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Gene Expression Regulation -- physiology.   9
Gene Expression Regulation, Plant.   9
Gene Expression Regulation, Plant -- Periodicals : Plant biology (Stuttgart, Germany : Online)  1999- 1
Gene Expression Regulation, Plant -- physiology. : Plant biotechnology and transgenic plants / edited by Kirsi-Marja Oksman-Caldentey, Wolfgang H. Barz  2002 1
Gene Expression Regulation, Viral.   4
Gene Expression Regulation, Viral -- genetics. : Vector targeting for therapeutic gene delivery / edited by David T. Curiel, Joanne T. Douglas    1
Gene Expression Regulation, Viral -- physiology. : Viral gene expression regulation / Eli B. Galos, editor  2010 1
Gene expression -- Research.   2
Gene expression -- Research -- Methodology.   6
Gene expression -- Research -- Technique. : Methods in nucleic acids research / editors, Jim D. Karam, Lee Chao, Gregory W. Warr  1990 1
 

Gene Expression Signature -- See Transcriptome


The pattern of GENE EXPRESSION at the level of genetic transcription in a specific organism or under specific circumstances in specific cells
  1
 

Gene Expression Signatures -- See Transcriptome


The pattern of GENE EXPRESSION at the level of genetic transcription in a specific organism or under specific circumstances in specific cells
  1
Gene expression -- Statistical methods.   2
Gene expression -- Technique.   5
Gene expression -- Textbooks. : Gene expression / Gurbachan S. Miglani  2014 1
 

Gene Expressions -- See Gene Expression


The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION
  1
Gene flow.   3
 

Gene Frequencies -- See Gene Frequency


The proportion of one particular in the total of all ALLELES for one genetic locus in a breeding POPULATION
  1
Gene frequency.   6
Gene frequency -- Statistical methods. : Genetic data analysis : methods for discrete population genetic data / Bruce S. Weir  1990 1
 

Gene, Fungal -- See Genes, Fungal


The functional hereditary units of FUNGI
  1
 

Gene, Fungal Mating-Type -- See Genes, Mating Type, Fungal


Fungal genes that mostly encode TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS. In some FUNGI they also encode PHEROMONES and PHEROMONE RECEPTORS. The transcription factors control expression of specific proteins that give a cell its mating identity. Opposite mating type identities are required for mating
  1
Gene fusion. : Applications of chimeric genes and hybrid proteins / edited by Jeremy Thorner, Scott D. Emr, John N. Abelson  2000 1
 

Gene Fusions -- See Gene Fusion


The GENETIC RECOMBINATION of the parts of two or more GENES resulting in a gene with different or additional regulatory regions, or a new chimeric gene product. ONCOGENE FUSION includes an ONCOGENE as at least one of the fusion partners and such gene fusions are often detected in neoplastic cells and are transcribed into ONCOGENE FUSION PROTEINS. ARTIFICIAL GENE FUSION is carried out in vitro by RECOMBINANT DNA technology
  1
 

Gene-Gene Interaction, Epistatic -- See Epistasis, Genetic


A form of gene interaction whereby the expression of one gene interferes with or masks the expression of a different gene or genes. Genes whose expression interferes with or masks the effects of other genes are said to be epistatic to the effected genes. Genes whose expression is affected (blocked or masked) are hypostatic to the interfering genes
  1
 

Gene-Gene Interactions, Epistatic -- See Epistasis, Genetic


A form of gene interaction whereby the expression of one gene interferes with or masks the expression of a different gene or genes. Genes whose expression interferes with or masks the effects of other genes are said to be epistatic to the effected genes. Genes whose expression is affected (blocked or masked) are hypostatic to the interfering genes
  1
 

Gene, Growth Suppressor -- See Genes, Tumor Suppressor


Genes that inhibit expression of the tumorigenic phenotype. They are normally involved in holding cellular growth in check. When tumor suppressor genes are inactivated or lost, a barrier to normal proliferation is removed and unregulated growth is possible
  1
 

Gene, Ha-ras -- See Genes, ras


Family of retrovirus-associated DNA sequences (ras) originally isolated from Harvey (H-ras, Ha-ras, rasH) and Kirsten (K-ras, Ki-ras, rasK) murine sarcoma viruses. Ras genes are widely conserved among animal species and sequences corresponding to both H-ras and K-ras genes have been detected in human, avian, murine, and non-vertebrate genomes. The closely related N-ras gene has been detected in human neuroblastoma and sarcoma cell lines. All genes of the family have a similar exon-intron structure and each encodes a p21 protein
  1
 

Gene, HER2 -- See Genes, erbB-2


The erbB-2 gene is a proto-oncogene that codes for the erbB-2 receptor (RECEPTOR, ERBB-2), a protein with structural features similar to the epidermal growth factor receptor. Its name originates from the viral oncogene homolog (v-erbB) which is a truncated form of the chicken erbB gene found in the avian erythroblastosis virus. Overexpression and amplification of the gene is associated with a significant number of adenocarcinomas. The human c-erbB-2 gene is located at 17q21.2
  1
 

Gene, Homeo Box -- See Genes, Homeobox


Genes that encode highly conserved TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS that control positional identity of cells (BODY PATTERNING) and MORPHOGENESIS throughout development. Their sequences contain a 180 nucleotide sequence designated the homeobox, so called because mutations of these genes often results in homeotic transformations, in which one body structure replaces another. The proteins encoded by homeobox genes are called HOMEODOMAIN PROTEINS
  1
 

Gene, Homeobox -- See Genes, Homeobox


Genes that encode highly conserved TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS that control positional identity of cells (BODY PATTERNING) and MORPHOGENESIS throughout development. Their sequences contain a 180 nucleotide sequence designated the homeobox, so called because mutations of these genes often results in homeotic transformations, in which one body structure replaces another. The proteins encoded by homeobox genes are called HOMEODOMAIN PROTEINS
  1
 

Gene, Homeotic -- See Genes, Homeobox


Genes that encode highly conserved TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS that control positional identity of cells (BODY PATTERNING) and MORPHOGENESIS throughout development. Their sequences contain a 180 nucleotide sequence designated the homeobox, so called because mutations of these genes often results in homeotic transformations, in which one body structure replaces another. The proteins encoded by homeobox genes are called HOMEODOMAIN PROTEINS
  1
 

Gene, Hox -- See Genes, Homeobox


Genes that encode highly conserved TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS that control positional identity of cells (BODY PATTERNING) and MORPHOGENESIS throughout development. Their sequences contain a 180 nucleotide sequence designated the homeobox, so called because mutations of these genes often results in homeotic transformations, in which one body structure replaces another. The proteins encoded by homeobox genes are called HOMEODOMAIN PROTEINS
  1
 

Gene, Hypostatic -- See Epistasis, Genetic


A form of gene interaction whereby the expression of one gene interferes with or masks the expression of a different gene or genes. Genes whose expression interferes with or masks the effects of other genes are said to be epistatic to the effected genes. Genes whose expression is affected (blocked or masked) are hypostatic to the interfering genes
  1
 

Gene Identification, Candidate -- See Genetic Association Studies


The analysis of a sequence such as a region of a chromosome, a haplotype, a gene, or an allele for its involvement in controlling the phenotype of a specific trait, metabolic pathway, or disease
  1
 

Gene imprinting -- See Genomic imprinting


  1
  Gene inactivation -- 2 Related Subjects   2
 

Gene, Insect -- See Genes, Insect


The functional hereditary units of INSECTS
  1
  Gene insertion -- 2 Related Subjects   2
 

Gene Insertions -- See Mutagenesis, Insertional


Mutagenesis where the mutation is caused by the introduction of foreign DNA sequences into a gene or extragenic sequence. This may occur spontaneously in vivo or be experimentally induced in vivo or in vitro. Proviral DNA insertions into or adjacent to a cellular proto-oncogene can interrupt GENETIC TRANSLATION of the coding sequences or interfere with recognition of regulatory elements and cause unregulated expression of the proto-oncogene resulting in tumor formation
  1
 

Gene Interaction, Non-Allelic -- See Epistasis, Genetic


A form of gene interaction whereby the expression of one gene interferes with or masks the expression of a different gene or genes. Genes whose expression interferes with or masks the effects of other genes are said to be epistatic to the effected genes. Genes whose expression is affected (blocked or masked) are hypostatic to the interfering genes
  1
 

Gene Interactions, Non-Allelic -- See Epistasis, Genetic


A form of gene interaction whereby the expression of one gene interferes with or masks the expression of a different gene or genes. Genes whose expression interferes with or masks the effects of other genes are said to be epistatic to the effected genes. Genes whose expression is affected (blocked or masked) are hypostatic to the interfering genes
  1
 

Gene, Jumping -- See Interspersed Repetitive Sequences


Copies of transposable elements interspersed throughout the genome, some of which are still active and often referred to as "jumping genes". There are two classes of interspersed repetitive elements. Class I elements (or RETROELEMENTS - such as retrotransposons, retroviruses, LONG INTERSPERSED NUCLEOTIDE ELEMENTS and SHORT INTERSPERSED NUCLEOTIDE ELEMENTS) transpose via reverse transcription of an RNA intermediate. Class II elements (or DNA TRANSPOSABLE ELEMENTS - such as transposons, Tn elements, insertion sequence elements and mobile gene cassettes of bacterial integrons) transpose directly from one site in the DNA to another
  1
 

Gene, Ki-ras -- See Genes, ras


Family of retrovirus-associated DNA sequences (ras) originally isolated from Harvey (H-ras, Ha-ras, rasH) and Kirsten (K-ras, Ki-ras, rasK) murine sarcoma viruses. Ras genes are widely conserved among animal species and sequences corresponding to both H-ras and K-ras genes have been detected in human, avian, murine, and non-vertebrate genomes. The closely related N-ras gene has been detected in human neuroblastoma and sarcoma cell lines. All genes of the family have a similar exon-intron structure and each encodes a p21 protein
  1
 

Gene Knock In -- See Gene Knock-In Techniques


Techniques used to add in exogenous gene sequence such as mutated genes; REPORTER GENES, to study mechanisms of gene expression; or regulatory control sequences, to study effects of temporal changes to GENE EXPRESSION
  1
 

Gene Knock-In Technique -- See Gene Knock-In Techniques


Techniques used to add in exogenous gene sequence such as mutated genes; REPORTER GENES, to study mechanisms of gene expression; or regulatory control sequences, to study effects of temporal changes to GENE EXPRESSION
  1
Gene Knock-In Techniques. : Turning genomic junk into treasure : genetic engineering with the Sleeping Beauty transposon system / Zoltan Ivics  2014 1
 

Gene Knock Ins -- See Gene Knock-In Techniques


Techniques used to add in exogenous gene sequence such as mutated genes; REPORTER GENES, to study mechanisms of gene expression; or regulatory control sequences, to study effects of temporal changes to GENE EXPRESSION
  1
 

Gene Knockout Techniques -- See Also Mice, Knockout


Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes
  1
 

Gene, L-myc -- See Genes, myc


Family of retrovirus-associated DNA sequences (myc) originally isolated from an avian myelocytomatosis virus. The proto-oncogene myc (c-myc) codes for a nuclear protein which is involved in nucleic acid metabolism and in mediating the cellular response to growth factors. Truncation of the first exon, which appears to regulate c-myc expression, is crucial for tumorigenicity. The human c-myc gene is located at 8q24 on the long arm of chromosome 8
  1
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