Book Cover
E-book

Title Writing medieval women's lives / edited by Charlotte Newman Goldy and Amy Livingstone
Edition First edition
Published New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2012
Online access available from:
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Description 1 online resource (xii, 294 pages) : illustrations
Series The new Middle Ages
New Middle Ages (Palgrave Macmillan (Firm))
Contents Introduction: setting the scene / Charlotte Newman Goldy and Amy Livingstone -- The foundation legend of Godstow Abbey: a holy woman's life in Anglo-Norman verse / Emilie Amt -- Remembering Countess Delphine's books: reading as a means to shape a holy woman's sanctity / Nicole Archambeau -- The letters of Princess Sophia of Hungary, a nun at Admont / Jonathan R. Lyon -- The missing Russian women: the case of Evpraksia Vsevolodovna / Christian Raffensperger -- Leaving Warboys: emigration from a fifteenth-century English village / Anne Reiber DeWindt -- Women as legal agents in late medieval Genoa / Jamie Smith -- Piecing together the fragments: telling the lives of the ladies of Lavardin through image and text / Amy Livingstone -- Girlindis and Alpais: telling the lives of two textile fabricators in the Carolingian empire / Valerie L. Garver -- Agents or pawns?: the experiences of the peasant women of Rousillon in the Blanquet family parchments, 1292-1345 / Rebecca Lynn Winer -- Joan de Valence, a lady of substance / Linda E. Mitchell -- Royal women in late medieval Spain: Catalina of Lancaster, Leonor of Albuquerque, and MarĂ­a of Castile / Theresa Earenfight -- Muriel, a Jew of Oxford: using the dramatic to understand the mundane in Anglo-Norman towns / Charlotte Newman Goldy -- Well-behaved women can make history: women's friendships in late medieval Westminster / Katherine L. French
Summary "Medieval women's history is entering a new stage. In the last thirty years medievalists have recovered the sources about women, and have moved women to the foreground of narratives to view society from their vantage point. Prosopographic methods have been implemented to learn about the least documented women though they often lack a human face. This volume responds to various questions of how historians are asking. Can we go beyond the most powerful of women while retaining the personal aspect possible with a biographical approach? How can we write about the mundane aspects of female life rarely deemed worthy of textual mention? How far can we extrapolate from our fragmentary sources and yet remain historical? Scholars working on the history of early modern women have already demonstrated that we can write about women who left only fragmentary evidence of their lives as compelling and illuminating history in part by experimenting with narrative structures. The work in this volume demonstrates that techniques used by these historians can be equally fruitful in writing a more complete history of medieval women. The historians in this collection are looking for ways to expand the ways we examine and write about medieval women. They are interested in the great and the obscure, and women from different times and places. They all attempt to get closer to the life as lived, personified in individual stories. As such, these essays prompt us to rethink what we can know about women, how we can know it, and how we can write about them to expand our insights"-- Provided by publisher
Medieval women's history is entering a new stage. In the last thirty years medievalists have recovered the sources about women, and have moved women to the foreground of narratives to view society from their vantage point. Prosopographic methods have been implemented to learn about the least documented women though they often lack a human face. This volume responds to various questions of how historians are asking. Can we go beyond the most powerful of women while retaining the personal aspect possible with a biographical approach? How can we write about the mundane aspects of female life rarely deemed worthy of textual mention? How far can we extrapolate from our fragmentary sources and yet remain historical? Scholars working on the history of early modern women have already demonstrated that we can write about women who left only fragmentary evidence of their lives as compelling and illuminating history in part by experimenting with narrative structures. The work in this volume demonstrates that techniques used by these historians can be equally fruitful in writing a more complete history of medieval women. The historians in this collection are looking for ways to expand the ways we examine and write about medieval women. They are interested in the great and the obscure, and women from different times and places. They all attempt to get closer to the life as lived, personified in individual stories. As such, these essays prompt us to rethink what we can know about women, how we can know it, and how we can write about them to expand our insights
Bibliography Includes bibliographical references and index
Notes Print version record
Subject Medievalists.
Middle Ages -- Historiography.
Women and literature -- Europe -- History -- To 1500.
Women -- History -- Middle Ages, 500-1500.
Genre/Form History.
Form Electronic book
Author Goldy, Charlotte Newman, 1949-
Livingstone, Amy, 1961-
LC no. 2012018100
ISBN 1137074701 (electronic bk.)
9781137074706 (electronic bk.)
(hardback)
(hardback)