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Title Origin of mitochondria and hydrogenosomes / William F. Martin, Miklós Müller, editors
Published Berlin ; New York : Springer, [2007]
©2007
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Description 1 online resource (xviii, 306 pages) : illustrations (some color)
Contents The road to hydrogenosomes / Miklos Muller -- Mitochondria: key to complexity / Nick Lane -- Origin, function, and transmission of mitochondria / Carol A. Allen, Mark Van Der Giezen, John F. Allen -- Mitochondria and their host: morphology to molecular phylogeny / Jan Sapp -- Anaerobic mitochondria: properties and origins / Aloysius G.M. Tielens, Jaap J. Van Hellemond -- Iron-sulfur proteins and iron-sulfur cluster assembly in organisms with hydrogenosomes and mitosomes / Jan Tachezy, Pavel Dolezal -- Hydrogenosomes (and related organelles, either) are not the same / Jahannes H.P. Hackstein, Joachim Tjaden, Werner Koopman -- The chimaeric origin of mitochondria: photosynthetic cell enslavement, gene-transfer pressure, and compartmentation efficiency / Thomas Cavalier-Smith -- Constatin merezhkowsky and the endokaryotic hypothesis / Victor V. Emelyanov -- The diversity of mitochondrion-related organelles amongst eukaryotic microbes / Maria Jose Barbera, Inaki Ruiz-Trillo, Jessica Leigh, Laura A. Hug, Andrew J. Roger -- Mitosomes of parasitic protozoa: biology and evolutionary significance / Jorge Tovar
Summary The evolutionary origins of hydrogenosomes have been the subject of considerable debate. From early days it was apparent that hydrogenosomes had evolved on multiple occasions in different eukaryotes, but from which progenitor organelle or endosymbiont was unresolved. Work from many different laboratories has contributed towards formulating the current hypothesis that hydrogenosomes and mitosomes, their even more reduced cousins, share common ancestry with mitochondria. Their shared similarities, for example their common mechanisms of protein import and their double membrane, can be explained by common ancestry, and their differences by descent with modification under contrasting lifestyles. The hypothesis that mitochondria, mitosomes and hydrogenosomes are homologues, predicts that, as the organelles are studied more deeply, additional shared features will be revealed. However, it is already apparent from the contributions to this volume, that identifying the genetic contribution to eukaryotes of the mitochondrial endosymbiosis, and revealing the functions of its descendent organelles, are key to understanding eukaryotic biology and evolution
Bibliography Includes bibliographical references and index
Notes Print version record
In Springer e-books
Subject Eukaryotic cells -- Evolution.
Eukaryotic cells.
Mitochondria.
Mitochondria.
Anaerobiosis.
Biological Evolution.
Eukaryotic Cells -- ultrastructure.
Organelles.
Form Electronic book
Author Martin, William F., Professor Dr.
Müller, Miklós.
LC no. 2006933053
ISBN 3540385010 (Cloth)
3540385029
9783540385011 (Cloth)
9783540385028