Limit search to available items
Nearby Subjects are:
Result Page   Prev Next
Add Marked to Bag Add All On Page Add Marked to My Lists
Mark   Year Entries
 

Muscular Contraction -- See Muscle Contraction


A process leading to shortening and/or development of tension in muscle tissue. Muscle contraction occurs by a sliding filament mechanism whereby actin filaments slide inward among the myosin filaments
  1
 

Muscular Contractions -- See Muscle Contraction


A process leading to shortening and/or development of tension in muscle tissue. Muscle contraction occurs by a sliding filament mechanism whereby actin filaments slide inward among the myosin filaments
  1
 

Muscular coordination -- See Motor ability


  1
 

Muscular Disease -- See Muscular Diseases


Acquired, familial, and congenital disorders of SKELETAL MUSCLE and SMOOTH MUSCLE
  1
Muscular Diseases.   11
Muscular Diseases -- diagnosis.   2
Muscular Diseases -- genetics. : Muscle Disease : Pathology and Genetics / edited by Hans H. Goebel, Caroline A. Sewry, Roy O. Weller  2013 1
Muscular Diseases -- nursing. : The skeletal system and the muscular system / edited by Janet T.E. Riddle ; with contributions from Kathleen B. Nicoll, Isabella I. Rowantree  1989 1
Muscular Diseases -- pathology.   3
Muscular Diseases -- therapy.   3
 

Muscular Disorder, Atrophic -- See Muscular Disorders, Atrophic


Disorders characterized by an abnormal reduction in muscle volume due to a decrease in the size or number of muscle fibers. Atrophy may result from diseases intrinsic to muscle tissue (e.g., MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY) or secondary to PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES that impair innervation to muscle tissue (e.g., MUSCULAR ATROPHY, SPINAL)
  1
 

Muscular Disorders, Atrophic -- See Also Muscular Atrophy


Derangement in size and number of muscle fibers occurring with aging, reduction in blood supply, or following immobilization, prolonged weightlessness, malnutrition, and particularly in denervation
  1
Muscular Disorders, Atrophic. : Mechanisms of pathogenesis and molecular targets in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy / Carlo Rinaldi  2016 1
 

Muscular dystrophies -- See Muscular dystrophy


  1
Muscular Dystrophies.   4
Muscular Dystrophies -- genetics.   2
Muscular Dystrophies -- history. : The history of a genetic disease : Duchenne muscular dystrophy or Meryon's disease / Alan E. H. Emery & Marcia L. H. Emery  1995 1
Muscular Dystrophies -- psychology. : Muscular dystrophy and other neuromuscular diseases : psychosocial issues / Leon I. Charash [and others], editors ; Jill C. Crabtree, editor for the Foundation of Thanatology  1991 1
Muscular Dystrophies -- therapy. : Gene therapy for the muscular dystrophies / Jeffrey S. Chamberlain  2014 1
 

Muscular Dystrophy -- See Muscular Dystrophies


A heterogeneous group of inherited MYOPATHIES, characterized by wasting and weakness of the SKELETAL MUSCLE. They are categorized by the sites of MUSCLE WEAKNESS; AGE OF ONSET; and INHERITANCE PATTERNS
  1
Muscular dystrophy.   9
Muscular dystrophy -- Animal models -- Congresses. : The Biochemistry of myasthenia gravis and muscular dystrophy / edited by G. G. Lunt and R. M. Marchbanks  1978 1
 

Muscular Dystrophy, Becker -- See Muscular Dystrophy, Duchenne


An X-linked recessive muscle disease caused by an inability to synthesize DYSTROPHIN, which is involved with maintaining the integrity of the sarcolemma. Muscle fibers undergo a process that features degeneration and regeneration. Clinical manifestations include proximal weakness in the first few years of life, pseudohypertrophy, cardiomyopathy (see MYOCARDIAL DISEASES), and an increased incidence of impaired mentation. Becker muscular dystrophy is a closely related condition featuring a later onset of disease (usually adolescence) and a slowly progressive course. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1415)
  1
 

Muscular Dystrophy, Becker Type -- See Muscular Dystrophy, Duchenne


An X-linked recessive muscle disease caused by an inability to synthesize DYSTROPHIN, which is involved with maintaining the integrity of the sarcolemma. Muscle fibers undergo a process that features degeneration and regeneration. Clinical manifestations include proximal weakness in the first few years of life, pseudohypertrophy, cardiomyopathy (see MYOCARDIAL DISEASES), and an increased incidence of impaired mentation. Becker muscular dystrophy is a closely related condition featuring a later onset of disease (usually adolescence) and a slowly progressive course. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1415)
  1
 

Muscular Dystrophy, Becker's -- See Muscular Dystrophy, Duchenne


An X-linked recessive muscle disease caused by an inability to synthesize DYSTROPHIN, which is involved with maintaining the integrity of the sarcolemma. Muscle fibers undergo a process that features degeneration and regeneration. Clinical manifestations include proximal weakness in the first few years of life, pseudohypertrophy, cardiomyopathy (see MYOCARDIAL DISEASES), and an increased incidence of impaired mentation. Becker muscular dystrophy is a closely related condition featuring a later onset of disease (usually adolescence) and a slowly progressive course. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1415)
  1
 

Muscular Dystrophy, Childhood, Pseudohypertrophic -- See Muscular Dystrophy, Duchenne


An X-linked recessive muscle disease caused by an inability to synthesize DYSTROPHIN, which is involved with maintaining the integrity of the sarcolemma. Muscle fibers undergo a process that features degeneration and regeneration. Clinical manifestations include proximal weakness in the first few years of life, pseudohypertrophy, cardiomyopathy (see MYOCARDIAL DISEASES), and an increased incidence of impaired mentation. Becker muscular dystrophy is a closely related condition featuring a later onset of disease (usually adolescence) and a slowly progressive course. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1415)
  1
Muscular dystrophy -- Congresses. : The Biochemistry of myasthenia gravis and muscular dystrophy / edited by G. G. Lunt and R. M. Marchbanks  1978 1
Muscular dystrophy -- Diagnosis. : Muscular dystrophy : a concise guide / Raymond A. Huml, editor  2015 1
 

Muscular Dystrophy, Duchenne -- See Also Dystrophin


A muscle protein localized in surface membranes which is the product of the Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy gene. Individuals with Duchenne muscular dystrophy usually lack dystrophin completely while those with Becker muscular dystrophy have dystrophin of an altered size. It shares features with other cytoskeletal proteins such as SPECTRIN and alpha-actinin but the precise function of dystrophin is not clear. One possible role might be to preserve the integrity and alignment of the plasma membrane to the myofibrils during muscle contraction and relaxation. MW 400 kDa
  1
Muscular Dystrophy, Duchenne.   2
 

Muscular Dystrophy, Duchenne and Becker Types -- See Muscular Dystrophy, Duchenne


An X-linked recessive muscle disease caused by an inability to synthesize DYSTROPHIN, which is involved with maintaining the integrity of the sarcolemma. Muscle fibers undergo a process that features degeneration and regeneration. Clinical manifestations include proximal weakness in the first few years of life, pseudohypertrophy, cardiomyopathy (see MYOCARDIAL DISEASES), and an increased incidence of impaired mentation. Becker muscular dystrophy is a closely related condition featuring a later onset of disease (usually adolescence) and a slowly progressive course. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1415)
  1
 

Muscular Dystrophy, Duchenne-Becker -- See Muscular Dystrophy, Duchenne


An X-linked recessive muscle disease caused by an inability to synthesize DYSTROPHIN, which is involved with maintaining the integrity of the sarcolemma. Muscle fibers undergo a process that features degeneration and regeneration. Clinical manifestations include proximal weakness in the first few years of life, pseudohypertrophy, cardiomyopathy (see MYOCARDIAL DISEASES), and an increased incidence of impaired mentation. Becker muscular dystrophy is a closely related condition featuring a later onset of disease (usually adolescence) and a slowly progressive course. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1415)
  1
Muscular Dystrophy, Duchenne -- genetics.   2
Muscular Dystrophy, Duchenne -- psychology.   2
Muscular Dystrophy, Duchenne -- therapy.   5
 

Muscular Dystrophy, Duchenne Type -- See Muscular Dystrophy, Duchenne


An X-linked recessive muscle disease caused by an inability to synthesize DYSTROPHIN, which is involved with maintaining the integrity of the sarcolemma. Muscle fibers undergo a process that features degeneration and regeneration. Clinical manifestations include proximal weakness in the first few years of life, pseudohypertrophy, cardiomyopathy (see MYOCARDIAL DISEASES), and an increased incidence of impaired mentation. Becker muscular dystrophy is a closely related condition featuring a later onset of disease (usually adolescence) and a slowly progressive course. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1415)
  1
Muscular dystrophy -- Gene therapy. : Gene therapy for the muscular dystrophies / Jeffrey S. Chamberlain  2014 1
Muscular dystrophy -- Genetic aspects. : Gene therapy for the muscular dystrophies / Jeffrey S. Chamberlain  2014 1
Muscular dystrophy -- History. : The history of a genetic disease : Duchenne muscular dystrophy or Meryon's disease / Alan E. H. Emery & Marcia L. H. Emery  1995 1
 

Muscular dystrophy in children -- See Also the narrower term Duchenne muscular dystrophy


  1
Muscular dystrophy in children -- Patients.   2
Muscular dystrophy in children -- Popular works. : Muscular dystrophy in children : a guide for families / Irwin M. Siegel  1999 1
Muscular dystrophy -- Juvenile fiction. : See ya, Simon / David Hill  1995 1
Muscular dystrophy -- Popular works.   3
 

Muscular Dystrophy, Pseudohypertrophic -- See Muscular Dystrophy, Duchenne


An X-linked recessive muscle disease caused by an inability to synthesize DYSTROPHIN, which is involved with maintaining the integrity of the sarcolemma. Muscle fibers undergo a process that features degeneration and regeneration. Clinical manifestations include proximal weakness in the first few years of life, pseudohypertrophy, cardiomyopathy (see MYOCARDIAL DISEASES), and an increased incidence of impaired mentation. Becker muscular dystrophy is a closely related condition featuring a later onset of disease (usually adolescence) and a slowly progressive course. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1415)
  1
 

Muscular Dystrophy, Pseudohypertrophic, Childhood -- See Muscular Dystrophy, Duchenne


An X-linked recessive muscle disease caused by an inability to synthesize DYSTROPHIN, which is involved with maintaining the integrity of the sarcolemma. Muscle fibers undergo a process that features degeneration and regeneration. Clinical manifestations include proximal weakness in the first few years of life, pseudohypertrophy, cardiomyopathy (see MYOCARDIAL DISEASES), and an increased incidence of impaired mentation. Becker muscular dystrophy is a closely related condition featuring a later onset of disease (usually adolescence) and a slowly progressive course. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1415)
  1
 

Muscular Dystrophy Pseudohypertrophic Progressive, Becker Type -- See Muscular Dystrophy, Duchenne


An X-linked recessive muscle disease caused by an inability to synthesize DYSTROPHIN, which is involved with maintaining the integrity of the sarcolemma. Muscle fibers undergo a process that features degeneration and regeneration. Clinical manifestations include proximal weakness in the first few years of life, pseudohypertrophy, cardiomyopathy (see MYOCARDIAL DISEASES), and an increased incidence of impaired mentation. Becker muscular dystrophy is a closely related condition featuring a later onset of disease (usually adolescence) and a slowly progressive course. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1415)
  1
 

Muscular Dystrophy, Pseudohypertrophic Progressive, Duchenne Type -- See Muscular Dystrophy, Duchenne


An X-linked recessive muscle disease caused by an inability to synthesize DYSTROPHIN, which is involved with maintaining the integrity of the sarcolemma. Muscle fibers undergo a process that features degeneration and regeneration. Clinical manifestations include proximal weakness in the first few years of life, pseudohypertrophy, cardiomyopathy (see MYOCARDIAL DISEASES), and an increased incidence of impaired mentation. Becker muscular dystrophy is a closely related condition featuring a later onset of disease (usually adolescence) and a slowly progressive course. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1415)
  1
Muscular dystrophy -- Psychological aspects : Muscular dystrophy and other neuromuscular diseases : psychosocial issues / Leon I. Charash [and others], editors ; Jill C. Crabtree, editor for the Foundation of Thanatology  1991 1
Muscular dystrophy -- Research.   2
Add Marked to Bag Add All On Page Add Marked to My Lists
Result Page   Prev Next