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Mark   Year Entries
Verbal ability.   2
Verbal ability -- Examinations, questions, etc.   2
Verbal ability in children.   15
Verbal ability in children -- Handbooks, manuals, etc.   2
Verbal ability in children -- Testing. : Assessing the oral language development and intervention needs of students / Patricia Myers with a contribution by Donald D. Hammill  1987 1
Verbal ability -- Problems, exercises, etc. : Verbal thinking : building the thinking-communication connection / by Marco Meirovitz, Stuart Dods  1991 1
Verbal ability -- Social aspects -- Congresses. : Rhetorical aspects of discourses in present-day society / edited by Lotte Dam, Lise-Lotte Holmgreen and Jeanne Strunck  2008 1
Verbal ability -- Study and teaching   2
Verbal ability -- Testing.   2
 

Verbal abuse -- See Invective


  1
 

Verbal abuse of children -- See Psychological child abuse


  1
 

Verbal agreements (Law) -- See Statute of frauds


  1
 

Verbal Aphasia Syndrome -- See Aphasia, Broca


An aphasia characterized by impairment of expressive LANGUAGE (speech, writing, signs) and relative preservation of receptive language abilities (i.e., comprehension). This condition is caused by lesions of the motor association cortex in the FRONTAL LOBE (BROCA AREA and adjacent cortical and white matter regions)
  1
 

Verbal Aphasia Syndromes -- See Aphasia, Broca


An aphasia characterized by impairment of expressive LANGUAGE (speech, writing, signs) and relative preservation of receptive language abilities (i.e., comprehension). This condition is caused by lesions of the motor association cortex in the FRONTAL LOBE (BROCA AREA and adjacent cortical and white matter regions)
  1
 

Verbal Apraxia -- See Apraxias


A group of cognitive disorders characterized by the inability to perform previously learned skills that cannot be attributed to deficits of motor or sensory function. The two major subtypes of this condition are ideomotor (see APRAXIA, IDEOMOTOR) and ideational apraxia, which refers to loss of the ability to mentally formulate the processes involved with performing an action. For example, dressing apraxia may result from an inability to mentally formulate the act of placing clothes on the body. Apraxias are generally associated with lesions of the dominant PARIETAL LOBE and supramarginal gyrus. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp56-7)
  1
 

Verbal Apraxia, Developmental -- See Apraxias


A group of cognitive disorders characterized by the inability to perform previously learned skills that cannot be attributed to deficits of motor or sensory function. The two major subtypes of this condition are ideomotor (see APRAXIA, IDEOMOTOR) and ideational apraxia, which refers to loss of the ability to mentally formulate the processes involved with performing an action. For example, dressing apraxia may result from an inability to mentally formulate the act of placing clothes on the body. Apraxias are generally associated with lesions of the dominant PARIETAL LOBE and supramarginal gyrus. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp56-7)
  1
 

Verbal Apraxias -- See Apraxias


A group of cognitive disorders characterized by the inability to perform previously learned skills that cannot be attributed to deficits of motor or sensory function. The two major subtypes of this condition are ideomotor (see APRAXIA, IDEOMOTOR) and ideational apraxia, which refers to loss of the ability to mentally formulate the processes involved with performing an action. For example, dressing apraxia may result from an inability to mentally formulate the act of placing clothes on the body. Apraxias are generally associated with lesions of the dominant PARIETAL LOBE and supramarginal gyrus. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp56-7)
  1
 

Verbal Apraxias, Developmental -- See Apraxias


A group of cognitive disorders characterized by the inability to perform previously learned skills that cannot be attributed to deficits of motor or sensory function. The two major subtypes of this condition are ideomotor (see APRAXIA, IDEOMOTOR) and ideational apraxia, which refers to loss of the ability to mentally formulate the processes involved with performing an action. For example, dressing apraxia may result from an inability to mentally formulate the act of placing clothes on the body. Apraxias are generally associated with lesions of the dominant PARIETAL LOBE and supramarginal gyrus. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp56-7)
  1
 

Verbal Auditory Hallucination -- See Hallucinations


Subjectively experienced sensations in the absence of an appropriate stimulus, but which are regarded by the individual as real. They may be of organic origin or associated with MENTAL DISORDERS
  1
  Verbal auditory hallucinations -- 2 Related Subjects   2
  Verbal behavior -- 6 Related Subjects   6
Verbal behavior.   51
Verbal behavior -- Congresses.   3
Verbal behavior -- Periodicals   4
Verbal behavior -- Popular works. : When I say no, I feel guilty : how to cope--using the skills of systematic assertive therapy / Manuel J. Smith  1975 1
 

Verbal Behaviors -- See Verbal Behavior


Includes both producing and responding to words, either written or spoken
  1
 

Verbal child abuse -- See Psychological child abuse


  1
 

Verbal communication -- See Oral communication


Here are entered works on speaking as a means of communication. Works on the oral production of meaningful sounds in language are entered under Speech
  1
Verbal conditioning. : Verbal behavior / B. F. Skinner  1957 1
 

Verbal Dyspraxia -- See Apraxias


A group of cognitive disorders characterized by the inability to perform previously learned skills that cannot be attributed to deficits of motor or sensory function. The two major subtypes of this condition are ideomotor (see APRAXIA, IDEOMOTOR) and ideational apraxia, which refers to loss of the ability to mentally formulate the processes involved with performing an action. For example, dressing apraxia may result from an inability to mentally formulate the act of placing clothes on the body. Apraxias are generally associated with lesions of the dominant PARIETAL LOBE and supramarginal gyrus. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp56-7)
  1
 

Verbal Dyspraxia, Developmental -- See Apraxias


A group of cognitive disorders characterized by the inability to perform previously learned skills that cannot be attributed to deficits of motor or sensory function. The two major subtypes of this condition are ideomotor (see APRAXIA, IDEOMOTOR) and ideational apraxia, which refers to loss of the ability to mentally formulate the processes involved with performing an action. For example, dressing apraxia may result from an inability to mentally formulate the act of placing clothes on the body. Apraxias are generally associated with lesions of the dominant PARIETAL LOBE and supramarginal gyrus. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp56-7)
  1
 

Verbal Dyspraxias -- See Apraxias


A group of cognitive disorders characterized by the inability to perform previously learned skills that cannot be attributed to deficits of motor or sensory function. The two major subtypes of this condition are ideomotor (see APRAXIA, IDEOMOTOR) and ideational apraxia, which refers to loss of the ability to mentally formulate the processes involved with performing an action. For example, dressing apraxia may result from an inability to mentally formulate the act of placing clothes on the body. Apraxias are generally associated with lesions of the dominant PARIETAL LOBE and supramarginal gyrus. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp56-7)
  1
 

Verbal Dyspraxias, Developmental -- See Apraxias


A group of cognitive disorders characterized by the inability to perform previously learned skills that cannot be attributed to deficits of motor or sensory function. The two major subtypes of this condition are ideomotor (see APRAXIA, IDEOMOTOR) and ideational apraxia, which refers to loss of the ability to mentally formulate the processes involved with performing an action. For example, dressing apraxia may result from an inability to mentally formulate the act of placing clothes on the body. Apraxias are generally associated with lesions of the dominant PARIETAL LOBE and supramarginal gyrus. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp56-7)
  1
 

Verbal Fluency Disorder -- See Speech Disorders


Acquired or developmental conditions marked by an impaired ability to comprehend or generate spoken forms of language
  1
 

Verbal Fluency Disorders -- See Speech Disorders


Acquired or developmental conditions marked by an impaired ability to comprehend or generate spoken forms of language
  1
 

Verbal hallucinations -- See Auditory hallucinations


  1
 

Verbal intelligence -- See Verbal ability


  1
  Verbal Learning -- 2 Related Subjects   2
Verbal Learning.   9
Verbal learning -- Congresses.   2
Verbal learning -- Evaluation. : Detecting growth in language / James Moffett  1992 1
Verbal Learning -- Periodicals : Journal of memory and language (Online)    1
 

Verbal Learnings -- See Verbal Learning


Learning to respond verbally to a verbal stimulus cue
  1
Grammar, Comparative and general -- Verbal phrase : The expression of predicative possession : a comparative study of Belarusian and Lithuanian / Lidia Federica Mazzitelli  2015 1
 

Verbal self-defense -- See Also Quarreling


  1
Verbal self-defense.   12
Verbal self-defense -- Philosophy.   2
Chinese language -- Verbals. : Word-class flexibility in classical Chinese : verbal and adverbial uses of nouns / by Lukáš Zádrapa  2011 1
 

Verbals (Grammar) -- See Grammar, Comparative and general Verbals


  1
Grammar, Comparative and general -- Verbals   4
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