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DNA, Fungal -- genetics : Microbial linear plasmids / volume editors, Friedhelm Meinhardt, Roland Klassen  2007 1
 

DNA G-Quadruplexes -- See G-Quadruplexes


Higher-order DNA and RNA structures formed from guanine-rich sequences. They are formed around a core of at least 2 stacked tetrads of hydrogen-bonded GUANINE bases. They can be formed from one two or four separate strands of DNA (or RNA) and can display a wide variety of topologies, which are a consequence of various combinations of strand direction, length, and sequence. (From Nucleic Acids Res. 2006;34(19):5402-15)
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DNA Gene Probes -- See DNA Probes


Species- or subspecies-specific DNA (including COMPLEMENTARY DNA; conserved genes, whole chromosomes, or whole genomes) used in hybridization studies in order to identify microorganisms, to measure DNA-DNA homologies, to group subspecies, etc. The DNA probe hybridizes with a specific mRNA, if present. Conventional techniques used for testing for the hybridization product include dot blot assays, Southern blot assays, and DNA:RNA hybrid-specific antibody tests. Conventional labels for the DNA probe include the radioisotope labels 32P and 125I and the chemical label biotin. The use of DNA probes provides a specific, sensitive, rapid, and inexpensive replacement for cell culture techniques for diagnosing infections
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DNA genealogy -- See Genetic genealogy


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DNA -- genetics   13
DNA -- Handbooks, manuals, etc.   2
 

DNA Helicase A -- See DNA Helicases


Proteins that catalyze the unwinding of duplex DNA during replication by binding cooperatively to single-stranded regions of DNA or to short regions of duplex DNA that are undergoing transient opening. In addition DNA helicases are DNA-dependent ATPases that harness the free energy of ATP hydrolysis to translocate DNA strands
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DNA Helicase E -- See DNA Helicases


Proteins that catalyze the unwinding of duplex DNA during replication by binding cooperatively to single-stranded regions of DNA or to short regions of duplex DNA that are undergoing transient opening. In addition DNA helicases are DNA-dependent ATPases that harness the free energy of ATP hydrolysis to translocate DNA strands
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DNA Helicase II -- See DNA Helicases


Proteins that catalyze the unwinding of duplex DNA during replication by binding cooperatively to single-stranded regions of DNA or to short regions of duplex DNA that are undergoing transient opening. In addition DNA helicases are DNA-dependent ATPases that harness the free energy of ATP hydrolysis to translocate DNA strands
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DNA Helicase III -- See DNA Helicases


Proteins that catalyze the unwinding of duplex DNA during replication by binding cooperatively to single-stranded regions of DNA or to short regions of duplex DNA that are undergoing transient opening. In addition DNA helicases are DNA-dependent ATPases that harness the free energy of ATP hydrolysis to translocate DNA strands
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DNA helicases.   3
 

DNA Helicases, ATP-Dependent -- See DNA Helicases


Proteins that catalyze the unwinding of duplex DNA during replication by binding cooperatively to single-stranded regions of DNA or to short regions of duplex DNA that are undergoing transient opening. In addition DNA helicases are DNA-dependent ATPases that harness the free energy of ATP hydrolysis to translocate DNA strands
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DNA Helix Destabilizing Proteins -- See DNA-Binding Proteins


Proteins which bind to DNA. The family includes proteins which bind to both double- and single-stranded DNA and also includes specific DNA binding proteins in serum which can be used as markers for malignant diseases
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DNA, Heteroduplex -- See Nucleic Acid Heteroduplexes


Double-stranded nucleic acid molecules (DNA-DNA or DNA-RNA) which contain regions of nucleotide mismatches (non-complementary). In vivo, these heteroduplexes can result from mutation or genetic recombination; in vitro, they are formed by nucleic acid hybridization. Electron microscopic analysis of the resulting heteroduplexes facilitates the mapping of regions of base sequence homology of nucleic acids
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DNA -- History   8
DNA -- History -- Drama. : Double helix / BBC ; a BBC-TV production in association with the Arts and Entertainment Network ; produced and directed by Mick Jackson  1987 1
 

DNA Hybridization Probes -- See DNA Probes


Species- or subspecies-specific DNA (including COMPLEMENTARY DNA; conserved genes, whole chromosomes, or whole genomes) used in hybridization studies in order to identify microorganisms, to measure DNA-DNA homologies, to group subspecies, etc. The DNA probe hybridizes with a specific mRNA, if present. Conventional techniques used for testing for the hybridization product include dot blot assays, Southern blot assays, and DNA:RNA hybrid-specific antibody tests. Conventional labels for the DNA probe include the radioisotope labels 32P and 125I and the chemical label biotin. The use of DNA probes provides a specific, sensitive, rapid, and inexpensive replacement for cell culture techniques for diagnosing infections
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DNA identification -- See DNA fingerprinting


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DNA -- immunology   2
DNA in art. : Difference, sameness and DNA investigations in critical art and science / Paul Vanouse  2024 1
 

DNA in genealogy -- See Genetic genealogy


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DNA Injuries -- See DNA Damage


Injuries to DNA that introduce deviations from its normal, intact structure and which may, if left unrepaired, result in a MUTATION or a block of DNA REPLICATION. These deviations may be caused by physical or chemical agents and occur by natural or unnatural, introduced circumstances. They include the introduction of illegitimate bases during replication or by deamination or other modification of bases; the loss of a base from the DNA backbone leaving an abasic site; single-strand breaks; double strand breaks; and intrastrand (PYRIMIDINE DIMERS) or interstrand crosslinking. Damage can often be repaired (DNA REPAIR). If the damage is extensive, it can induce APOPTOSIS
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DNA Injury -- See DNA Damage


Injuries to DNA that introduce deviations from its normal, intact structure and which may, if left unrepaired, result in a MUTATION or a block of DNA REPLICATION. These deviations may be caused by physical or chemical agents and occur by natural or unnatural, introduced circumstances. They include the introduction of illegitimate bases during replication or by deamination or other modification of bases; the loss of a base from the DNA backbone leaving an abasic site; single-strand breaks; double strand breaks; and intrastrand (PYRIMIDINE DIMERS) or interstrand crosslinking. Damage can often be repaired (DNA REPAIR). If the damage is extensive, it can induce APOPTOSIS
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DNA Insertion Element -- See DNA Transposable Elements


Discrete segments of DNA which can excise and reintegrate to another site in the genome. Most are inactive, i.e., have not been found to exist outside the integrated state. DNA transposable elements include bacterial IS (insertion sequence) elements, Tn elements, the maize controlling elements Ac and Ds, Drosophila P, gypsy, and pogo elements, the human Tigger elements and the Tc and mariner elements which are found throughout the animal kingdom
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  DNA Insertion Elements -- 2 Related Subjects   2
DNA, Intergenic -- physiology : Who are we? : microbes, the puppet masters! / Yuan Kun Lee  2009 1
DNA -- isolation & purification. : DNA chromatography / Douglas T. Gjerde, Christopher P. Hanna, David Hornby  2002 1
DNA -- Juvenile literature.   3
DNA -- Laboratory manuals.   10
Dna (lesões) : Oxidative damage to nucleic acids / [edited by] Mark D. Evans, Marcus S. Cooke  2007 1
 

DNA Libraries -- See Gene Library


A large collection of DNA fragments cloned (CLONING, MOLECULAR) from a given organism, tissue, organ, or cell type. It may contain complete genomic sequences (GENOMIC LIBRARY) or complementary DNA sequences, the latter being formed from messenger RNA and lacking intron sequences
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DNA Library -- See Gene Library


A large collection of DNA fragments cloned (CLONING, MOLECULAR) from a given organism, tissue, organ, or cell type. It may contain complete genomic sequences (GENOMIC LIBRARY) or complementary DNA sequences, the latter being formed from messenger RNA and lacking intron sequences
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DNA-ligand binding -- See DNA-ligand interactions


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  DNA-ligand interactions -- 2 Related Subjects   2
DNA-ligand interactions.   6
DNA Ligases : Development of selective DNA-interacting ligands : understanding the function of non-canonical DNA structures / Sefan Asamitsu  2020 1
 

DNA Low-Copy Repeat -- See Segmental Duplications, Genomic


Low-copy (2-50) repetitive DNA elements that are highly homologous and range in size from 1000 to 400,000 base pairs
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DNA Low-Copy Repeats -- See Segmental Duplications, Genomic


Low-copy (2-50) repetitive DNA elements that are highly homologous and range in size from 1000 to 400,000 base pairs
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DNA Marker -- See Genetic Markers


A phenotypically recognizable genetic trait which can be used to identify a genetic locus, a linkage group, or a recombination event
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  DNA markers -- 2 Related Subjects   2
DNA -- Mathematical models : Semi-Markov chains and hidden semi-Markov models toward applications : their use in reliability and DNA analysis / Vlad Stefan Barbu and Nikolaos Limnios  2008 1
DNA -- metabolism   9
DNA -- Metabolism -- Genetic aspects : Charge migration in DNA : perspectives from physics, chemistry, and biology / [edited by] Tapash Chakraborty  2007 1
  DNA Methylation -- 2 Related Subjects   2
DNA -- Methylation.   34
DNA -- Methylation -- Congresses. : Epigenetics  2004 1
DNA Methylation -- genetics   3
DNA -- Methylation -- Handbooks, manuals, etc : DNA methylation : approaches, methods, and applications / edited by Manel Esteller  2005 1
DNA -- Methylation -- Laboratory manuals   3
DNA Methylation -- physiology   2
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