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Genes, Neoplasm -- Periodicals : Genes & cancer (Online)    1
Genes, Neoplasm -- physiology. : Cancer systems biology / edited by Edwin Wang  2010 1
 

Genes, neu -- See Genes, erbB-2


The erbB-2 gene is a proto-oncogene that codes for the erbB-2 receptor (RECEPTOR, ERBB-2), a protein with structural features similar to the epidermal growth factor receptor. Its name originates from the viral oncogene homolog (v-erbB) which is a truncated form of the chicken erbB gene found in the avian erythroblastosis virus. Overexpression and amplification of the gene is associated with a significant number of adenocarcinomas. The human c-erbB-2 gene is located at 17q21.2
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Genes, Neurofibromatosis 1 -- See Also Neurofibromatosis 1


An autosomal dominant inherited disorder (with a high frequency of spontaneous mutations) that features developmental changes in the nervous system, muscles, bones, and skin, most notably in tissue derived from the embryonic NEURAL CREST. Multiple hyperpigmented skin lesions and subcutaneous tumors are the hallmark of this disease. Peripheral and central nervous system neoplasms occur frequently, especially OPTIC NERVE GLIOMA and NEUROFIBROSARCOMA. NF1 is caused by mutations which inactivate the NF1 gene (GENES, NEUROFIBROMATOSIS 1) on chromosome 17q. The incidence of learning disabilities is also elevated in this condition. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1014-18) There is overlap of clinical features with NOONAN SYNDROME in a syndrome called neurofibromatosis-Noonan syndrome. Both the PTPN11 and NF1 gene products are involved in the SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION pathway of Ras (RAS PROTEINS)
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Genes, Neurofibromatosis 2. : NF2 & Gorlins / D. Gareth R. Evans  2014 1
 

Genes, nf 2 -- See Genes, Neurofibromatosis 2


Tumor suppressor genes located on the long arm of human chromosome 22. Mutation or loss of these genes causes NEUROFIBROMATOSIS 2
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Genes, nf2 -- See Genes, Neurofibromatosis 2


Tumor suppressor genes located on the long arm of human chromosome 22. Mutation or loss of these genes causes NEUROFIBROMATOSIS 2
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Genes, Onco-Suppressor -- See Genes, Tumor Suppressor


Genes that inhibit expression of the tumorigenic phenotype. They are normally involved in holding cellular growth in check. When tumor suppressor genes are inactivated or lost, a barrier to normal proliferation is removed and unregulated growth is possible
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Genes, Overlapping. : Information- and communication theory in molecular biology / Martin Bossert, editor  2018 1
 

Genes, p53 -- See Also Tumor Suppressor Protein p53


Nuclear phosphoprotein encoded by the p53 gene (GENES, P53) whose normal function is to control CELL PROLIFERATION and APOPTOSIS. A mutant or absent p53 protein has been found in LEUKEMIA; OSTEOSARCOMA; LUNG CANCER; and COLORECTAL CANCER
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Genes, p53.   6
Genes, p53 -- genetics. : DNA research, genetics, and cell biology / editor, Tsisana Shartava  2011 1
Genes, p53 -- physiology. : 25 years of p53 research / edited by Pierre Hainaut and Klas G. Wiman  2005 1
Genes -- Patents.   8
Genes -- Periodicals   7
Genes -- Philosophy.   2
Genes -- physiology.   5
 

Genes, Plant -- See Also Genome, Plant


The genetic complement of a plant (PLANTS) as represented in its DNA
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Genes, Plant.   2
 

Genes, Pleiotropic -- See Genetic Pleiotropy


A phenomenon in which multiple and diverse phenotypic outcomes are influenced by a single gene (or single gene product.)
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Genes -- Popular works. : The language of the genes : biology, history and the evolutionary future / Steve Jones  1994 1
  Genes, ras -- 2 Related Subjects   2
Genes, ras.   2
 

Genes, Regulator -- See Also Transcriptional Activation


Processes that stimulate the GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION of a gene or set of genes
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Genes, Reiterated -- See Multigene Family


A set of genes descended by duplication and variation from some ancestral gene. Such genes may be clustered together on the same chromosome or dispersed on different chromosomes. Examples of multigene families include those that encode the hemoglobins, immunoglobulins, histocompatibility antigens, actins, tubulins, keratins, collagens, heat shock proteins, salivary glue proteins, chorion proteins, cuticle proteins, yolk proteins, and phaseolins, as well as histones, ribosomal RNA, and transfer RNA genes. The latter three are examples of reiterated genes, where hundreds of identical genes are present in a tandem array. (King & Stanfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)
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Genes, Reporter. : Molecular imaging with reporter genes / edited by Sanjiv Sam Gambhir, Shahriar S. Yaghoubi  2010 1
Genes, Reporter -- genetics. : Bacterial sensors : synthetic design and application principles / Jan Roelof van der Meer  2011 1
Genes -- Research -- History. : Proteins, enzymes, genes : the interplay of chemistry and biology / Joseph S. Fruton  1999 1
Genes -- Research -- Periodicals : DNA research (Online)    1
 

Genes, Retinoblastoma -- See Also Retinoblastoma


A malignant tumor arising from the nuclear layer of the retina that is the most common primary tumor of the eye in children. The tumor tends to occur in early childhood or infancy and may be present at birth. The majority are sporadic, but the condition may be transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait. Histologic features include dense cellularity, small round polygonal cells, and areas of calcification and necrosis. An abnormal pupil reflex (leukokoria); NYSTAGMUS, PATHOLOGIC; STRABISMUS; and visual loss represent common clinical characteristics of this condition. (From DeVita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, p2104)
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Genes, Retinoblastoma -- physiology. : Rb and tumorigenesis / [edited by] Maurizio Fanciulli  2006 1
 

Genes, Selfish -- See Repetitive Sequences, Nucleic Acid


Sequences of DNA or RNA that occur in multiple copies. There are several types: INTERSPERSED REPETITIVE SEQUENCES are copies of transposable elements (DNA TRANSPOSABLE ELEMENTS or RETROELEMENTS) dispersed throughout the genome. TERMINAL REPEAT SEQUENCES flank both ends of another sequence, for example, the long terminal repeats (LTRs) on RETROVIRUSES. Variations may be direct repeats, those occurring in the same direction, or inverted repeats, those opposite to each other in direction. TANDEM REPEAT SEQUENCES are copies which lie adjacent to each other, direct or inverted (INVERTED REPEAT SEQUENCES)
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Genes -- Social aspects.   2
 

Genes, Spliced -- See DNA, Recombinant


Biologically active DNA which has been formed by the in vitro joining of segments of DNA from different sources. It includes the recombination joint or edge of a heteroduplex region where two recombining DNA molecules are connected
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Genes, src. : Three decades of protein phosphorylation and cancer : the identification and characterization of the src gene product / Raymond L. Erikson  2010 1
 

Genes, sry -- See Also Sex Determination Processes


The mechanisms by which the SEX of an individual's GONADS are fixed
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Genes, Switch.   2
Genes, Synthetic.   2
 

Genes, T-Cell Receptor -- See Also Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell


Molecules on the surface of T-lymphocytes that recognize and combine with antigens. The receptors are non-covalently associated with a complex of several polypeptides collectively called CD3 antigens (CD3 COMPLEX). Recognition of foreign antigen and the major histocompatibility complex is accomplished by a single heterodimeric antigen-receptor structure, composed of either alpha-beta (RECEPTORS, ANTIGEN, T-CELL, ALPHA-BETA) or gamma-delta (RECEPTORS, ANTIGEN, T-CELL, GAMMA-DELTA) chains
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Genes, T-Cell Receptor. : The T cell receptor factsbook / Marie-Paule Lefranc, GĂ©rard Lefranc  2001 1
 

Genes, T-Cell Receptor delta -- See Also Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell, gamma-delta


T-cell receptors composed of CD3-associated gamma and delta polypeptide chains and expressed primarily in CD4-/CD8- T-cells. The receptors appear to be preferentially located in epithelial sites and probably play a role in the recognition of bacterial antigens. The T-cell receptor gamma/delta chains are separate and not related to the gamma and delta chains which are subunits of CD3 (see ANTIGENS, CD3)
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Genes, T-Cell Receptor delta. : Gamma-delta T cells / volume editors, Paul R. Bergstresser, A. Takashima  2001 1
 

Genes, T-Cell Receptor gamma -- See Also Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell, gamma-delta


T-cell receptors composed of CD3-associated gamma and delta polypeptide chains and expressed primarily in CD4-/CD8- T-cells. The receptors appear to be preferentially located in epithelial sites and probably play a role in the recognition of bacterial antigens. The T-cell receptor gamma/delta chains are separate and not related to the gamma and delta chains which are subunits of CD3 (see ANTIGENS, CD3)
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Genes, T-Cell Receptor gamma. : Gamma-delta T cells / volume editors, Paul R. Bergstresser, A. Takashima  2001 1
 

Genes, TcR -- See Genes, T-Cell Receptor


DNA sequences, in cells of the T-lymphocyte lineage, that code for T-cell receptors. The TcR genes are formed by somatic rearrangement (see GENE REARRANGEMENT, T-LYMPHOCYTE and its children) of germline gene segments, and resemble Ig genes in their mechanisms of diversity generation and expression
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Genes, TcR delta -- See Genes, T-Cell Receptor delta


DNA sequences encoding the delta chain of the T-cell receptor. The delta-chain locus is located entirely within the alpha-chain locus
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Genes, TcR gamma -- See Genes, T-Cell Receptor gamma


DNA sequences encoding the gamma chain of the T-cell receptor. The human gamma-chain locus is organized similarly to the TcR beta-chain locus
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Genes, TP53 -- See Genes, p53


Tumor suppressor genes located on the short arm of human chromosome 17 and coding for the phosphoprotein p53
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Genes, Transforming -- See Oncogenes


Genes whose gain-of-function alterations lead to NEOPLASTIC CELL TRANSFORMATION. They include, for example, genes for activators or stimulators of CELL PROLIFERATION such as growth factors, growth factor receptors, protein kinases, signal transducers, nuclear phosphoproteins, and transcription factors. A prefix of "v-" before oncogene symbols indicates oncogenes captured and transmitted by RETROVIRUSES; the prefix "c-" before the gene symbol of an oncogene indicates it is the cellular homolog (PROTO-ONCOGENES) of a v-oncogene
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  Genes, Transgenic, Suicide -- 2 Related Subjects   2
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