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Book Cover
E-book
Author Sinopoli, Jim, author

Title Advanced technology for smart buildings / James Sinopoli
Published Boston : Artech House, [2016]
Online access available from:
EBSCO eBook Academic Collection    View Resource Record  

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Description 1 online resource (xiv, 201 pages): illustrations
Series Artech House power engineering library
Artech House power engineering series.
Contents Machine generated contents note: 1. The Role of Owners and Architects in a Smart Building -- 1.1. Design Teams -- 1.2. Facility Programming -- 1.3. Siting the Building -- 1.4. Materials -- 1.5. Coordination -- 1.6. The Handoff to Operations -- 2. Measuring the Performance of a Building -- 2.1. Financial Metrics -- 2.2. Security and Life Safety -- 2.2.1. Operations and Maintenance -- 2.3. Productivity and Satisfaction of Building Occupants -- 3. Essential Attributes of a Smart Building -- 3.1. Cabling Infrastructure, Lighting Control Systems, and Facility Management Systems -- 3.1.1. Cabling Infrastructure -- 3.1.2. Lighting Control Systems -- 3.1.3. Facility Management Tools -- 3.2. System Integration, Audio-Visual Systems, and Water -- 3.2.1. System Integration -- 3.2.2. Audio-Visual Systems -- 3.2.3. Paging and Messaging Systems -- 3.2.4. Water -- 3.3. Occupant Satisfaction, Fire Alarm, Networks and Security -- 3.3.1. Occupant Satisfaction -- 3.3.2. Fire Alarm -- 3.3.3. Network and Security -- 3.4. Electrical, Building Metering, and Video Surveillance Systems -- 3.4.1. Electrical -- 3.4.2. Building Metering -- 3.4.3. Video Surveillance Systems -- 3.5. Advanced Building Management Systems, Communication, Data Infrastructure and HVAC, Access Control and Sustainability -- 3.5.1. Advanced Building Management Systems -- 3.5.2. Communication and Data Infrastructure -- 3.5.3. HVAC -- 3.5.4. Access Control System -- 3.5.5. Sustainability and Innovation -- 3.6. The Constantly Evolving Smart Building -- 3.6.1. Smart Buildings and Cities -- 3.6.2. The Internet of Things and Smart Buildings -- 4. Information Technology in Building Systems -- 4.1. Overview -- 4.2. Communications Protocols -- 4.2.1. Wireless Infrastructure -- 4.2.2. Wireless Network Types -- 4.2.3. Cable Infrastructure -- 4.3. Construction Costs -- 4.3.1. Converge The Cabling Types -- 4.3.2. Coordinate Pathways for All the Technology Systems -- 4.3.3. Reduce the Number of Cabling Contractors -- 4.3.4. Use a Client's Master Agreements for the Materials and Equipment -- 4.3.5. Single Point for Cabling Administration -- 4.4. Operational Costs -- 4.4.1. Warranties -- 4.4.2. Expansion -- 4.4.3. Use Cabling Consolidation Points -- 4.5. Security -- 4.5.1. Tips on Preventing a Security Breach -- 4.6. Communication and Data Infrastructure -- 4.7. Facility Management Software -- 4.7.1. Work Order System -- 4.7.2. Preventative and Predictive Maintenance -- 4.7.3. Space Planning -- 4.7.4. Material and Equipment Parts Inventory Control -- 4.7.5. Asset Management -- 4.7.6. Data standards -- 4.7.7. BIM Integration -- 5. The Management of Building System Data -- 5.1. Overview -- 5.2. Lack of Planning -- 5.3. Standardized Naming Conventions -- 5.4. Data Mining -- 5.5. Validation of Data -- 5.6. Document Management -- 5.7. Benefits of Data Management -- 5.8. Practical Data Management Activities -- 5.8.1. The Role of a Facility Data Manager -- 5.9. Dashboards: Transforming Data into Information -- 5.9.1. Facilitate Comparative Analysis -- 5.9.2. Customize Chart Scale For Optimal Data Presentation -- 5.9.3. Appropriate Selection of Charts -- 5.9.4. Proper Formatting of Numbers -- 5.9.5. Prioritizing Users Over Data -- 5.9.6. The Benefits of Management Dashboards -- 5.10. The Handoff Between a Newly Constructed Building and Building Operations; How Not To Fumble -- 5.10.1. Give Operations Personnel a Seat at the Table with the Design and Construction Teams -- 5.10.2. Install Some of the Facility Management Software Applications Relatively Early in the Construction Process -- 5.103. Have the General Contractor or Sub-Contractors Operate the Building For a Short Time, and Then Transfer Operations to the Owner -- 5.10.4. Insist On the Use of BIM During Design and Construction -- 5.20.5. The Most Value That Operational Personnel Can Bring to the Table Is Their Involvement In Defining the Requirements of Commissioning, System Start-Up, and Close Out Procedures -- 5.10.6. Identify the Data, Information and Resource Materials Needed to Operate the Building -- 5.10.7. The Expectations of Contractor's Requirements Must Change From Just Installing Equipment to Completing and Leaving Their Work In a Condition for Long Term Operations and Support -- 5.10.8. Conduct a Review of the Transition to Operations and Document Lessons Learn -- 6. Lighting -- 6.1. Overview -- 6.2. System Control -- 6.2.1. Relay Panels -- 6.2.2. Occupancy Sensors -- 6.2.3. Dimmers -- 6.2.4. Daylight Harvesting -- 6.2.5. Ballasts -- 6.3. Integration into Building Automation Systems -- 6.4. Emerging Lighting Systems -- 6.4.1. Interior Shading -- 6.4.2. Exterior Shading -- 6.4.3. Electrically Switchable Glass -- 6.4.4. Automation Issues -- 7. Data Analytics -- 7.1. Overview -- 7.2. Issues and Concerns in Implementing FDD -- 7.3. Guest Industry Experts -- 7.3.1. Lighting Systems -- 7.3.2. Water System and Conveyance Equipment -- 7.3.3. Power Management Systems -- 7.3.4. IT Infrastructure -- 7.3.5. Demand Response and Refrigeration -- 7.4. Case Study: Microsoft Redmond Campus -- 8. Monitoring Conveyance Systems -- 8.1. Wait Time for Elevators -- 8.2. Elevator Speed -- 8.3. Temperature and Humidity in The Machine Room -- 8.4. Energy Consumption -- 8.5. Use Video Cameras -- 8.6. Relevant Conveyance Data -- 8.7. Applications -- 9. Real Time Location Systems -- 9.1. Tags -- 9.1.1. Barcodes -- 9.1.2. RFID -- 9.1.3. QR (Quick Response Code) -- 9.1.4. Readers and Antennas -- 9.2. RTLS Host -- 9.2.1. RTLS Healthcare Example -- 9.2.2. Administrating an RTLS -- 9.3. RTLS and Indoor Positioning Systems -- 9.3.1. Companies in the IPS Space -- 9.3.2. Where Are Building Owners? -- 9.4. Security and Indoor Positioning Systems -- 9.4.1. Indoor Maps -- 10. Eye-Tracking -- 10.1. Eye Tracking Technology -- 10.1.1. Examples of Museums -- 11. Distributed Antenna Systems -- 11.1. DAS Business Model -- 11.2. Life Safety and Emergencies -- 12. DC Current -- 12.1. IT Networks -- 12.2. Data Centers -- 12.3. Renewables, Electric Vehicles, Storage -- 12.4. Lighting -- 12.5. Appliances -- 12.6. DC Power Infrastructure -- 12.7. Standards -- 13. Power Over Ethernet -- 13.1. POE Overview -- 14. Microgrids -- 14.1. Overview -- 14.2. Potential Benefits -- 14.3. Developers and Building Owners -- 14.4. Macro versus Micro -- 14.5. Generating Revenue from Microgrids -- 15. Solar Energy -- 16. Wind Power -- 17. Integrated Building Management Systems -- 17.1. Overview -- 17.2. Escalated Complexity -- 17.3. Specifications for the Future Building Management System (IBMS) -- 17.3.1. The Benefits of an IBMS -- 18. Dashboards -- 18.1. Overview -- 18.2. What to Present -- 18.3. How to Present the Information -- 18.3.1. The Position of the Information on the Dashboard -- 18.3.2. Color -- 18.3.3. Shapes and Sizes -- 18.4. Industry Examples -- 19. Video Surveillance Systems -- 19.1. Occupancy, People, Counting and Energy -- 19.2. Video Smoke Detectors -- 20. Access Control System -- 20.1. Door Contacts -- 20.2. Request-to-Exit -- 20.3. Electrified Door Hardware -- 20.4. Readers -- 21. Maintaining High Performance Control Systems -- 21.1. Software Issues -- 21.2. Communications Issues -- 21.3. Hardware Issues -- 21.4. Operator Issues -- 21.5. Steps to Take
Notes Includes index
Description based on print version record
Subject Architecture -- Technological innovations.
Intelligent buildings.
Smart structures.
Form Electronic book
ISBN 1630813729 (electronic bk.)
9781630813727 (electronic bk.)