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E-book
Author Greenspan, Donald.

Title Molecular and particle modelling of laminar and turbulent flows / by Donald Greenspan
Published Hackensack, NJ : World Scientific, [2005]
©2005
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Description 1 online resource (ix, 168 pages) : illustrations
Contents Cover -- Contents -- Preface -- 1. Mathematical, Physical, and Computational Preliminaries -- 1.1. The N-Body Problem -- 1.2. Classical Molecular Potentials -- 1.3. Molecular Mechanics -- 1.4. The Leap Frog Formulas -- ALGORITHM 8212; PROGRAM LEAP FROG -- 1.5. Turbulence -- 1.5.1. Engineering -- 1.5.2. Theoretical -- 1.5.3. Numerical -- 1.6. Overview -- 2. Molecular Cavity Flow of Argon Vapor in Two Dimensions -- 2.1. Introduction -- 2.2. Equations of Motion for Argon Vapor -- 2.3. The Cavity Problem -- 2.4. Computational Considerations -- 2.5. Examples of Primary Vortex Generation -- 2.6. Example of Turbulent Flow -- 2.7. Remarks -- 2.8. The Fortran Program ARGON. FOR -- 2.9. The Fortran Program YOUWIN. FOR -- 3. Molecular Cavity Flow of Air Vapor in Two Dimensions -- 3.1. Molecular Formulas -- 3.2. The Cavity Problem -- 3.3. Initial Data -- 3.4. Examples of Primary Vortex Generation -- 3.5. Turbulent Flow -- 3.6. The Fortran Program AIR. FOR -- 4. Molecular Cavity Flow of Water Vapor in Two Dimensions -- 4.1. Introduction -- 4.2. Equations of Motion for Water Vapor Molecules -- 4.3. Examples of Primary Vortex Generation -- 4.4. Example of Turbulent Flow -- 4.5. A Speculative Study of Liquid Water -- 4.6. The Fortran Program CAV. FOR -- 5. Molecular Cavity Flow of Water Vapor in Three Dimensions -- 5.1. Introduction -- 5.2. Molecular Arrangement and the Cavity Problem -- 5.3. Computational Considerations -- 5.4. Examples -- 5.5. Turbulent Flow -- 5.6. The Fortran program CAV3D. FOR -- 6. Particle Models of Flow in Two Dimensions -- 6.1. Introduction -- 6.2. Particle Arrangement and Equations -- 6.3. Particle Equilibrium -- 6.4. Examples -- 6.5. Turbulence -- 6.6. Heating Water Vapor in a Square Cavity -- 6.7. A Speculative Study of Liquid Water -- 6.8. Particle Equations of Motion -- 6.9. Particle Equilibrium -- 6.10. Primary Vortex Generation -- 6.11. Turbulence -- 6.12. The Fortran Program PARTICLE. FOR -- 7. The Flow of Water Vapor Around a Flat Plate -- 7.1. Introduction -- 7.2. Mathematical and Physical Preliminaries -- 7.3. Approximate Equations -- 7.4. Problem Formulation -- 7.5. Examples -- 7.6. Remarks -- 7.7. The Fortran Program PLATE. FOR -- 8. Extant Problems with Continuum Models -- 8.1. Introduction -- 8.2. Concepts of Infinity -- 8.3. The Surface Area Paradox -- 8.4. Paradoxes of Zeno -- 8.5. A Nonsolvable Problem in Population Genetics -- 8.6. Time as a Continuum in Fluid Dynamics -- 8.7. Remark -- References and Additional Sources -- Index
Summary Turbulence is the most fundamental and, simultaneously, the mostcomplex form of fluid flow. However, because an understanding ofturbulence requires an understanding of laminar flow, both areexplored in this book. Groundwork is laid by careful delineation of the necessary physical, mathematical, and numerical requirements for the studies which follow, and include discussions of N-body problems, classical molecularmechanics, dynamical equations, and the leap frog formulas for verylarge systems of second order ordinary differential equations
Bibliography Includes bibliographical references (pages 163-166) and index
Subject Laminar flow -- Mathematical models.
Turbulence -- Mathematical models.
Vapors -- Mathematical models.
Water vapor transport -- Mathematical models.
Form Electronic book
LC no. 2004066158
ISBN 1281881023
9781281881021
9789812560964 (hbk. ; alk. paper)
9789812569356 (electronic bk.)
9812560963 (hbk. ; alk. paper)
9812569359 (electronic bk.)
Other Titles Molecular and particle modeling of laminar and turbulent flows