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Parallelograms -- See Also the narrower term Rectangles


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Parallelograms. : Cyberchase: The Flying Parallinis - Series 5, Ep 1 of 8 / Director: Groh, Jason  2013 1
  Parallels (Geometry) -- 2 Related Subjects   2
Parallels (Geometry)   2
Paralympic Games.   7
Paralympic Games (30th : 2012 : London, England) / http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n78064382 : Handbook of the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic games : volume one : making the games / edited by Vassil Girginov  2013 1
Paralympic Games -- History. / http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n78064382 http://id.loc.gov/authorities/subjects/sh99005024 : Athlete first : a history of the paralympic movement / Steve Bailey  2008 1
 

Paralympics -- See Paralympic Games


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Paralympics.   34
Paralympics (10th : 1996 : Atlanta, Ga) : Blythe Spirit / Sandy Blythe  2000 1
Paralympics. 11th 2000 Sydney, N.S.W   2
Paralympics (11th :, 2000 : Sydney, N.S.W.) -- Juvenile literature : Louise Sauvage / Barrie Sheppard  2002 1
Paralympics. 11th 2000 Sydney, N.S.W -- Social aspects : Benchmark games : the Sydney 2000 Paralympic Games / [edited by] Richard Cashman and Simon Darcy ; with a foreword by Karen Tighe  2008 1
 

Paralyses -- See Paralysis


A general term most often used to describe severe or complete loss of muscle strength due to motor system disease from the level of the cerebral cortex to the muscle fiber. This term may also occasionally refer to a loss of sensory function. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p45)
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Paralyses, Central Facial -- See Facial Paralysis


Severe or complete loss of facial muscle motor function. This condition may result from central or peripheral lesions. Damage to CNS motor pathways from the cerebral cortex to the facial nuclei in the pons leads to facial weakness that generally spares the forehead muscles. FACIAL NERVE DISEASES generally results in generalized hemifacial weakness. NEUROMUSCULAR JUNCTION DISEASES and MUSCULAR DISEASES may also cause facial paralysis or paresis
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Paralyses, Erb -- See Brachial Plexus Neuropathies


Diseases of the cervical (and first thoracic) roots, nerve trunks, cords, and peripheral nerve components of the BRACHIAL PLEXUS. Clinical manifestations include regional pain, PARESTHESIA; MUSCLE WEAKNESS, and decreased sensation (HYPESTHESIA) in the upper extremity. These disorders may be associated with trauma (including BIRTH INJURIES); THORACIC OUTLET SYNDROME; NEOPLASMS; NEURITIS; RADIOTHERAPY; and other conditions. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1351-2)
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Paralyses, Erb-Duchenne -- See Brachial Plexus Neuropathies


Diseases of the cervical (and first thoracic) roots, nerve trunks, cords, and peripheral nerve components of the BRACHIAL PLEXUS. Clinical manifestations include regional pain, PARESTHESIA; MUSCLE WEAKNESS, and decreased sensation (HYPESTHESIA) in the upper extremity. These disorders may be associated with trauma (including BIRTH INJURIES); THORACIC OUTLET SYNDROME; NEOPLASMS; NEURITIS; RADIOTHERAPY; and other conditions. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1351-2)
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Paralyses, Facial -- See Facial Paralysis


Severe or complete loss of facial muscle motor function. This condition may result from central or peripheral lesions. Damage to CNS motor pathways from the cerebral cortex to the facial nuclei in the pons leads to facial weakness that generally spares the forehead muscles. FACIAL NERVE DISEASES generally results in generalized hemifacial weakness. NEUROMUSCULAR JUNCTION DISEASES and MUSCULAR DISEASES may also cause facial paralysis or paresis
  1
 

Paralyses, Fowl -- See Marek Disease


A transmissible viral disease of birds caused by avian herpesvirus 2 (HERPESVIRUS 2, GALLID) and other MARDIVIRUS. There is lymphoid cell infiltration or lymphomatous tumor formation in the peripheral nerves and gonads, but may also involve visceral organs, skin, muscle, and the eye
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Paralyses, Hemifacial -- See Facial Paralysis


Severe or complete loss of facial muscle motor function. This condition may result from central or peripheral lesions. Damage to CNS motor pathways from the cerebral cortex to the facial nuclei in the pons leads to facial weakness that generally spares the forehead muscles. FACIAL NERVE DISEASES generally results in generalized hemifacial weakness. NEUROMUSCULAR JUNCTION DISEASES and MUSCULAR DISEASES may also cause facial paralysis or paresis
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Paralyses, Laryngeal -- See Vocal Cord Paralysis


Congenital or acquired paralysis of one or both VOCAL CORDS. This condition is caused by defects in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, the VAGUS NERVE and branches of LARYNGEAL NERVES. Common symptoms are VOICE DISORDERS including HOARSENESS or APHONIA
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Paralyses, Vocal Cord -- See Vocal Cord Paralysis


Congenital or acquired paralysis of one or both VOCAL CORDS. This condition is caused by defects in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, the VAGUS NERVE and branches of LARYNGEAL NERVES. Common symptoms are VOICE DISORDERS including HOARSENESS or APHONIA
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  Paralysis -- 5 Related Subjects   5
Paralysis.   5
  Paralysis Agitans -- 2 Related Subjects   2
 

Paralysis, Anterior spinal -- See Poliomyelitis


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Arm -- Paralysis. : Restoration of function in upper limb paralyses and muscular defects / edited by Raoul Tubiana [and others]  2009 1
Brachial plexus -- Paralysis. : Brachial plexus palsy / editors, H. Kawai, H. Kawabata  2000 1
 

Paralysis, Central Facial -- See Facial Paralysis


Severe or complete loss of facial muscle motor function. This condition may result from central or peripheral lesions. Damage to CNS motor pathways from the cerebral cortex to the facial nuclei in the pons leads to facial weakness that generally spares the forehead muscles. FACIAL NERVE DISEASES generally results in generalized hemifacial weakness. NEUROMUSCULAR JUNCTION DISEASES and MUSCULAR DISEASES may also cause facial paralysis or paresis
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Paralysis, Cerebral -- See Cerebral palsy


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Paralysis, Erb -- See Brachial Plexus Neuropathies


Diseases of the cervical (and first thoracic) roots, nerve trunks, cords, and peripheral nerve components of the BRACHIAL PLEXUS. Clinical manifestations include regional pain, PARESTHESIA; MUSCLE WEAKNESS, and decreased sensation (HYPESTHESIA) in the upper extremity. These disorders may be associated with trauma (including BIRTH INJURIES); THORACIC OUTLET SYNDROME; NEOPLASMS; NEURITIS; RADIOTHERAPY; and other conditions. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1351-2)
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Paralysis, Erb-Duchenne -- See Brachial Plexus Neuropathies


Diseases of the cervical (and first thoracic) roots, nerve trunks, cords, and peripheral nerve components of the BRACHIAL PLEXUS. Clinical manifestations include regional pain, PARESTHESIA; MUSCLE WEAKNESS, and decreased sensation (HYPESTHESIA) in the upper extremity. These disorders may be associated with trauma (including BIRTH INJURIES); THORACIC OUTLET SYNDROME; NEOPLASMS; NEURITIS; RADIOTHERAPY; and other conditions. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1351-2)
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Eye -- Paralysis   2
  Paralysis, Facial -- 2 Related Subjects   2
 

Paralysis, Fowl -- See Marek Disease


A transmissible viral disease of birds caused by avian herpesvirus 2 (HERPESVIRUS 2, GALLID) and other MARDIVIRUS. There is lymphoid cell infiltration or lymphomatous tumor formation in the peripheral nerves and gonads, but may also involve visceral organs, skin, muscle, and the eye
  1
 

Paralysis, Hemifacial -- See Facial Paralysis


Severe or complete loss of facial muscle motor function. This condition may result from central or peripheral lesions. Damage to CNS motor pathways from the cerebral cortex to the facial nuclei in the pons leads to facial weakness that generally spares the forehead muscles. FACIAL NERVE DISEASES generally results in generalized hemifacial weakness. NEUROMUSCULAR JUNCTION DISEASES and MUSCULAR DISEASES may also cause facial paralysis or paresis
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  Paralysis, Infantile -- 2 Related Subjects   2
Paralysis -- Juvenile fiction. : The girl from the sea / James Aldridge  2002 1
 

Paralysis, Klumpke -- See Brachial Plexus Neuropathies


Diseases of the cervical (and first thoracic) roots, nerve trunks, cords, and peripheral nerve components of the BRACHIAL PLEXUS. Clinical manifestations include regional pain, PARESTHESIA; MUSCLE WEAKNESS, and decreased sensation (HYPESTHESIA) in the upper extremity. These disorders may be associated with trauma (including BIRTH INJURIES); THORACIC OUTLET SYNDROME; NEOPLASMS; NEURITIS; RADIOTHERAPY; and other conditions. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1351-2)
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Paralysis, Laryngeal -- See Vocal Cord Paralysis


Congenital or acquired paralysis of one or both VOCAL CORDS. This condition is caused by defects in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, the VAGUS NERVE and branches of LARYNGEAL NERVES. Common symptoms are VOICE DISORDERS including HOARSENESS or APHONIA
  1
 

Paralysis, Legs -- See Paraplegia


Severe or complete loss of motor function in the lower extremities and lower portions of the trunk. This condition is most often associated with SPINAL CORD DISEASES, although BRAIN DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES; and MUSCULAR DISEASES may also cause bilateral leg weakness
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Paralysis, Lower Extremities -- See Paraplegia


Severe or complete loss of motor function in the lower extremities and lower portions of the trunk. This condition is most often associated with SPINAL CORD DISEASES, although BRAIN DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES; and MUSCULAR DISEASES may also cause bilateral leg weakness
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Paralysis, Lower Limbs -- See Paraplegia


Severe or complete loss of motor function in the lower extremities and lower portions of the trunk. This condition is most often associated with SPINAL CORD DISEASES, although BRAIN DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES; and MUSCULAR DISEASES may also cause bilateral leg weakness
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Paralysis of the heart, Induced -- See Cardiac arrest, Induced


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Paralysis of the Lower Brachial Plexus -- See Brachial Plexus Neuropathies


Diseases of the cervical (and first thoracic) roots, nerve trunks, cords, and peripheral nerve components of the BRACHIAL PLEXUS. Clinical manifestations include regional pain, PARESTHESIA; MUSCLE WEAKNESS, and decreased sensation (HYPESTHESIA) in the upper extremity. These disorders may be associated with trauma (including BIRTH INJURIES); THORACIC OUTLET SYNDROME; NEOPLASMS; NEURITIS; RADIOTHERAPY; and other conditions. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1351-2)
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Paralysis Patients -- See Paralytics


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Paralysis, Peripheral Facial -- See Facial Paralysis


Severe or complete loss of facial muscle motor function. This condition may result from central or peripheral lesions. Damage to CNS motor pathways from the cerebral cortex to the facial nuclei in the pons leads to facial weakness that generally spares the forehead muscles. FACIAL NERVE DISEASES generally results in generalized hemifacial weakness. NEUROMUSCULAR JUNCTION DISEASES and MUSCULAR DISEASES may also cause facial paralysis or paresis
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Paralysis -- Popular works. : Life on wheels : the A to Z guide to living fully with mobility issues / Gary Karp  2009 1
Paralysis -- prevention & control. : Neuromuscular monitoring in clinical practice and research / Thomas Fuchs-Buder  2010 1
Paralysis -- Psychological aspects.   3
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