal junction
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Acquired Facial Neuropathies -- See Facial Nerve Diseases


Diseases of the facial nerve or nuclei. Pontine disorders may affect the facial nuclei or nerve fascicle. The nerve may be involved intracranially, along its course through the petrous portion of the temporal bone, or along its extracranial course. Clinical manifestations include facial muscle weakness, loss of taste from the anterior tongue, hyperacusis, and decreased lacrimation
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Acquired Facial Neuropathy -- See Facial Nerve Diseases


Diseases of the facial nerve or nuclei. Pontine disorders may affect the facial nuclei or nerve fascicle. The nerve may be involved intracranially, along its course through the petrous portion of the temporal bone, or along its extracranial course. Clinical manifestations include facial muscle weakness, loss of taste from the anterior tongue, hyperacusis, and decreased lacrimation
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Acquired Foot Deformities -- See Foot Deformities, Acquired


Distortion or disfigurement of the foot, or a part of the foot, acquired through disease or injury after birth
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Acquired Foot Deformity -- See Foot Deformities, Acquired


Distortion or disfigurement of the foot, or a part of the foot, acquired through disease or injury after birth
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Acquired Form of Epidermolysis Bullosa -- See Epidermolysis Bullosa Acquisita


Form of epidermolysis bullosa characterized by trauma-induced, subepidermal blistering with no family history of the disease. Direct immunofluorescence shows IMMUNOGLOBULIN G deposited at the dermo-epidermal junction
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Acquired Global Dyslexia -- See Dyslexia, Acquired


A receptive visual aphasia characterized by the loss of a previously possessed ability to comprehend the meaning or significance of handwritten words, despite intact vision. This condition may be associated with posterior cerebral artery infarction (INFARCTION, POSTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY) and other BRAIN DISEASES
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Acquired Hemolytic Anemia -- See Anemia, Hemolytic


A condition of inadequate circulating red blood cells (ANEMIA) or insufficient HEMOGLOBIN due to premature destruction of red blood cells (ERYTHROCYTES)
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Acquired ifmunodeficiency syndrome : Youth, AIDS, and sexually transmitted diseases / Susan Moore, Doreen Rosenthal, and Anne Mitchell  1996 1
Acquired Immonodeficiency Syndrome -- transmission : From child sexual abuse to adult sexual risk : trauma, revictimization, and intervention / edited by Linda J. Koenig ... [and others]  2004 1
  Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome -- 2 Related Subjects   2
 

Acquired-Immune Deficiency Syndrome Dementia Complex -- See AIDS Dementia Complex


A neurologic condition associated with the ACQUIRED IMMUNODEFICIENCY SYNDROME and characterized by impaired concentration and memory, slowness of hand movements, ATAXIA, incontinence, apathy, and gait difficulties associated with HIV-1 viral infection of the central nervous system. Pathologic examination of the brain reveals white matter rarefaction, perivascular infiltrates of lymphocytes, foamy macrophages, and multinucleated giant cells. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp760-1; N Engl J Med, 1995 Apr 6;332(14):934-40)
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Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome Virus -- See HIV


Human immunodeficiency virus. A non-taxonomic and historical term referring to any of two species, specifically HIV-1 and/or HIV-2. Prior to 1986, this was called human T-lymphotropic virus type III/lymphadenopathy-associated virus (HTLV-III/LAV). From 1986-1990, it was an official species called HIV. Since 1991, HIV was no longer considered an official species name; the two species were designated HIV-1 and HIV-2
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Acquired immuniodeficiency syndrome -- Prevention & control : Health workers and AIDS : research intervention and current issues in burnout and response / edited by Lydia Bennett, David Miller, Michael Ross  1995 1
 

Acquired Immunity -- See Adaptive Immunity


Protection from an infectious disease agent that is mediated by B- and T- LYMPHOCYTES following exposure to specific antigen, and characterized by IMMUNOLOGIC MEMORY. It can result from either previous infection with that agent or vaccination (IMMUNITY, ACTIVE), or transfer of antibody or lymphocytes from an immune donor (IMMUNIZATION, PASSIVE)
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Acquired Immuno-Deficiency Syndrome -- See Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome


An acquired defect of cellular immunity associated with infection by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), a CD4-positive T-lymphocyte count under 200 cells/microliter or less than 14% of total lymphocytes, and increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections and malignant neoplasms. Clinical manifestations also include emaciation (wasting) and dementia. These elements reflect criteria for AIDS as defined by the CDC in 1993
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Acquired Immuno-Deficiency Syndromes -- See Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome


An acquired defect of cellular immunity associated with infection by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), a CD4-positive T-lymphocyte count under 200 cells/microliter or less than 14% of total lymphocytes, and increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections and malignant neoplasms. Clinical manifestations also include emaciation (wasting) and dementia. These elements reflect criteria for AIDS as defined by the CDC in 1993
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Acquired Immunodeficience Syndrome -- prevention & control -- Periodicals : AIDS education and prevention (Online)    1
  Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome -- 5 Related Subjects   5
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome.   235
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome -- Africa -- Periodicals : African journal of AIDS research (Online)  2002- 1
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome -- complications.   9
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome -- diagnosis.   4
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome -- diet therapy. : Nutrients and foods in AIDS / edited by Ronald R. Watson  1998 1
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome -- drug therapy   11
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome -- drug therapy -- Brazil : Pharmaceutical autonomy and public health in Latin America : state, society, and industry in Brazil's AIDS program / Matthew Flynn  2015 1
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome -- economics.   14
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