Limit search to available items
Nearby Subjects are:
Result Page   Prev Next
Add Marked to Bag Add All On Page Add Marked to My Lists
Mark   Year Entries
 

Anesthetics in otolaryngology -- See Anesthesia in otolaryngology


  1
 

Anesthetics in veterinary medicine -- See Veterinary anesthesia


  1
Anesthetics, Local. : Anestetici locali in analgesia ostetrica : il modello MLAC: dalla teoria alla pratica clinica / Michela Camorcia  2007 1
Anesthetics, Local -- administration & dosage.   7
Anesthetics, Local -- adverse effects.   2
Anesthetics, Local -- therapeutic use.   3
Anesthetics -- nurses' instruction -- handbooks : Nurse anesthesia secrets / [edited by] Mary Karlet  2005 1
Anesthetics -- Periodicals.   7
Anesthetics -- pharmacokinetics.   3
Anesthetics -- pharmacology.   14
Anesthetics -- Physiological effect.   12
Anesthetics -- Physiological effect -- Handbooks, manuals, etc. : Handbook of pharmacology & physiology in anesthetic practice / by Robert K. Stoelting, Simon C. Hillier  2006 1
Anesthetics -- Physiological effect -- Periodicals : Medical gas research    1
Anesthetics -- Problems, exercises, etc. : Short answer questions in anaesthesia : how to manage the answers / Geoffrey Rushman  1997 1
Anesthetics -- Psychological aspects. : Suppressing the mind : anesthetic modulation of memory and consciousness / Anthony Hudetz, Robert Pearce, editors  2010 1
Anesthetics -- Psychotropic effects -- Congresses. : Memory and awareness in anaesthesia IV : proceedings of the Fourth International Symposium on Memory and Awareness in Anaesthesia / editors ; C. Jordan, D.J.A. Vaughan, D.E.F. Newton  2000 1
Anesthetics -- Side effects.   5
Anesthetics -- therapeutic use.   7
 

Anesthetics, Topical -- See Anesthetics, Local


Drugs that block nerve conduction when applied locally to nerve tissue in appropriate concentrations. They act on any part of the nervous system and on every type of nerve fiber. In contact with a nerve trunk, these anesthetics can cause both sensory and motor paralysis in the innervated area. Their action is completely reversible. (From Gilman AG, et. al., Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed) Nearly all local anesthetics act by reducing the tendency of voltage-dependent sodium channels to activate
  1
Anesthetics -- Toxicology : Anesthetic toxicity / editors, Susan A. Rice, Kevin J. Fish  2018 1
 

Anesthetist, Nurse -- See Nurse Anesthetists


Professional nurses who have completed postgraduate training in the administration of anesthetics
  1
 

Anesthetist, Physician -- See Anesthesiologists


Physicians specializing in ANESTHESIOLOGY
  1
  Anesthetists -- 2 Related Subjects   2
  Anesthetists, Nurse -- 2 Related Subjects   2
 

Anesthetists, Physician -- See Anesthesiologists


Physicians specializing in ANESTHESIOLOGY
  1
Anetso. : Anetso, the Cherokee ball game : at the center of ceremony and identity / Michael J. Zogry  2010 1
 

Aneugens -- See Also Aneuploidy


The chromosomal constitution of cells which deviate from the normal by the addition or subtraction of CHROMOSOMES, chromosome pairs, or chromosome fragments. In a normally diploid cell (DIPLOIDY) the loss of a chromosome pair is termed nullisomy (symbol: 2N-2), the loss of a single chromosome is MONOSOMY (symbol: 2N-1), the addition of a chromosome pair is tetrasomy (symbol: 2N+2), the addition of a single chromosome is TRISOMY (symbol: 2N+1)
  1
 

Aneuploid -- See Aneuploidy


The chromosomal constitution of cells which deviate from the normal by the addition or subtraction of CHROMOSOMES, chromosome pairs, or chromosome fragments. In a normally diploid cell (DIPLOIDY) the loss of a chromosome pair is termed nullisomy (symbol: 2N-2), the loss of a single chromosome is MONOSOMY (symbol: 2N-1), the addition of a chromosome pair is tetrasomy (symbol: 2N+2), the addition of a single chromosome is TRISOMY (symbol: 2N+1)
  1
 

Aneuploid Cell -- See Aneuploidy


The chromosomal constitution of cells which deviate from the normal by the addition or subtraction of CHROMOSOMES, chromosome pairs, or chromosome fragments. In a normally diploid cell (DIPLOIDY) the loss of a chromosome pair is termed nullisomy (symbol: 2N-2), the loss of a single chromosome is MONOSOMY (symbol: 2N-1), the addition of a chromosome pair is tetrasomy (symbol: 2N+2), the addition of a single chromosome is TRISOMY (symbol: 2N+1)
  1
 

Aneuploid Cells -- See Aneuploidy


The chromosomal constitution of cells which deviate from the normal by the addition or subtraction of CHROMOSOMES, chromosome pairs, or chromosome fragments. In a normally diploid cell (DIPLOIDY) the loss of a chromosome pair is termed nullisomy (symbol: 2N-2), the loss of a single chromosome is MONOSOMY (symbol: 2N-1), the addition of a chromosome pair is tetrasomy (symbol: 2N+2), the addition of a single chromosome is TRISOMY (symbol: 2N+1)
  1
 

Aneuploidies -- See Aneuploidy


The chromosomal constitution of cells which deviate from the normal by the addition or subtraction of CHROMOSOMES, chromosome pairs, or chromosome fragments. In a normally diploid cell (DIPLOIDY) the loss of a chromosome pair is termed nullisomy (symbol: 2N-2), the loss of a single chromosome is MONOSOMY (symbol: 2N-1), the addition of a chromosome pair is tetrasomy (symbol: 2N+2), the addition of a single chromosome is TRISOMY (symbol: 2N+1)
  1
 

Aneuploids -- See Aneuploidy


The chromosomal constitution of cells which deviate from the normal by the addition or subtraction of CHROMOSOMES, chromosome pairs, or chromosome fragments. In a normally diploid cell (DIPLOIDY) the loss of a chromosome pair is termed nullisomy (symbol: 2N-2), the loss of a single chromosome is MONOSOMY (symbol: 2N-1), the addition of a chromosome pair is tetrasomy (symbol: 2N+2), the addition of a single chromosome is TRISOMY (symbol: 2N+1)
  1
Aneuploidy.   4
 

Aneurin (Vitamin) -- See Vitamin B1


  1
 

Aneurine -- See Vitamin B1


  1
 

Aneurisms -- See Aneurysms


  1
 

Aneurysm, Anterior Cerebral Artery -- See Intracranial Aneurysm


Abnormal outpouching in the wall of intracranial blood vessels. Most common are the saccular (berry) aneurysms located at branch points in CIRCLE OF WILLIS at the base of the brain. Vessel rupture results in SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Giant aneurysms (>2.5 cm in diameter) may compress adjacent structures, including the OCULOMOTOR NERVE. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p841)
  1
 

Aneurysm, Anterior Communicating Artery -- See Intracranial Aneurysm


Abnormal outpouching in the wall of intracranial blood vessels. Most common are the saccular (berry) aneurysms located at branch points in CIRCLE OF WILLIS at the base of the brain. Vessel rupture results in SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Giant aneurysms (>2.5 cm in diameter) may compress adjacent structures, including the OCULOMOTOR NERVE. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p841)
  1
 

Aneurysm, Aortic -- See Aortic Aneurysm


An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of AORTA
  1
 

Aneurysm, Basilar Artery -- See Intracranial Aneurysm


Abnormal outpouching in the wall of intracranial blood vessels. Most common are the saccular (berry) aneurysms located at branch points in CIRCLE OF WILLIS at the base of the brain. Vessel rupture results in SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Giant aneurysms (>2.5 cm in diameter) may compress adjacent structures, including the OCULOMOTOR NERVE. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p841)
  1
 

Aneurysm, Berry -- See Intracranial Aneurysm


Abnormal outpouching in the wall of intracranial blood vessels. Most common are the saccular (berry) aneurysms located at branch points in CIRCLE OF WILLIS at the base of the brain. Vessel rupture results in SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Giant aneurysms (>2.5 cm in diameter) may compress adjacent structures, including the OCULOMOTOR NERVE. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p841)
  1
 

Aneurysm, Brain -- See Intracranial Aneurysm


Abnormal outpouching in the wall of intracranial blood vessels. Most common are the saccular (berry) aneurysms located at branch points in CIRCLE OF WILLIS at the base of the brain. Vessel rupture results in SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Giant aneurysms (>2.5 cm in diameter) may compress adjacent structures, including the OCULOMOTOR NERVE. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p841)
  1
 

Aneurysm, Cardiac -- See Heart Aneurysm


A localized bulging or dilatation in the muscle wall of a heart (MYOCARDIUM), usually in the LEFT VENTRICLE. Blood-filled aneurysms are dangerous because they may burst. Fibrous aneurysms interfere with the heart function through the loss of contractility. True aneurysm is bound by the vessel wall or cardiac wall. False aneurysms are HEMATOMA caused by myocardial rupture
  1
 

Aneurysm, Cerebral -- See Intracranial Aneurysm


Abnormal outpouching in the wall of intracranial blood vessels. Most common are the saccular (berry) aneurysms located at branch points in CIRCLE OF WILLIS at the base of the brain. Vessel rupture results in SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Giant aneurysms (>2.5 cm in diameter) may compress adjacent structures, including the OCULOMOTOR NERVE. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p841)
  1
Aneurysm, Dissecting.   3
Aneurysm -- etiology   2
 

Aneurysm, Giant Intracranial -- See Intracranial Aneurysm


Abnormal outpouching in the wall of intracranial blood vessels. Most common are the saccular (berry) aneurysms located at branch points in CIRCLE OF WILLIS at the base of the brain. Vessel rupture results in SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Giant aneurysms (>2.5 cm in diameter) may compress adjacent structures, including the OCULOMOTOR NERVE. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p841)
  1
 

Aneurysm, Heart -- See Heart Aneurysm


A localized bulging or dilatation in the muscle wall of a heart (MYOCARDIUM), usually in the LEFT VENTRICLE. Blood-filled aneurysms are dangerous because they may burst. Fibrous aneurysms interfere with the heart function through the loss of contractility. True aneurysm is bound by the vessel wall or cardiac wall. False aneurysms are HEMATOMA caused by myocardial rupture
  1
 

Aneurysm, Intracranial -- See Intracranial Aneurysm


Abnormal outpouching in the wall of intracranial blood vessels. Most common are the saccular (berry) aneurysms located at branch points in CIRCLE OF WILLIS at the base of the brain. Vessel rupture results in SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Giant aneurysms (>2.5 cm in diameter) may compress adjacent structures, including the OCULOMOTOR NERVE. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p841)
  1
 

Aneurysm, Intracranial Mycotic -- See Intracranial Aneurysm


Abnormal outpouching in the wall of intracranial blood vessels. Most common are the saccular (berry) aneurysms located at branch points in CIRCLE OF WILLIS at the base of the brain. Vessel rupture results in SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Giant aneurysms (>2.5 cm in diameter) may compress adjacent structures, including the OCULOMOTOR NERVE. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p841)
  1
Add Marked to Bag Add All On Page Add Marked to My Lists
Result Page   Prev Next