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Bioprostheses -- See Bioprosthesis


Prosthesis, usually heart valve, composed of biological material and whose durability depends upon the stability of the material after pretreatment, rather than regeneration by host cell ingrowth. Durability is achieved 1, mechanically by the interposition of a cloth, usually polytetrafluoroethylene, between the host and the graft, and 2, chemically by stabilization of the tissue by intermolecular linking, usually with glutaraldehyde, after removal of antigenic components, or the use of reconstituted and restructured biopolymers
  1
 

Bioprostheses, Heterograft -- See Bioprosthesis


Prosthesis, usually heart valve, composed of biological material and whose durability depends upon the stability of the material after pretreatment, rather than regeneration by host cell ingrowth. Durability is achieved 1, mechanically by the interposition of a cloth, usually polytetrafluoroethylene, between the host and the graft, and 2, chemically by stabilization of the tissue by intermolecular linking, usually with glutaraldehyde, after removal of antigenic components, or the use of reconstituted and restructured biopolymers
  1
 

Bioprostheses, Porcine Xenograft -- See Bioprosthesis


Prosthesis, usually heart valve, composed of biological material and whose durability depends upon the stability of the material after pretreatment, rather than regeneration by host cell ingrowth. Durability is achieved 1, mechanically by the interposition of a cloth, usually polytetrafluoroethylene, between the host and the graft, and 2, chemically by stabilization of the tissue by intermolecular linking, usually with glutaraldehyde, after removal of antigenic components, or the use of reconstituted and restructured biopolymers
  1
 

Bioprostheses, Xenograft -- See Bioprosthesis


Prosthesis, usually heart valve, composed of biological material and whose durability depends upon the stability of the material after pretreatment, rather than regeneration by host cell ingrowth. Durability is achieved 1, mechanically by the interposition of a cloth, usually polytetrafluoroethylene, between the host and the graft, and 2, chemically by stabilization of the tissue by intermolecular linking, usually with glutaraldehyde, after removal of antigenic components, or the use of reconstituted and restructured biopolymers
  1
 

Bioprosthesis -- See Also Transplants


Organs, tissues, or cells taken from the body for grafting into another area of the same body or into another individual
  1
Bioprosthesis.   2
 

Bioprosthesis, Heterograft -- See Bioprosthesis


Prosthesis, usually heart valve, composed of biological material and whose durability depends upon the stability of the material after pretreatment, rather than regeneration by host cell ingrowth. Durability is achieved 1, mechanically by the interposition of a cloth, usually polytetrafluoroethylene, between the host and the graft, and 2, chemically by stabilization of the tissue by intermolecular linking, usually with glutaraldehyde, after removal of antigenic components, or the use of reconstituted and restructured biopolymers
  1
 

Bioprosthesis, Porcine Xenograft -- See Bioprosthesis


Prosthesis, usually heart valve, composed of biological material and whose durability depends upon the stability of the material after pretreatment, rather than regeneration by host cell ingrowth. Durability is achieved 1, mechanically by the interposition of a cloth, usually polytetrafluoroethylene, between the host and the graft, and 2, chemically by stabilization of the tissue by intermolecular linking, usually with glutaraldehyde, after removal of antigenic components, or the use of reconstituted and restructured biopolymers
  1
 

Bioprosthesis, Xenograft -- See Bioprosthesis


Prosthesis, usually heart valve, composed of biological material and whose durability depends upon the stability of the material after pretreatment, rather than regeneration by host cell ingrowth. Durability is achieved 1, mechanically by the interposition of a cloth, usually polytetrafluoroethylene, between the host and the graft, and 2, chemically by stabilization of the tissue by intermolecular linking, usually with glutaraldehyde, after removal of antigenic components, or the use of reconstituted and restructured biopolymers
  1
 

Biopsies -- See Biopsy


Removal and pathologic examination of specimens from the living body
  1
 

Biopsies, Aspiration -- See Biopsy, Needle


Removal and examination of tissue obtained through a transdermal needle inserted into the specific region, organ, or tissue being analyzed
  1
 

Biopsies, Core Needle -- See Biopsy, Large-Core Needle


The use of needles usually larger than 14-gauge to remove tissue samples large enough to retain cellular architecture for pathology examination
  1
 

Biopsies, Fine Needle -- See Biopsy, Fine-Needle


Using fine needles (finer than 22-gauge) to remove tissue or fluid specimens from the living body for examination in the pathology laboratory and for disease diagnosis
  1
 

Biopsies, Fine-Needle Aspiration -- See Biopsy, Fine-Needle


Using fine needles (finer than 22-gauge) to remove tissue or fluid specimens from the living body for examination in the pathology laboratory and for disease diagnosis
  1
 

Biopsies, Image-Guided -- See Image-Guided Biopsy


Conducting a biopsy procedure with the aid of a MEDICAL IMAGING modality
  1
 

Biopsies, Imaging Guided -- See Image-Guided Biopsy


Conducting a biopsy procedure with the aid of a MEDICAL IMAGING modality
  1
 

Biopsies, Large-Core Needle -- See Biopsy, Large-Core Needle


The use of needles usually larger than 14-gauge to remove tissue samples large enough to retain cellular architecture for pathology examination
  1
 

Biopsies, Needle -- See Biopsy, Needle


Removal and examination of tissue obtained through a transdermal needle inserted into the specific region, organ, or tissue being analyzed
  1
 

Biopsies, Puncture -- See Biopsy, Needle


Removal and examination of tissue obtained through a transdermal needle inserted into the specific region, organ, or tissue being analyzed
  1
 

Biopsy -- See Also the narrower term Needle biopsy



--subdivision Needle biopsy under individual organs and regions of the body, e.g. Heart--Needle biopsy
  1
Biopsy.   17
Adrenal glands -- Biopsy. : Biopsy interpretation of the kidney and adrenal gland / Satish K. Tickoo, Yingbei Chen, Debra Zynger  2015 1
Biopsy -- adverse effects   2
 

Biopsy, Aspiration -- See Biopsy, Needle


Removal and examination of tissue obtained through a transdermal needle inserted into the specific region, organ, or tissue being analyzed
  1
Breast -- Biopsy.   3
Breast -- Biopsy -- Atlases. : Duktoskopie : Lehratlas zur endoskopischen Milchgangsspiegelung / Ralf Ohlinger, Susanne Grunwald ; unter besonderer Mitarbeit von Markus Hahn und Stefan Paepke ; mit einem Geleitwort von Diethelm Wallwiener  2009 1
Colon (Anatomy) -- Biopsy. : Colitis : a practical approach to colon biopsy interpretation / Karel Geboes, Sonia Nemolato, Maria Leo, Gavino Faa  2014 1
 

Biopsy, Core Needle -- See Biopsy, Large-Core Needle


The use of needles usually larger than 14-gauge to remove tissue samples large enough to retain cellular architecture for pathology examination
  1
Endometrium -- Biopsy. : Diagnosis of endometrial biopsies and curettings : a practical approach / Michael T. Mazur, Robert J. Kurman  2005 1
Biopsy, Fine-Needle.   9
 

Biopsy, Fine-Needle Aspiration -- See Biopsy, Fine-Needle


Using fine needles (finer than 22-gauge) to remove tissue or fluid specimens from the living body for examination in the pathology laboratory and for disease diagnosis
  1
Biopsy, Fine-Needle -- methods.   10
Gastrointestinal system -- Biopsy. : Gastrointestinal endoscopy in the cancer patient / edited by John Deutsch, Matthew R. Banks  2013 1
 

Biopsy, Image-Guided -- See Image-Guided Biopsy


Conducting a biopsy procedure with the aid of a MEDICAL IMAGING modality
  1
 

Biopsy, Imaging Guided -- See Image-Guided Biopsy


Conducting a biopsy procedure with the aid of a MEDICAL IMAGING modality
  1
Kidneys -- Biopsy.   2
Biopsy, Large-Core Needle. : A comprehensive guide to core needle biopsies of the breast / Sandra J. Shin, editor  2016 1
Liver -- Biopsy.   3
Lungs -- Biopsy.   2
Lymph nodes -- Biopsy.   4
Mediastinum -- Tumors -- Biopsy. : Mediastinal lesions : diagnostic pearls for interpretation of small biopsies and cytology / Anja C. Roden, Andre L. Moreira, editors  2017 1
Biopsy -- methods.   8
Muscles -- Biopsy. : Muscle biopsy : a practical approach / Victor Dubowitz, Caroline A. Sewry, Anders Oldfors ; with contribution on toxic and drug-induced myopathies by Russell Lane  2013 1
 

Biopsy, Needle -- See Needle biopsy



--subdivision Needle biopsy under individual organs and regions of the body, e.g. Heart--Needle biopsy
  1
Biopsy, Needle.   4
Biopsy, Needle -- methods.   7
Nerves -- Biopsy -- Atlases. : Color atlas of nerve biopsy pathology / Shin J. Oh  2002 1
Nerves, Peripheral -- Biopsy. : Biopsy diagnosis of peripheral neuropathy / by Juan M Bilbao, Robert E Schmidt  2015 1
Prostate -- Biopsy.   2
 

Biopsy, Puncture -- See Biopsy, Needle


Removal and examination of tissue obtained through a transdermal needle inserted into the specific region, organ, or tissue being analyzed
  1
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