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DNA Sequence Determination -- See Sequence Analysis, DNA


A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis
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DNA Sequence Determinations -- See Sequence Analysis, DNA


A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis
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  DNA Sequence, Unstable -- 2 Related Subjects   2
 

DNA Sequences -- See Base Sequence


The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence
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DNA Sequencing -- See Sequence Analysis, DNA


A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis
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DNA Sequencing, High-Throughput -- See High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing


Techniques of nucleotide sequence analysis that increase the range, complexity, sensitivity, and accuracy of results by greatly increasing the scale of operations and thus the number of nucleotides, and the number of copies of each nucleotide sequenced. The sequencing may be done by analysis of the synthesis or ligation products, hybridization to preexisting sequences, etc
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DNA Shuffling -- See Also Protein Engineering


Procedures by which protein structure and function are changed or created in vitro by altering existing or synthesizing new structural genes that direct the synthesis of proteins with sought-after properties. Such procedures may include the design of MOLECULAR MODELS of proteins using COMPUTER GRAPHICS or other molecular modeling techniques; site-specific mutagenesis (MUTAGENESIS, SITE-SPECIFIC) of existing genes; and DIRECTED MOLECULAR EVOLUTION techniques to create new genes
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DNA Shuffling. : Advanced molecular plant breeding : meeting the challenge of food security / edited by D. N. Bharadwaj, PhD  2019 1
 

DNA Single-Stranded Binding Protein -- See DNA-Binding Proteins


Proteins which bind to DNA. The family includes proteins which bind to both double- and single-stranded DNA and also includes specific DNA binding proteins in serum which can be used as markers for malignant diseases
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DNA -- Social aspects   2
DNA -- Structure.   15
DNA -- Structure -- Congresses : Mathematics of DNA structure, function and interactions / Craig John Benham [and others], editors  2009 1
DNA -- Structure -- Periodicals : Journal of structural and functional genomics (Online)  2000- 1
DNA -- Study and teaching (Secondary) : The Future Revealed: Tiny Revolution / Director: MacAskill, Robert  2009 1
 

DNA Synthesis -- See Also the narrower term DNA replication


Here are entered works on the synthesis of DNA from parental double-stranded DNA by a process in which the strands unwind and each serves as a template for a new strand that is complementary to the parental strand. Works on the synthesis of DNA by chemical or enzymatic means not relying on a DNA template are entered under DNA--Synthesis
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DNA -- Synthesis.   16
 

DNA Synthesis Factor -- See Fibroblast Growth Factors


A family of small polypeptide growth factors that share several common features including a strong affinity for HEPARIN, and a central barrel-shaped core region of 140 amino acids that is highly homologous between family members. Although originally studied as proteins that stimulate the growth of fibroblasts this distinction is no longer a requirement for membership in the fibroblast growth factor family
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DNA -- Synthesis -- Laboratory manuals. : Eukaryotic DNA replication : a practical approach / edited by Sue Cotterill  1999 1
DNA -- Testing.   32
 

DNA, Tetraplex -- See G-Quadruplexes


Higher-order DNA and RNA structures formed from guanine-rich sequences. They are formed around a core of at least 2 stacked tetrads of hydrogen-bonded GUANINE bases. They can be formed from one two or four separate strands of DNA (or RNA) and can display a wide variety of topologies, which are a consequence of various combinations of strand direction, length, and sequence. (From Nucleic Acids Res. 2006;34(19):5402-15)
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DNA Therapy -- See Genetic Therapy


Techniques and strategies which include the use of coding sequences and other conventional or radical means to transform or modify cells for the purpose of treating or reversing disease conditions
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DNA topoisomerase I. : The most important fish in the sea : menhaden and America / H. Bruce Franklin  2007 1
 

DNA topoisomerases -- See Also the narrower term DNA topoisomerase I


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DNA topoisomerases -- Inhibitors : DNA topoisomerases and cancer / Yves Pommier, editor  2012 1
DNA Topoisomerases, Type I -- chemistry : DNA topoisomerases and cancer / Yves Pommier, editor  2012 1
DNA Topoisomerases, Type I -- genetics : DNA topoisomerases and cancer / Yves Pommier, editor  2012 1
 

DNA Transposable Element -- See DNA Transposable Elements


Discrete segments of DNA which can excise and reintegrate to another site in the genome. Most are inactive, i.e., have not been found to exist outside the integrated state. DNA transposable elements include bacterial IS (insertion sequence) elements, Tn elements, the maize controlling elements Ac and Ds, Drosophila P, gypsy, and pogo elements, the human Tigger elements and the Tc and mariner elements which are found throughout the animal kingdom
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  DNA Transposable Elements -- 3 Related Subjects   3
DNA Transposable Elements   4
DNA Transposable Elements -- genetics.   2
 

DNA Transposon -- See DNA Transposable Elements


Discrete segments of DNA which can excise and reintegrate to another site in the genome. Most are inactive, i.e., have not been found to exist outside the integrated state. DNA transposable elements include bacterial IS (insertion sequence) elements, Tn elements, the maize controlling elements Ac and Ds, Drosophila P, gypsy, and pogo elements, the human Tigger elements and the Tc and mariner elements which are found throughout the animal kingdom
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DNA Transposons -- See DNA Transposable Elements


Discrete segments of DNA which can excise and reintegrate to another site in the genome. Most are inactive, i.e., have not been found to exist outside the integrated state. DNA transposable elements include bacterial IS (insertion sequence) elements, Tn elements, the maize controlling elements Ac and Ds, Drosophila P, gypsy, and pogo elements, the human Tigger elements and the Tc and mariner elements which are found throughout the animal kingdom
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DNA Trap, Extracellular -- See Extracellular Traps


Extracellular structure primarily composed of CHROMATIN and associated PROTEASES
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DNA Traps, Extracellular -- See Extracellular Traps


Extracellular structure primarily composed of CHROMATIN and associated PROTEASES
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DNA Tumor Virus -- See DNA Tumor Viruses


DNA viruses producing malignant tumors. Of the six major groupings of DNA viruses four contain members which are actually or potentially oncogenic: the Adenoviridae, the Herpesviridae, the Papovaviridae, and the Poxviridae
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DNA tumor viruses -- See Oncogenic DNA viruses


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DNA Tumor Viruses.   2
DNA Tumor Viruses -- pathogenicity : DNA tumor viruses / Blossom Damania, James M. Pipas, editors  2009 1
DNA Tumor Viruses -- physiology   2
 

DNA Typing -- See DNA Fingerprinting


A technique for identifying individuals of a species that is based on the uniqueness of their DNA sequence. Uniqueness is determined by identifying which combination of allelic variations occur in the individual at a statistically relevant number of different loci. In forensic studies, RESTRICTION FRAGMENT LENGTH POLYMORPHISM of multiple, highly polymorphic VNTR LOCI or MICROSATELLITE REPEAT loci are analyzed. The number of loci used for the profile depends on the ALLELE FREQUENCY in the population
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DNA Typings -- See DNA Fingerprinting


A technique for identifying individuals of a species that is based on the uniqueness of their DNA sequence. Uniqueness is determined by identifying which combination of allelic variations occur in the individual at a statistically relevant number of different loci. In forensic studies, RESTRICTION FRAGMENT LENGTH POLYMORPHISM of multiple, highly polymorphic VNTR LOCI or MICROSATELLITE REPEAT loci are analyzed. The number of loci used for the profile depends on the ALLELE FREQUENCY in the population
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DNA -- ultrastructure. : DNA topology / Andrew D Bates, Anthony Maxwell  2005 1
 

DNA Unwinding Proteins -- See DNA Helicases


Proteins that catalyze the unwinding of duplex DNA during replication by binding cooperatively to single-stranded regions of DNA or to short regions of duplex DNA that are undergoing transient opening. In addition DNA helicases are DNA-dependent ATPases that harness the free energy of ATP hydrolysis to translocate DNA strands
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DNA Vaccines -- See Vaccines, DNA


Recombinant DNA vectors encoding antigens administered for the prevention or treatment of disease. The host cells take up the DNA, express the antigen, and present it to the immune system in a manner similar to that which would occur during natural infection. This induces humoral and cellular immune responses against the encoded antigens. The vector is called naked DNA because there is no need for complex formulations or delivery agents; the plasmid is injected in saline or other buffers
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DNA vaccines.   5
 

DNA Vaccines, Naked -- See Vaccines, DNA


Recombinant DNA vectors encoding antigens administered for the prevention or treatment of disease. The host cells take up the DNA, express the antigen, and present it to the immune system in a manner similar to that which would occur during natural infection. This induces humoral and cellular immune responses against the encoded antigens. The vector is called naked DNA because there is no need for complex formulations or delivery agents; the plasmid is injected in saline or other buffers
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DNA vaccines -- Periodicals : Genetic vaccines and therapy  2003- 1
 

DNA Vaccines, Recombinant -- See Vaccines, DNA


Recombinant DNA vectors encoding antigens administered for the prevention or treatment of disease. The host cells take up the DNA, express the antigen, and present it to the immune system in a manner similar to that which would occur during natural infection. This induces humoral and cellular immune responses against the encoded antigens. The vector is called naked DNA because there is no need for complex formulations or delivery agents; the plasmid is injected in saline or other buffers
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DNA, Viral.   2
 

DNA Virus -- See DNA Viruses


Viruses whose nucleic acid is DNA
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